12th Post Vegetarian Marathon: Is your bomb shelter ready? Vegetable Soup for Mrs. Ettinger; Hearing Shofer at home, Salt Options for Self or Family member in your care.

This blog may seem to combine two unrelated matters: Life in Israel with it’s stresses, appreciating a neighbor’s situation and the danger that excess salt poses to the body.

Each provides a challenge and an opportunity to do a kindness (chesed).
I read this advertisement on the Israel site called Tanglo, a user group of Anglos (English speakers) who live in Tel Aviv.

Is Your Bomb Shelter Ready?

“I live in Jerusalem, so I really don’t need one.”
“We just need to clear out the junk and sweep the floor. That’s ready enough”
Bad idea!
Don’t think about “what was.” Consider “what could be,” and be prepared!
Did you know that Hamas missiles and rockets are reaching farther and becoming more accurate? And what will be with Hezbollah, Syria, and Iran???
Call now to schedule a FREE evaluation of your bomb shelter.
We will check your: Doors and windows seals Electrical lighting and sockets, Toilet and drain Water storage unit Glow-in-the-dark paint for corners and door frames Glow-in-the-dark signs Fire extinguishers First aid kit Painting We have the experience and the equipment to get the job done right.

CALL NOW!
052 241 7363

I don’t know anyone in Jerusalem walking around with a check-list. Yes,  people in Tel Aviv, are doing such a survey. I visited Mrs. Ettinger, my upstairs Jerusalem neighbor, a Holocaust survivor. I inquired, “What did you do when you heard the sirens”? That was a month ago. I recall, she looked at me a little quizzically. She replied, “I lived through the war, many wars. This is nothing”. (shum devar).

In the last month she appears to have endured an even greater decline. She used to walk to the corner makolet (grocery). Yossie, the owner would walk her back and practically carry her up to the elevator. She’d be sprawled on his arm when they reached the building. His son would bring the packages as an after-thought. That was when she didn’t have an aide. Now the helper is an appendage to Mrs. Ettinger’s side.

On erev Rosh Ha Shanah, a few days ago, I visited Mrs. Ettinger. She was lying in bed. Her helper complained to me, “All she wants to eat is cake”. I looked in her refrigerator. Yes, it was loaded with cakes and custards. I asked, “And also she eats these sweets at her children’s house?” She replied, “Yes, she also wants purreid food. But I don’t have a blender.”
I went over to the bed and saw that Mrs. Ettinger was awake. I bent down and said in Hebrew. “Happy New Year, Mrs. Ettinger. Would you like some soup? It’s 100% tasty”. She replied,
“Gan Eden”.
I brought a tin of purreid soup up to her. I assumed that she ate it. It tasted great to me, fresh and steaming. The gesture stemmed from my inability to leave things alone.
I have omitted photos of the soup preparation. The broth was a hodge-podge of vegetable peels simmered for an hour. The resulting broth became the base of layers of chopped vegetables that mingled. There was no oil added and the result was simmered to perfection, the deep greens floating in my home-made broth like DNA molecules under a microscope.

The next day at about 1:30 PM three visitors appeared at our door to blow shofer for my husband, who was unable to attend services due to health reasons. The two men are in my husband’s minyan ( 10 fellow congregants) and were dressed in the traditional Ger chassidim attire. They stood tall and the younger one raised up a beautiful shofer. The sounds of the shofer bounced off the thick walls of our building. We left the entrance door open and stood in the hall. It was the closest that I ever got to sitting in the front row for a live concert performance.

The two shofer blowers returned the next day. I was prepared and ran upstairs with my two grand-sons to get Mrs. Ettinger out of bed to hear shofer. True, only men are required to hear shofer blowing, but today woman have taken on that requirement. Mrs. Ettinger sprang to her feet and arrived to her chair in the hall and breathed in the steady rhythm of the bleats with my grand-sons standing next to her. I know that they will talk about hearing shofer in their Zaidy’s house to their friends.

I inquired the next day with Mrs. Ettinger’s caretaker. “No, she didn’t eat the soup.” I guess she liked smelling it. Maybe it reminded of the soup that she had  in her German interrupted child-hood.

Now for the constant assault on our bodies: salt. The recommended amount is 1,500 milligrams per day for a patient who has a serious health problem to this limitation. For a patient with heart and kidney problems there are also potassium limitations in addition to sodium. As you can see, cottage cheese, tuna canned in spring water, tomato juice, american cheese, buttermilk and processed meat are very high in sodium.

Food

Serving Size

Milligrams salt

Protein

Chicken (dark meat)

3.5 oz roasted

87

Chicken (light meat)

3.5 oz roasted

77

Egg, fried

1 large

162

Egg, scrambled with milk

1 large

171

Dried beans, peas, or lentils

1 cup

4

Haddock

3 oz cooked

74

Halibut

3 oz cooked

59

Hamburger (lean)

3.5 oz broiled medium

77

Hot dog, beef

1 medium

585

Peanuts, dry roasted

1 oz

228

Roast lamb leg

3.5 oz

65

Roast veal leg

3.5 oz

68

Salmon

3 oz

50

Shrimp

3 oz

190

Spareribs, braised

3.5 oz

93

Steak, T-bone

3.5 oz

66

Tuna, canned in spring water

3 oz. chunk white

300

Turkey (dark meat)

3.5 oz roasted

76

Turkey (light meat)

3.5 oz roasted

63

Dairy Products

American cheese

1 oz

443

Buttermilk, salt added

1 cup

260

Cheddar cheese

1 oz

175

Cottage cheese, low-fat

1 cup

918

Milk, whole

1 cup

120

Milk, skim or 1%

1 cup

125

Swiss cheese

1 oz

75

Yogurt, plain

1 cup

115

Vegetables and vegetable juices

Asparagus

6 spears

10

Avocado

1/2 medium

10

Beans, white cooked

1 cup

4

Beans, green

1 cup

4

Beets

1 cup

84

Broccoli, raw

1/2 cup

12

Broccoli, cooked

1/2 cup

20

Carrot, raw

1 medium

25

Carrot, cooked

1/2 cup

52

Celery

1 stalk raw

35

Corn (sweet, no butter/salt)

1/2 cup boiled

14

Cucumber

1/2 cup sliced

1

Eggplant, raw

1 cup

2

Eggplant, cooked

1 cup

4

Lettuce

1 leaf

2

Lima beans

1 cup

5

Mushrooms

1/2 cup (raw or cooked)

1 to 2

Mustard greens

1/2 cup chopped

12

Onion, chopped

1/2 cup (raw or cooked)

2 to 3

Peas

1 cup

4

Potato

1 baked

7

Radishes

10

11

Spinach, raw

1/2 cup

22

Spinach, cooked

1/2 cup

63

Squash, acorn

1/2 cup

4

Sweet potato

1 small

12

Tomato

1 medium

11

Tomato juice, canned

3/4 cup

660

Fruits and fruit juices

Apple

1 medium

1

Apple juice

1 cup

7

Apricots

3 medium

1

Apricots (dried)

10 halves

3

Banana

1 medium

1

Cantaloupe

1/2 cup chopped

14

Dates

10 medium

2

Grapes

1 cup

2

Grape juice

1 cup

7

Grapefruit

1/2 medium

0

Grapefruit juice

1 cup

3

Orange

1 medium

1

Orange juice

1 cup

2

Peach

1

0

Prunes (dried)

10

3

Raisins

1/3 cup

6

Strawberries

1 cup

2

Watermelon

1 cup

3

Now, try to total up your daily salt in-take. The next post will focus on iron-rich foods, to help fight anemia.

Li Hitraot,

Ida

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