Post 18 Vegetarian Marathon: Solutions to the lack of hall lighting in most buildings : Give me a hug I’m into z’hug-taking a break from recipes

I saved this series from 2011. Conditions are very much the same today. Comments are from a local user group.

 

Thank you to everyone who responded to my question about kids using elevators. The reason I asked the question is that our 10-year old daughter is charged with the duty to take the dog out every evening. Since she is not able to take the elevator (by law and the warnings of the vaad bayit), she uses the stairs.

 

It gets quite dark in the winter in our building so we found a way of keeping the stairwell light on (we removed the spring from the switch in our apartment). The problem is that she sometimes forgets to turn the switch off when she gets back. Is there a device that allows you to turn the lights on for a longer amount of time than 30 seconds? We can’t use a shabbat clock for some reason ( I think the current is too low) in these stairwell switches.

 

Black Bear Honey

 

“Made in Israel with love from above”

 

<http://www.blackbear.co.il/> www.blackbear.co.il

 

 

Stephen

 

From my many years on the vaad bayit, (manager) of several buildings over the years:

 

There are 2 types of mechanism for controlling the stairwell lighting,

both located in the building’s common fuse box.

 

The older type is called Thermion and was the only one in use until

relatively recently.

You can adjust the length of time the stairwell lights remain on for.

Forcing the staircase lights to remain on over more than several minutes

by sticking a match in the hallway light switch causes the Thermion’s

mechanism to burn out.

To avoid this, for say when the cleaner comes, a bypass switch should be

fitted to the common fusebox which keeps the stairwell lights on without

burning out the Thermion as the current goes through the switch and not

the Thermion itself.

 

The much more modern device looks like an automatic fuse that sits on

the fuse box fuse holding strip.

It too can be adjusted to keep the lights on for up to 3-4 minutes.

The advantage with this type is that it has its own bypass switch so

that the cleaner can have the stairwell lights on for as long as necessary.

However, our building went through a phase of having these units burning

out.

I am not certain whether the cause of this problem was a faulty fuse box

unit or that someone had used a match in the hallway switch or whether

one of these hallway switches was faulty and often “on”.

 

In any event, forcing the stairwell lights on in the manner you describe

is not such a good idea. The unit bypass switch is only accessible from

downstairs and as you want to avoid this trip I’m not sure what the

solution is.

 

Maybe you could continue your present solution until either the unit

burns out (which is not a certainty when or if at all) or the vaad

complains about the higher than usual electricity bill.

 

In many buildings, a separate (vaad paid for) light can be fitted on the

top floor that shines down the stairwell on shabbat to make stair use

less hazardous. This could also be used by your daughter and is

relatively inexpensive to install and operate.

 

BTW. Why can’t she just press the stairwell light button and have the

“Thermion” device set for enough time for her to get up the four flights?

 

I’d be interested to hear what other solutions there are.

 

Shabbat shalom

 

Stephen

 

On 21-Jan-11 07:31, Stephen Epstein wrote:

>

> Thank you to everyone who responded to my question about kids using

> elevators. The reason I asked the question is that our 10-year old

> daughter is charged with the duty to take the dog out every evening.

> Since she is not able to take the elevator (by law and the warnings of

> the vaad bayit), she uses the stairs.

>

> It gets quite dark in the winter in our building so we found a way of

> keeping the stairwell light on (we removed the spring from the switch

> in our apartment). The problem is that she sometimes forgets to turn

> the switch off when she gets back. Is there a device that allows you

> to turn the lights on for a longer amount of time than 30 seconds? We

> can’t use a shabbat clock for some reason ( I think the current is too

> low) in these stairwell switches.

>

> Stephen Epstein

>

> Black Bear Honey

>

> “Made in Israel with love from above”

>

> <http://www.blackbear.co.il/> www.blackbear.co.il

 

 

From:

Stephen Simpson

Tel. +972-8-9361753 or +972-7-2232-2094

Fax: +972-577-961-115

Mobile: 0505-827-115

E-mail: simpson.stephen@gmail.com

http://www.psakdin.co.il/yp/profile.asp?Expert=1398

———————————————–

 

Re: Elevators

Posted by: “jean philip” philipjean@gmail.com

Thu Jan 20, 2011 10:22 pm (PST)

 

 

Many moons ago, when my kids were young and we lived on the fourth floor

with NO elevator, I used to sharpen a matchstick and stick it into the press

button switch of the lights on the stairwell.

The lights would go off and immediately go on again, being constantly

pressed. If this still works with today’s switches, just watch out for the

neighbours who will surely complain that you are wasting electricity… so

remember to take the match out!

 

On Fri, Jan 21, 2011 at 7:31 AM, Stephen Epstein <

stephen@bigdipperphotos.com> wrote:

 

 

stairwell lighting

Posted by: “Seree” sir-e@zahav.net.il   sarazohar

Thu Jan 20, 2011 10:39 pm (PST)

 

 

My elderly mum would have a lot of trouble with those timed stairwell

lights, which would go off before she fumbled for the key and managed

to see the keyhole.

 

We got an electrician to install a light above the front door,

activated by a switch indoors. With a cost-saver bulb, it’s not such

a biggee if it’s forgotten. And that way, it’s not on the vaad costs

either and no one should have a reason to complain.

 

 

Thank you to everyone who responded to my question about kids using

elevators. The reason I asked the question is that our 10-year old

daughter is charged with the duty to take the dog out every evening.

Since she is not able to take the elevator (by law and the warnings of

the vaad bayit), she uses the stairs.

 

It gets quite dark in the winter in our building so we found a way of

keeping the stairwell light on (we removed the spring from the switch

in our apartment). The problem is that she sometimes forgets to turn

the switch off when she gets back. Is there a device that allows you

to turn the lights on for a longer amount of time than 30 seconds? We

can’t use a shabbat clock for some reason ( I think the current is too

low) in these stairwell switches.

 

Stephen Epstein

 

Black Bear Honey

 

“Made in Israel with love from above”

 

<http://www.blackbear.co.il/> www.blackbear.co.il

 As you can see, lots of tricks, not all so safe. People do take this issue seriously.

Le Hitraot,

Ida

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