Post 131: Ancient 2,000 year old mikvah found below living room in Jerusalem

Ancient 2,000 year old mikvah found below living room in Jerusalem

http://www.jewishnews.co.uk/ancient-2000-year-old-mikvah-found-below-living-room-in-jerusalem/

Assaf Peretz/Israel Antiquities Authority/Israel Sun 15-6-15 An ancient, two thousand year old ritual bath (miqwe) was discovered below a living room floor during renovations carried out in a private house in the picturesque neighborhood of ‘Ein Kerem in Jerusalem. Archaeologists of the Israel Antiquities Authority were amazed to discover that a pair of wooden doors beneath a stylized rug in the middle of a pleasant family’s living room concealed an ancient ritual bath.  Today (Wednesday) the owners of the place were awarded a certificate of appreciation by the Israel Antiquities Authority for exhibiting good citizenship in that they reported the discovery of the miqwe and thereby contributed to the study of the Land of Israel. The miqwe, which is complete and quite large (length 3.5 m, width 2.4 m, depth 1.8 m), is rock-hewn and meticulously plastered according to the laws of purity appearing in the halacha. A staircase leads to the bottom of the immersion pool. Pottery vessels dating to the time of the Second Temple (first century CE) and traces of fire that might constitute evidence of the destruction of 66-70 CE were discovered inside the bath. In addition, fragments of stone vessels were found which were common during the Second Temple period because stone cannot be contaminated and remains pure.  î÷ååä îìôðé 2000 ùðä ùäúâìä áñìåï áéú áòéï ëøí öìåí øùåú äòúé÷åú

An ancient, two thousand year old mikvah (ritual bath) was discovered below a living room floor during renovations carried out in a house in Ein Kerem, Jerusalem.

Archaeologists of the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) discovered a pair of wooden doors beneath a stylised rug in the middle of a family’s living room – which concealed an ancient ritual bath.

On Wednesday the owners  were awarded a certificate of appreciation by the IAA for exhibiting good citizenship in that they reported the discovery and thereby contributed to the study of the Land of Israel.

Assaf Peretz/Israel Antiquities Authority/Israel Sun 15-6-15 An ancient, two thousand year old ritual bath (miqwe) was discovered below a living room floor during renovations carried out in a private house in the picturesque neighborhood of ‘Ein Kerem in Jerusalem. Archaeologists of the Israel Antiquities Authority were amazed to discover that a pair of wooden doors beneath a stylized rug in the middle of a pleasant family’s living room concealed an ancient ritual bath.  Today (Wednesday) the owners of the place were awarded a certificate of appreciation by the Israel Antiquities Authority for exhibiting good citizenship in that they reported the discovery of the miqwe and thereby contributed to the study of the Land of Israel. The miqwe, which is complete and quite large (length 3.5 m, width 2.4 m, depth 1.8 m), is rock-hewn and meticulously plastered according to the laws of purity appearing in the halacha. A staircase leads to the bottom of the immersion pool. Pottery vessels dating to the time of the Second Temple (first century CE) and traces of fire that might constitute evidence of the destruction of 66-70 CE were discovered inside the bath. In addition, fragments of stone vessels were found which were common during the Second Temple period because stone cannot be contaminated and remains pure.  î÷ååä îìôðé 2000 ùðä ùäúâìä áñìåï áéú áòéï ëøí öìåí øùåú äòúé÷åú

The mikvah, which is complete and quite large (length 3.5 m, width 2.4 m, depth 1.8 m), is rock-hewn and meticulously plastered according to the laws of purity appearing in the Jewish law.

A staircase leads to the bottom of the immersion pool. Pottery vessels dating to the time of the Second Temple (first century CE) and traces of fire that might constitute evidence of the destruction of 66-70 CE were discovered inside the bath.

In addition, fragments of stone vessels were found which were common during the Second Temple period because stone cannot be contaminated and remains pure.

According to Amit Re’em, Jerusalem District Archaeologist, instances of finding antiquities beneath a private home can happen only in Israel and Jerusalem in particular.

Ein Kerem is considered a place sacred to Christianity in light of its link to the “city of Judah” – the place where according to the New Testament, John the Baptist was born.

Despite this, the archaeological remains in ‘Ein Kerem and the surrounding area.. are few and fragmented. The discovery of the ritual bath reinforces the hypothesis there was a Jewish settlement from the time of the Second Temple located in the region of what is today ‘Ein Kerem.”

Assaf Peretz/Israel Antiquities Authority/Israel Sun 15-6-15 An ancient, two thousand year old ritual bath (miqwe) was discovered below a living room floor during renovations carried out in a private house in the picturesque neighborhood of ‘Ein Kerem in Jerusalem. Archaeologists of the Israel Antiquities Authority were amazed to discover that a pair of wooden doors beneath a stylized rug in the middle of a pleasant family’s living room concealed an ancient ritual bath.  Today (Wednesday) the owners of the place were awarded a certificate of appreciation by the Israel Antiquities Authority for exhibiting good citizenship in that they reported the discovery of the miqwe and thereby contributed to the study of the Land of Israel. The miqwe, which is complete and quite large (length 3.5 m, width 2.4 m, depth 1.8 m), is rock-hewn and meticulously plastered according to the laws of purity appearing in the halacha. A staircase leads to the bottom of the immersion pool. Pottery vessels dating to the time of the Second Temple (first century CE) and traces of fire that might constitute evidence of the destruction of 66-70 CE were discovered inside the bath. In addition, fragments of stone vessels were found which were common during the Second Temple period because stone cannot be contaminated and remains pure.  î÷ååä îìôðé 2000 ùðä ùäúâìä áñìåï áéú áòéï ëøí öìåí øùåú äòúé÷åú

The owners told Israel Antiquities Authority: “Initially, we were uncertain regarding the importance of the find revealed below our house and we hesitated contacting the Israel Antiquities Authority because of the consequences we believed would be involved in doing so. At the same time, we had a strong feeling that what was situated beneath the floor of our house is a find of historical value and our sense of civic and public duty clinched it for us.

“We felt that this find deserves to be seen and properly documented. We contacted the Israel Antiquities Authority at our own initiative in order that they would complete the excavation and the task of documenting the discovery. Representatives of the IAA arrived and together we cleaned the miqwe. To our joy and indeed to our surprise, we found them to be worthy partners in this fascinating journey. The IAA archaeologists demonstrated great professionalism, interest and pleasantness. They were solely concerned with preserving and investigating the finds.”

From British Jewish News

Apple Crisp: An Israeli recipe translated from Hebrew. I was given this cake for Purim Shalach Manot. This is my first attempt to translate. Thans to the Brand family.

IMG_20150306_111819#1Ingredients:

1/2 cup olive oil

1/2 cup tahina

2 cups flour to use to crumble the above ingredients

spring form or silicon pan. Place baking sheet on bottom. Place half the crumbled mixture on the bottom.

Filling:

6-8 apples

1 cup orange juice

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 jar confection of blueberries or lemon

Instructions: Slice the apples into small pieces. Spread the confection on top of the dough. On top of that spread the apple pieces. Pour the orange juice over the apples. Or alternatively in a bowl pour the juice over the apples and place this mixture on top of the confection. Sprinkle cinnamon on top. Cover with remaining doughBake 1/2 hour at 180C.

 

 

 

 

 

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