Post 211: How does the metal detector at the Kotel work? The Zomet Institutes inventions for security and medical needs Charting the Course of Shmitta 5776

This post is about science and how it serves us. How does the metal detector at the Kotel work? How do doctors write their notes on Shabbat?

IMG_20150927_134713
This notice was posted in the new elevator in 2 Ha NaAlot. It had it’s maiden voyage this past Shabat. The first elevator circa 1930 broke down and the building owners got together and decided to install one that would work on Shabat as prescribed by the Zomet Institute.

How does a Shabbat elevator work? How does a Shabbat wheelchair work?

Come and find out how rabbis and engineers solve techno-halachic problems.

At the Zomet Visitors Center you can ask questions, learn, understand and enjoy. Best of all the exhibits are interactive!

Visitors Center Tour:

  • Presentation: “Principles of the use of electricity on Shabbat and The Zomet Institutes inventions for security and medical needs” 45 min.  (English or Hebrew)

  • -Walk through the interactive exhibit hall & watch instructional movies (English or Hebrew)

  • Self guided tour option includes the interactive exhibit hall (1-1.5 hrs)

Who Is This Tour For?

The Zomet Experience is suited to: Families of all Jewish denominations, Bat/Bar Mitzvah Tours, Synagogue Missions, Youth Movements, Birthright, Christian Tours and Senior Citizens. Just tell Zomet about your group in advance so that the program can be tailored to your interests.

About Zomet:Zomet Logo

Zomet began to focus on the crossroads of Jewish Law and Modern Life in 1976. Today the Institute is well known for its’ success in merging Torah and Modern Life. The visitors center opened to the (English) public in 2015.

Special Events on Sukkot 2015

There will guided tours on the hour (Hebrew), an engineering workshop for kids 6+ to learn to build a battery, jumpy castles for kids under 6. Activities will take place on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of Chol Hamoed. Prefer to have a private tour in English?

Hours

9:00am-5:00pm Sunday – Thursday
9:00am-12:00pm Friday

Price

Self Guided Tour- 20 NIS per person (ages 7+)
Children below age 7 – FREE

Guided Tour
Small Group (Up to 14 People)
200 NIS plus 20 NIS per person (ages 7 and up)
Children below age 7 – FREE

Large Group (15-50 people)
500 NIS – for the whole group

Ages 6+

Language

English / Hebrew

Zomet Institute

Address: HaErez 3
Alon Shvut, Israel

Neighborhood: Alon Shvut, Gush Etzion

Tel: 02-9932111

Email: zomet@funinjerusalem.com

Website: http://www.visitzomet.comParking: Free parking

 

I have created my own chart based on the prior Shmita

 

Charting the Course of Shmitta 5776
Rabbi Dovid Stein, Star-K Representative in Israel Star-K Israel Office
Rabbi David Stein
Rechov Miriam Mizrachi 7
Rechovot, ISRAEL
star-k@star-k.org

The mitzvah of shmitta poses many challenges for those who live in Eretz Yisrael.  The main challenge, of course, is for the farmers.  However, the consumer has his challenges, as well.  It is always preferable to purchase produce from stores that have reliable kosher certification to ensure that there are no halachicproblems.  If there is no such store available, one must be certain not to transgress the laws of shmitta in the purchase, consumption, or interaction with shmitta produce.  These are the different categories of halachos that one has to take into consideration:

1. Sfichin
2. Kedushas shevi’is
3. Schora (doing business) with shevi’is produce
4. Dmei shevi’is (shevi’is money)

The laws of sfichin refer to a rabbinic prohibition of eating produce that started to grow during the shmittayear,1i.e., the plant started to grow from Rosh Hashanah תשס״ח until תשס״ט .  This is the opinion of theChazon Ish, the most widely accepted custom among Ashkenazim in Eretz Yisrael.  Regarding grains and legumes, there is a different critical date after which sfichin are not permitted to be eaten.  Obviously, if one wants to buy vegetables he/she must be certain that the vegetables did not start to grow during the shmitta year.  How can one know when the produce began to grow if it is bought in a store that is not under reliable rabbinic supervision?

In order to overcome this problem, charts were developed with the information needed to ascertain whether the produce started to grow during shmitta.   For example, it takes between 58 and 78 days after a tomato seed is planted until it produces its first ripe tomato.  It takes a few more weeks until the new tomato crop constitutes a majority of the tomatoes in the market.  Until that time, we may be able to say “kol deparish meruba parish,and assume that the fruit in question comes from the prevailing majority in the marketplace, which in this case is a non-shevi’is product.  The date on the chart is usually when the majority of the vegetable production is shevi’is (although there are charts that give the date of the first produce on the market).  One should be mindful of the cut-off date for a particular type of produce before buying any fruits or vegetables that might possibly be prohibited for consumption due to sfichin.
Kedushas shevi’is applies to all vegetables picked during the shmitta year.  Picking, lekita, invests the vegetable with kedushas shevi’is when it is picked during the shmitta year.2  Since many vegetables (such as carrots and potatoes) can be stored for relatively long periods of time, most of the produce in the market does not have to be picked during the shmitta year until well after Rosh Hashanah.  The date on the chart for a given vegetable for kedushas shevi’is indicateswhen a particular type of produce was picked during theshmitta year.
Besides the issur of sfichin, there are other issues regarding produce grown during the shmitta year without rabbinic supervision.  The following are a few examples:

Shamur v’neevad:  Some authorities prohibit using produce that was “guarded” (shevi’is produce is supposed to be “hefker,” ownerless, and permitted to be taken by anyone) or upon which non-permissible work was performed during shmitta.  Produce without rabbinic supervision can fall under this category.  TheChazon Ish permitted the use of shamur veneevad b’shaas hadchak (in difficult circumstances).

Schora:  Doing business with shevi’is produce.  One is not permitted to buy in the usual way produce that has kedushas shevi’is (weighing, buying in a regular store, etc.).
Mesiras dmei shevi’is l’am haaretz:  When one buys shevi’is produce for immediate use, the money that is used to pay for the item is imbued with kedushas shevi’is and may be used only to purchase food.  Therefore, it is not permitted to give this money to a storekeeper who will not observe the laws of shevi’is.

There are ways to circumvent the above noted problems.  If one uses a credit card, there is no issue ofdmei shevi’is.  If one buys behavlaa (two things together, but paying only for the item that does not havekedushas shevi’is), there may not be a problem of schora.
If one buys produce in stores that have reliable rabbinic supervision, one does not need to refer to the charts.  Produce that has kedushas shevi’is should be marked (sometimes there are codes).  If you do need to use the chart, there is a column indicating when sfichin and kedushas shevi’is end.  Produce that was picked during the shmitta year will always have the application of kedushas shevi’is/sfichin.  Produce picked in the eighth year (תשס״ט ) has kedushas shevi’is/sfichin, either until the new crop starts or until Chanukah(whichever comes first.)

BiurProduce that has kedushas shevi’is can be kept at home only while there is some of the same produce still in the fields.  The column for biur indicates when one must dispose of all the produce (take it outside and make it hefker), after which time it can be taken back inside the house.  If the z’man biurelapsed, and biur was not performed, the produce is forbidden to be eaten.  The times for biur are very inexact, and it is not a good idea to store a lot of produce towards the end of shmitta (less than three meals for the whole family are exempt from the laws of biur).

BIUR Explained: This applies to vegetables that were used in dishes. One example: Olives that I received as a present have to be finished.

  • In Vayikra, perek 25, pasuk 7, it is written:

“ולבהמתך ולחיה אשר בארצך תהיה כל תבואתה לאכול”

“And for the cattle and for the beasts that are in thy land, shall all the increase therof be for food.” And the Chachamim [Sages] explain this verse as teaching us that- ‘all the while that the animal eats this type [of crop] from the field – you eat what is found in your house, if all the feed in the fields is finished – a man is obligated to do BIUR to that type of crop and remove it from his home.’ The obligation of BIUR is for every type of crop according to its typical way of growing and the way the animals eat it in the field. At the designated time for BIUR – every person must take all remaining Shevi’it fruits of that type that remain in his possession –and remove them from his house, and leave them outside as hefker, free of ownership- so that poor people or any person who wishes to, can take them. The obligation of BIUR applies to whatever has Kedushat Shevi’it and any products made from fruits of Shevi’it.

 

LAST DATES OF KEDUSHAS SHEVI ’IS, SEFICHIN AND BIUR
The following are ending dates of Kedushas Shevi’is, Sefichin and the dates of Biur.
ITEM

KEDUSHAS SHEVI’IS UNTIL

SEFICHIN UNTIL
BIUR
Almonds
1 Elul 5776
No Sefichin
26 Teves 5776
Apples
18 Iyar 5776
No Sefichin
17 Teves 5776
Apricots
10 Iyar 5776
No Sefichin
19 Tamuz 5776
Artichoke
25 Kislev 5776
No Sefichin3
1 Tamuz 5776
Asparagus
25 Kislev 5776
No Sefichin
No Biur4
Avocado
1 Tamuz 5776
No Sefichin3
1 Av 5776
Banana
25 Kislev 5776
No Sefichin3
No Biur4
Barley
1 Iyar 5776
1 Iyar 5776
1 Kislev 5776
Basil
3 Tishrei 5776
No Sefichin3
No Biur4
Beans
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Beets
20 Kislev 5776
20 Kislev 5769
No Biur4
Blueberries
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin
No Biur2
Broccoli
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
15 Iyar 5776
Butternut Squash
15 Sivan 5769
15 Sivan 5776
15 Tishrei 5776
Cabbage
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Cabbage (Red)
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Carob
28 Tishrei 5777
No Sefichin
15 Teves 5776
Carrots
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Cashews
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Cauliflower
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Celery
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Cherries
10 Sivan 5776
No Sefichin
1 Av 5776
Chickpeas
1 Sivan 5776
1 Sivan 5769
11 Kislev 5776
Cinnamon
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin
No Biur2
Coriander
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Corn (Fresh)
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Cranberries
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin
No Biur2
Cucumbers
1 Kislev 5776
1 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Cumin
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Dates
20 Av 5776
No Sefichin
14 Adar 5776
Dill
20 Cheshvan 5776
20 Cheshvan 5776
No Biur4
Eggplant8
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Esrog7
18 Iyar 5776
No Sefichin
18 Iyar 5776
Fennel
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
1 Shevat 5776
Figs
20 Iyar 5776
No Sefichin
25 Kislev 5776
Garlic
6 Adar 5776
6 Adar 5776
1 Tamuz 5776
Ginger
No Kedushah2
No Kedushah2
No Biur2
Grapefruit
15 Cheshvan 5777
No Sefichin
20 Sivan 5776
Grapes
15 Nisan 5776
No Sefichin
15 Nisan 5776
Grapes for Wine
15 Tamuz 5776
No Sefichin
15 Nisan 5776
Guava
13 Elul 5776
No Sefichin
16 Kislev 5776
Horseradish
25 Kislev 5769
25 Kislev 5769
No Biur4
Hyssop
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Kidney Beans
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Kimmel (caraway seeds)
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Kiwi
15 Elul 5776
No Sefichin
15 Elul 5776
Kohlrabi
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Lemon
1 Iyar 5776
No Sefichin
1 Tamuz 5776
Lentils
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Lettuce
15 Cheshvan 5776
15 Cheshvan 5776
No Biur4
Litchi 2
10 Sivan
5776 No Sefichin
6 Av 5769
Mango
10 Sivan 5776
No Sefichin
15 Teves 5776
Medlar (Shesek)
7 Adar 5776
No Sefichin
1 Sivan 5776
Melon9
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Mint
3 Tishrei 5776
No Sefichin3
No Biur4
Mushrooms
Laws of Shmittah are not applicable
Mustard
10 Sivan 5776
10 Sivan 5776
1 Av 5776
Nectarine
1 Adar 5776
No Sefichin
1 Kislev 5776
Oats
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Olives
13 Elul 5776
No Sefichin
6 Sivan 5776
Olive Oil
15 Cheshvan 5776
No Sefichin
6 Sivan 5776
Onions
1 Shevat 5776
1 Shevat 5776
No Biur4
Oranges
15 Cheshvan 5777
No Sefichin
4 Sivan 5776
Paprika
3 Elul 5776
3 Elul 5776
1 Kislev 5776
Parsley
15 Kislev 5769
15 Kislev 5769
No Biur4
Peaches
1 Adar 5776
No Sefichin
1 Kislev 5776
Peanuts
15 Elul 5777
15 Elul 5776
20 Cheshvan 5776
Pears
24 Sivan 5776
No Sefichin
1 Cheshvan 5776
Peas (Dried)
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin
No Biur2
Peas in Pod
25 Kislev 5776
25 Cheshvan 5776
1 Sivan 5776
Pecan11
15 Cheshvan 5777
No Sefichin
10 Iyar 5776
Pepper (Powder B&W)
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin
No Biur2
Pepper (Jalapeno)
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Peppers10
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Persimmon
15 Elul 5776
No Sefichin
1 Teves 5776
Pineapple
25 Kislev 5776
No Sefichin
No Biur4
Pistachio
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin
No Biur2
Plums (Euro. Longated)
1 Elul 5776
No Sefichin
20 Cheshvan 5776
Plums (Japanese Round)
22 Iyar 5776
No Sefichin
15 Kislev 5776
Pomegranate
15 Av 5776
No Sefichin
20 Shevat 5776
Pomelo
15 Cheshvan 5770
No Sefichin
20 Sivan 5776
Popcorn
1 Tamuz 5776
1 Tamuz 5776
1 Kislev 5776
Poppy Seeds
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Potatoes
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Pumpkin
10 Sivan 5776
10 Sivan 5776
1 Kislev 5776
Pumpkin Seeds
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Radish
27 Cheshvan 5776
27 Cheshvan 5776
No Biur4
Radish-Small
8 Cheshvan 5776
8 Cheshvan 5776
No Biur4
Rice
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Sabra
1 Tamuz 5776
No Sefichin
1 Cheshvan 5776
Scallion
1 Kislev 5776
1 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Sesame
No Kedushah1
No Sefichin1
No Biur1
Soya
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Spelt
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Spinach
23 Cheshvan 5776
23 Cheshvan 5776
No Biur4
Strawberries
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
10 Tamuz 5776
Sugar
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Sunflower Seeds
14 Av 5776
15 Av 5776
11 Kislev 5776
Sweet Potatoes
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
14 Adar II 5776
Tarragon
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin3
No Biur5
Tomatoes
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Turnip
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Walnut
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Watermelon
25 Kislev 5776
25 Kislev 5776
No Biur4
Wheat Products6
No Kedushah2
No Sefichin2
No Biur2
Zucchini (Squash)
1 Cheshvan 5776
1 Cheshvan 5776
No Biur4

Information on this list is based on the Shmittah 5768 Guide published by the Council of
Young Israel Rabbis in Israel and the National Council of Young Israel which I have adjusted.

FOOT NOTES FOR CHART

1. Gidulei Nochri – in Israel
2. Imported
3. Multi Year plant
4. Available all year
5. Intended for Flavor Only
6. Most wheat products used in Israel are of imported wheat and not subject to shmittah
laws. This must be ascertained from the baker or from the packaging label.
7. Most esrogim for Succos 5769 (2008) will be available from the crop harvested
through Otzar Beis Din and, therefore, the rules of kedushas shvi’is apply.
8. Most eggplant between Cheshvan and Adar Aleph are from the Southern Aravah and
gentiles.
9. In the winter, most melons are from Southern Aravah.
10. From Kislev until Adar Aleph, grown in areas that may not have been inhabited
during Shivas Tzion.
11. 90% is from Import.

 

IMG_20150920_125229

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s