Post 278: How to turn a tailored jacket into a dressy skirt and two recipes -an ancient Egyptian condiment called DUQQA and orange marmalade

 

 

Turning your closet into a treasury.

In a prior post, I described a choice that I made NOT to shop for a new dress,  because, I have everything that I need.

And you do too.

To prove that point, I  fished around for a project. You will see  a photo of the original jacket. The dicky by the neck gives the jacket away as “out of style”. I have made men’s trousers  skirts, but never took apart  a ladies jacket. Certain features made the jacket a good candidate.

1) A full lining

2) Eight panels resembling the gores of a skirt. There is a lot of work to create that. If the jacket was just straight I would have passed on it. The jacket fit around me when it was lowered into a skirt position. Using a dummy makes the job easier.

3)Interesting details, like the circular velvet around the bottom, unique buttons, velvet pockets.

 

 

Lady's Tailored Jacket
I appreciated the details on this tailored custom jacket which came from the Satmar Store in Williamsburg, Brooklyn New York. It was a size too large when I bought and now it is about 3 sizes too large. That’s how I got the idea to make it into a skirt. The pockets are decorative.

Passing photos from my phone to my blog is not 100% yet. Patience, patience.

4) Made from simple wool material as it is  necessary to  piece fabric together, the n the added seams will not be noticeable.

5) Enough material in the sleeves to make waistband, inserted pleat and facings.

 

IMG_20160209_151256

The sleeves have been removed. The original black velvet forming the V-neckline and collar have been removed. A triangular piece was cut from the sleeve and inserted across the top half of the “skirt”. 
I know that this is not a project for a beginner. However, as I explained to my grandson who is a musician, about creating.

First there is the “vision” the idea of what you are trying to reach.  There are no set rules, except that you work within the limits of your media.

The hardest part are the transitions. In sewing those are the facings. In a painting the points of color connection make the painting real and alive. In designing the new “skirt”, the challenges were making up another section containing the “pleat” and then placing it underneath. If you are a sewer, try to imaging how to do this. Stay tuned and this blog post will be updated with several photos.

Now a few recipes:
 Bat Sheva, a member of Macrolovers Jerusalem, posted ta recipe for the ancient Egyptian condiment called DUQQA. Another member, Hazel, made  it and raves about it. Here it is:
IMG_20160213_232605
I pieced together sections for the pleat and added the original velvet facings. Then the waist facings were made. .
20160308_183231

The final skirt

DUQQA-Looks delicious

3/4 cup whole sesame seeds, 1/2 cup hazelnuts, 1 heaping tablespoon cumin seeds, 1 heaping tablespoon coriander seeds, 1 teaspoon thin sea salt, 1/4
teaspoon ground black pepper. Grind together.

AND:

Orange Marmalade; A friend gave me several kilos of oranges. Holding on to them is just not possible.

Merely, removed the peels and seeds. Left in the flesh, juice and sme peel of all the oranges and a lemon.

Put the batch in the pressure cooker. Honestly after about 10 minutes, I opened the lid and tasted the orange peel that I had placed inside. Ouch, was the batch  bitter?

I then checked  a few sites (why not before), and the pressure cooker recipe called for cooking the oranges WHOLE. Didn’t want to try that.

With a grateful heart, the concoction was cooked another hour on top of the stove, until the pectin came out of the peel, and the solution thickened. Then slowly at intervals added coconut sugar until the surface changed.

I did turn the heat up and briefly boiled the marmalade rapidly until it reached setting point – a sugar thermometer will be helpful here (start checking when it reaches 104C) but to confirm this, put a teaspoonful of the marmalade on to a cold saucer and put in the fridge for a minute or so. If it crinkles when you run a finger through it, and your finger leaves a clear line in the preserve, it’s ready. If not, check it every five minutes or so. I saw mine get crinkly on the stove. I didn’t use a thermometer.

Felicity's perfect marmalade
Perfect marmalade. 

Allow to sit for 15 minutes then spoon into clean jars and seal immediately. Today, the jelly is cold and absolutely delicious. Now I have orange conserve for my family and friends.

 

 

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