Post 291:Making soup from any assortment of vegetable, Recipe Carrot, Celery Potato Cream Soup, Take precautions- List of Produce with most pesticides and link to list in Israel :http://www.adamteva.org.il/_Uploads/dbsAttachedFiles/Doch2.pdf 1חמישה עשר המזוהמים ענביםענבים 2 סלרי 3 תפוח עץ 4 פירות הדר 5 סלק 6 כוסברה 7 שמיר 8 חסה 9 נענע 10 לקט עלי בייבי 11 אגס 12 קולרבי 13 אפרסק 14 תפו”א 15 פל 1. Grapes Preparing Artichokes.

This post is about SOUP, the vegetables that go into soups and cautions that some vegetables and fruits in Israel are contaminated with large amounts of insecticides. Also included is how to prepare artichokes.

https://www.google.com/search?q=make-soup-from-almost-any-vegetable-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-35301&rlz=1C5CHFA_enIL670IL672&oq=make-soup-from-almost-any-vegetable-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-35301&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i60&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

Soup — it’s the easiest way to warm up  on a cold day and to feed yourself and your family in one delicious and healthy bowl. But you don’t need a recipe to make soup, especially if you have a clutch of miscellaneous vegetables hanging out in your crisper. Nearly any vegetable can be turned into soup with a little time and effort.

If you are craving soup and you have vegetables and broth in your cupboard, you’re all set. Here’s a step-by-step guide to transforming nearly any kind of vegetable into delicious, nourishing soup.

What Kind of Vegetable? Any Kind?

Yep, nearly any vegetable will make tasty soup. sweet potato, zucchini, squash, turnip, tomato, celery, mushrooms, onions, leeks, cabbage, kale, and chard. potatoes, rutabaga, celeriac, cauliflower, broccoli — the list goes on.

The only caveat is that you need to like the flavor of the vegetable. You can tone down turnips’ bitterness with cream or yogurt, and you can offset cabbage’s aroma with creamy white beans or tart lemon, but you can’t entirely erase the taste of a vegetable in soup, so don’t put something in that you really don’t like.

Also, nearly any texture of vegetable will work, from tender greens to hard squash, but the cooking time will change. A big pot of chard will cook down quickly, while butternut squash will need more time.

What Else Do You Need?

The essentials are vegetables and stock, plus olive oil or butter and some salt and pepper.

After that, all is optional. I usually add some aromatics — onion, garlic, or leeks — and some fresh herbs. You can flavor the vegetables with smoked salt or spices, like curry powder or cumin. I sometimes add a splash of wine to the stock.

After the soup is finished there are so many other ways to jazz it up — a can of diced tomatoes, a can of white beans or chickpeas, a sprinkle of Parmesan cheese or a dollop of yogurt.

What’s the Basic Method?

Cut about a pound of vegetables into a medium dice — about an inch across — or smaller if you’re using a hard, dense vegetable, like potato or winter squash. Sauté the vegetables in a little olive oil or butter, keeping the heat to low and letting the veggies really cook and develop flavor. Brown the vegetables if you want to. After the vegetables have softened and developed some fragrance and flavor, add about 4 cups of stock, cover and simmer. (Even water will do, in a pinch!) Simmer for about an hour or until all the vegetables are soft. Puree the soup in a blender or with an immersion blender for a creamy soup, if you like. Voilà! You have easy, flavorful vegetable soup.

To Puree or Not to Puree

When you cook vegetables in stock like this, you have a choice. You can stop cooking when the vegetables are al dente and tender, and slurp up your soup as it is — chunks and all, an improvised vegetable stew.

Or you can puree the soup until creamy. This works with any kind of soup, and you’ll be surprised at how creamy a soup can be with no dairy at all. But I tend to like this best with sweet, dense vegetables like squash and sweet potato.

It’s up to you — to puree or not to puree!

How To Make Soup from Any Vegetable

Serves 4 to 6

What You Need

Ingredients
1 to 2 pounds vegetables
Aromatics, such as onion, garlic, or leeks
Olive oil or unsalted butter
Salt and pepper
4 to 6 cups stock

Equipment
Cutting board
Chef’s knife
4-quart (or larger) pot or Dutch oven, with lid
Wooden spoon

Instructions

  1. Choose and weigh 1 to 2 pounds of vegetables: I had quite a lot of vegetables in my refrigerator. I chose the ones that needed to be used up the soonest: a small head of cauliflower, and some carrots. I weighed them and they came out to about 2 pounds, although I knew the cauliflower would break down to much less when trimmed.

  2. Cut up the vegetables and aromatics: I chopped up the trimmed cauliflower and unpeeled carrots into evenly-sized chunks. I also chopped up 1 leek and 2 cloves of garlic.

  3. Heat olive oil: I heated up about 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat.

Soup 101 Part 2

Choose Your Own Soup Adventure: Instead of olive oil, try butter, ghee, or coconut oil for sautéing the aromatics. Or start instead with chopped chicken thighs, or ground meat or lamb, and slowly render the fat then cook the aromatics. For aromatics, use a whole onion instead of the leeks, or add more garlic. Add finely diced fresh ginger, or chili peppers.

  1. Sauté aromatics: I added the leeks and garlic to the oil first and cooked gently .
    1. Cut up the vegetables and aromatics: I chopped up the trimmed cauliflower and unpeeled carrots into evenly-sized chunks. I also chopped up1 leek and 2 cloves of garlic.
    2. Heat olive oil: I heated up about 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat.

    3. Choose Your Own Soup Adventure: Instead of olive oil, try butter, ghee, or coconut oil for sautéing the aromatics. Or start instead with , chopped chicken thighs, or ground meat or lamb, and slowly render the fat then cook the aromatics. For aromatics, use a whole onion instead of the leeks, or add more garlic. Add finely diced fresh ginger, galangal, or chili peppers.

    1. Brown the vegetables: Then I added the chopped carrot and cauliflower and continued cooking for several minutes. The vegetables softened slightly and browned around the edges.
    2. Season the vegetables: It’s best to season the vegetables at this point, especially if you’re using low-sodium broth. Vegetables need salt and pepper, and if you are adding other seasonings such as spices or dried herbs, add them now so they flavor the soup from the ground up. I added about a half teaspoon each of cumin, chili powder, and smoked paprika.

    6-Choose Your Own Soup Adventure: To flavor the soup, raid your spice cupboard. Try curry powder, chili powder, cumin, cinnamon, or any other warm and toasty spices. Get creative with salt; try smoked salt or truffle salt. Add dried herbs such as mint, oregano, or sage.

    1. Add broth: Add 4 to 6 cups of broth and bring to a simmer. Add a sprig of fresh herbs now if desired.
    2. Cover and simmer: Turn the heat down to low and cover the pot. Let cook for about 30 minutes, then check the soup. Are the vegetables as soft as you would like? If you want to leave the vegetables intact, take the soup off the heat now. If you want the vegetables very soft for pureeing, keep cooking until they are falling apart.
    3. Taste and season: Whether you are leaving the vegetables intact or pureeing the soup, make sure to taste the soup as it finishes cooking. A bland soup is no one’s fault but the cook’s! If it seems flat, add some vinegar or lemon juice. If it is too salty, thin out with some extra broth or dairy.

    Choose Your Own Soup Adventure: Once the soup has finished cooking, you can jazz it up more, especially if you’re not pureeing it. Add the last handful of leftover cooked pasta or a few crumbles of cooked ground turkey or beef. Lay cooked strips of chicken breast on top of each bowl. Add a 1/4 cup of rice, quinoa, or another grain, and simmer until done. Add a can of beans, chickpeas, or tomatoes, and simmer until warmed through.

    1. Puree if desired: Once the vegetables are very soft, you can puree the soup in a blender or with a stick blender if you like. Rewarm gently after blending.

    Choose Your Own Soup Adventure: When pureeing the soup, you can add flavor and creaminess by adding beans, tofu, coconut milk, yogurt, or other dairy

    Sauté aromatics: I added the leeks and garlic to the oil first and cooked gently for about 5 minutes or until they were fragrant and soft. At any point you may use a pressure cooker.

Carrot, Celery & Potato Cream Soup

Prep time
10 mins
Cook time
30 mins
Total
40 mins
 Serves: 5

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp unsalted butter

  • 5 medium carrots, chopped

  • ½ yellow onion, chopped

  • 2 garlic cloves

  • 5 medium celery stalks, chopped

  • 2 large potatoes

  • 6 cups chicken broth

  • ½ cup half and half

  • 2 tsp oregano

  • 1 tsp pepper

  • 1 tsp parsley

Instructions

  1. Heat butter in a large stock pot over medium heat.

  2. Wash and chop celery and onion and toss into pot.

  3. Chop garlic cloves in half and add in. Simmer for 7 minutes covered.

  4. Wash, peel, and chop carrots and potatoes and add into pot.

Caution: Most Polluted Items in Israel from:http://www.adamteva.org.il/_Uploads/dbsAttachedFiles/Doch2.pdf

1חמישה עשר המזוהמים ענביםענבים 2 סלרי 3 תפוח  עץ 4 פירות הדר 5 סלק 6 כוסברה 7 שמיר 8 חסה 9 נענע 10 לקט עלי בייבי 11 אגס 12 קולרבי 13 אפרסק 14 תפו”א 15 פל

1. Grapes

2. Celery

3. Apples

4. Citrus fruits

5. Beets

6. Coriander

7. Dill

8. Lettuce

9. Mint

10. “Baby” greens

11. Pear

12. Kohlrabi

13. Peach

14. Potato

15. Pepper

Least polluted items:

1. Passion fruit

2. Avocado

3. Sprouts

4. Sweet potato

5. Onions

More advanced: Artichoke Prep:

To trim your artichokes:

Actually, before I get into the details of trimming, let’s just establish what we’re after. We’re after the tender. meaning, we want to trim any tough outer leaves, tips, and stem. We want to get down to the tender parts of the leaves, without trimming so much that we have little left. To start, trim the stem. Pull the outer leaves from the artichoke, until you get down to the more tender leaves.

Cut off the top of the artichoke (roughly where it begins to taper in), you want to remove the tough part of the tips. From here decide what shape you’d like your artichoke pieces to be. For this preparation, I cut each artichoke in halves, and/or quarters.

If you are using larger artichokes, ones that have developed a fuzzy choke, you’ll need to use a teaspoon (or mellon baller) to carve the fuzz out before moving on to your final cuts. Work efficiently, and get the trimmed artichokes in the lemon water as quickly as possible to reduce browning from oxidation.

While prepping the artichokes, bring a medium saucepan of water to a boil. Salt well, and use a slotted spoon to transfer them from the lemon water to the boiling water. Boil until just tender, typically a minute or two. Drain well, and set aside. Alternately, you can steam the artichokes – this will keep more of the nutrients .

Either way, you want the artichokes to be cooked tender (and feel free to eat them at this point)!

I can’t resist a bit of crust and crunch to them, so….

Heat a tablespoon of oil or clarified butter in a large saucepan over medium high heat. When hot, transfer the artichokes to the pan in a single layer. Toss to coat, and add a pinch or two of salt. Allow to saute, tossing every few minutes, until the artichokes are deeply golden and crusted.

You can enjoy these immediately, or at room temperature, or you can save them for a few day, refrigerated, in a coating of olive oil (drain before using)….

A few other notes:

Buying Artichokes: Your success here is going to depend on sourcing good artichokes. Look for tight, dense examples. This is a sign that they have been recently harvested. If you see the leaves have started to flower out, separate, or dry out, give them a pass.

Storage: Store artichokes in a bag in your refrigerator until ready to use. That said, try to use them quickly – within few days of purchase. The sooner the better.

Add-ins: This technique makes beautiful artichokes in their own right, but occasionally I like to flare them out with other things I have on hand. they have a great affinity for olives, orange zest, chopped almonds, chile flakes, fennel, anise, and lemon oil.

Great-on: Once you have a skillet of these, you can eat them on their own, or use them in/on all sorts of things. This artichoke season I’ve had them on farro risotto, quinoa, frittata, pureed cauliflower soup, and chopped into a ravioli filling. As I’m typing this, I’m imagining they’d be amazing as a component in a dumpling filling, or spring roll.

Prep time: 15 min – Cook time: 10 min

I cut off any protruding stem but don’t do any more trimming than that, then simply steam them covered. Next to the pot I place an oven-save dish with a little butter in it, which melts while they cook about an hour. You can’t eat the entire leaves, of course, but that means you have a handle (the top, inedible part of the leaf) for dipping in the melted butter! The heart is the best part, and just needs to have the hair scraped off and be cut up (and of course dipped in the butter).

IMG_20160319_222953
I purchased these chokes in the shuk for about $ .25 a lb. or 2 sh/kilo. The man next to me advised me  to buy when the tips are closed.

What You’ll Need:

For the Sauce

1 Medium Yellow Onion (chopped)

5 Garlic Cloves (thinly sliced)

3 Medium Celery Roots (peeled and sliced)

1 TSP. Ground Turmeric

Dash of Paprika (regular & hot), Coriander, S&P

Juice from 1 medium Lemon

2 C. Filtered Water

For the Artichoke Hearts

20 Frozen Artichoke Hearts (defrosted)

Juice from 1 large Lemon

For the Meat Filling

500-600 Grams of Ground Beef (shoulder)

Drizzle of Olive Oil

1 Medium Yellow Onion (minced)

3-5 Garlic Cloves (minced)

1 Large Parsley Root, small piece of yam, and celery root (grated)

1 C. Chopped Parsley

1/2 C. Pine Nuts

1/3 C. Pistachios (coarsely ground)

Paprika (regular & hot), Coriander, S&P, to taste

METHOD:

Place the frozen artichoke hearts in a very large bowl, and cover with lukewarm water, and lemon juice, until fully defrosted (about 35 min).

Drizzle olive oil in a large saucepan and heat over a medium flame. Add onion, garlic, celery root and spices (in that order, wait 3-5 minutes before adding the next ingredient). Add lemon juice and water and cook on medium-low heat for 25 min or until the sauce becomes slightly concentrated.

While the sauce is cooking, prepare the meat mixture: in a separate frying pan, heat olive oil over a medium flame. Add onion, garlic, pine nuts and parsley (in that order, wait 3-5 minutes before adding the next ingredient). Remove from heat and add to a large bowl. To the same bowl add the ground beef,  grated root-vegetable mixture, ground pistachios, and spices.  Mix with your hands (this is the best way) until all the ingredients are incorporated. Then stuff the hollow part of the artichokes with the meat filling. There might be a little bit meat left over (depending on how much or little you fill your hearts), in that case, make a few small meatballs to add to the saucepan.

Before you add your artichoke hearts to the saucepan that the lemony sauce has been cooking in, remove about half the amount of sauce and put in a separate cup. Add the stuffed artichoke hearts to the saucepan, and then pour the remaining liquid evenly over them. Cover the saucepan and cook for 1 1/2 hours on medium-low heat.

Serve hot with extra sauce.

kabcphotography.wordpress.com/2012/02/16/imas-stuffed-artichoke-hearts/

Thanks Ima for sharing this great recipe!

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