Monthly Archives: May 2016

Post 311: How to change a Jones Strait skirt with back slit into an A-Line with closed pleat: Shaare Tzedek Dr’s Rap about washing hands, Ralph Dobrin June Events file:///Users/idafarkash/Downloads/JUNE2016.pdf, AMAZING – Fill your Rav Kav at home!!! Also Egyptian-German Scholar Hamed Abdel-Samad: Our Hatred of Jews Has Poisoned Us, whole wheat waffles

How to change a Jones Strait skirt with back slit into an A-Line with closed pleat:

You must be familiar with the Jones 100% cotton straight skirt with two pockets front and back, resembling  men’s trousers. Only the back slit reached up to the back of the knee.

The skirt should be slightly large in the back.

Here’s the secret of how to turn it into an A-Line.

Start by cutting off  a bottom section from the skirt. The size should be about the same as the maximum A that you want your skirt to flair out

1-Start by opening the side and back seams . The side one up to where your hip is attached to your torso. Open the back middle seam to almost the waist.

You will have essentially cut from the bottom a long rectangle when you open one of the shorter seams. This project involves a lot of seam ripping. Just be patient. You will fold the long piece into two rectangles and then cut 4 right triangles.

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You can see the diagolal representing the shape of one of the triangle.

2- Iron the triangles as flat as possible.

3- Sew the side seam to the triangle to create the “A”.

4. Press the seams open. Sew the front sections to the back sections.

5- Sew the back seam taking in as much as possible so that you are able to use the remaining open bottom into a closed kick pleat.

6- Press seams open.

7- Voila! 4 pocket A line skirt that is very nice especially in navy blue. Mine is already dusty from sitting  out on our roof garden. The A looks exaggerated , but it fits nicely.The back pleat is on the next photo. As you can see with the extra material one can close up a slit.wp-1464710338960.jpegwp-1464710221427.jpeg

I may not be attending any of the events below: Ralph Dobrin is originally from South Africa. He is a good friend.

For people who care about Israel, use the link to find events of interest. file:///Users/idafarkash/Downloads/JUNE2016.pdf

Also Egyptian-German Scholar Hamed Abdel-Samad: Our Hatred of Jews Has Poisoned Us

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6dcrCf0Z1w

 

To put smiles on your faces: (this one is great!)

Shaare Zedek Doctors Rap

This is so cute.

It’s happening, The AACI’s Spring Yard Sale, it’s one week away……..Nothing like shopping to get your mind off of things.

AACI’s Annual Yard Sale, will take place on June 3rd 08:30 to 12:30 at the AACI’s offices on 37 Pierre Koenig corner of 2 Poaley Zedek in Talpiyot.

 Spread the word and come with a friend and neighbor.

The location is : at AACI Glassman Family Center, Pierre Koenig 37, Talpiot. For directions or further information, please call 02-566-1181.

Come One Come All!

The newest Jerusalem attraction in the Mamilla Mall invites you to come and celebrate Yom Yerushalayim as you watch the multidimensional movie “I am Jerusalem” for FREE.

Feel like you are riding the Light Rail, fly over Jerusalem landmarks and meet some of the people who make up the multicultural landscape.

10:00am-10:00pm

Tickets must be purchased in advance. They will sell out quickly.

http://www.funinjerusalem.com/i-am-jerusalem/

 

Sun May 29, 2016 11:08 am (PDT) . Posted by:

“Rivka Shore” dovandrivka

I bought a small device at the tachana mercazit last week. It is called a
mitkan USB. You plug it into your computer at home and you can refill your
Rav Kavs at home with a credit card. You can check how many rides are left
on a Rav Kav and even see the last several buses it was used on. This is
such a great thing for anyone but especially for parents. (I’m sure I’m the
only one whose kids tell them last minute that they are out of rides, but
just in case this happens to you, this could be the answer).I bought it at the rav kav store in the tachana mercazit (I don’t know if
the one in Rav Shefa also has them or not) and it was only 10 shekel!! You
can buy all types of rides from all the companies (not just Egged). Just
one other thing to know. Apparently it only reads the “newer” cards with
the golden chip in them. Most of ours have been replaced since they first
came out so they all have that.This was just too good to keep to myself. I had to share with you all.Rivka Shore
thestoryofababy.blogspot.co.il

Whole Wheat Waffles

1 cup | 4.5 oz | 120 g whole wheat flour
2 cups | 9 oz | 225 g all-purpose flour

1/2 cup | 1.75 oz | 50 g rolled oats or 1/2 cup | 1.5 oz | 40 g wheat germ

4 oz | 110 g organic cornstarch or rice flour or walnut flour or potato starch
2 teaspoons fine-grain sea salt-can omit
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoons baking soda
4 cups | 1 L buttermilk-or can use Greek Yoghurt, or goat milk
1/2 cup | 4 oz | 115 g butter, melted and cooled-I would do half butter
4 eggs, separated

Preheat the oven to 225°F | 110°C. Combine the flours, oats, cornstarch or substitite, salt, baking powder, and baking soda in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, melted butter, and egg yolks. In a third bowl, using an egg beater or an electric mixer, beat the egg whites into stiff peaks.

Heat the waffle maker, and when it is ready, add the buttermilk mixture to the dry ingredients and stir until the mixture just starts to come together. Dollop the egg whites across the top of the batter and fold until uniform, using a few strokes as possible.

Use a scoop to ladle the batter into your waffle iron and cook until deeply golden and crisp. Transfer to the warm oven while you make the remaining waffles–the dry heat of the oven helps them set a bit. Any leftover batter will keep for a day or so, refrigerated.

Makes 16 Belgian-style waffles.

From Near & Far: Recipes Inspired by Home & Travel.

 

 

Post 310: Ladies in Williamsburg protest when separate swimming hours in NYC Public Williamsburg Pools are abrogated. Neighborhood residents began a large-scale public campaign to improve the quality of life in our region. Ateret Kalah Tamir Hall Wednesday June 1st

It’s the summer and ladies have to swim: http://nypost.com/2016/05/27/proposal-to-end-womens-only-pool-hours-nixed-after-backlash/

I’m talking about Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The ladies are not about to let their hours in the pool be stolen. What do Jews do? They picket and call their representatives. And the ladies got their hours back!

In Jerusalem City Center, a campaign has been going on to impress upon Mayor Barkat, the necessity to preserve the quality of life in Mircaz Ha”Ir. Watch the video and see a lady who lives in the section of Machanah Yehuda’s residences. The buildings are very old as are most of the residents.

Over the past the city administration together with neighborhood residents began a large-scale public, grass-roots campaign to improve the quality of life in our region, Nachlaot, and Mircaz Ha”Ir. Among other things, the green flags signaled the resident’s protest. Articles in national newspapers and local news provided coverage on radio and television, including last week’s main news broadcast of Channel 2:

http://www.mako.co.il/news-israel/local-q2_2016/Article-d5b26d90af3e451004.htm

It is recommended to watch the story, to share and to continue to spread concern about the issue of security, about what is happening in the market and the various neighborhoods in the city.

Lag B’Omer Fashion Show: Last part of Post

This past Thursday was Bon Fire Day, L’ag B’Omer is the date of the Yahrzeit of Rav Shimon Bar Yochai. Hundred’s of thousands of visitors take over Miron, to pray at his Kever.

Lag BaOmer is Hebrew for “33rd [day] in the Omer“. (According to gematria, the Hebrew letter ל (lamed) or “L” has the numerical value of 30 and ג (gimmel) or “G” has the numerical value of 3. A vowel sound is conventionally added for pronunciation purposes.)

Some Jews call this holiday Lag LaOmer, which means “33rd [day] of the Omer”, as opposed to Lag BaOmer, “33rd [day] in the Omer”. Lag BaOmer is the traditional method of counting by some Ashkenazi and Hasidic Jews; Lag LaOmer is the count used by Sephardi Jews. Lag LaOmer is also the name used by Yosef Karo, who was a Sepharadi, in his Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chaim 493:2, and cf. 489:1 where BaOmer is inserted. (The form Lag B’Omer [“33rd day of an Omer”] is also sometimes used, though it is not grammatically correct in this setting.) The Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, writes in his Likkutei Sichos that a deeper reason for the term Lag BaOmer is that the Hebrew words Lag BaOmer (ל״ג בעמר, spelled without the “vav“), have the same gematria as Moshe (משה, Moses). He writes that Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai, whose yahrzeit is traditionally observed on this day, was mystically a spark of the soul of Moses.

Origins

Entrance to the tomb of Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai and his son, RabbiEleazar.

The origins of Lag BaOmer as a minor festival are unclear. The date is mentioned explicitly for the first time in the 13th century by the Talmudist Meiri in his gloss to Yevamot 62b. The Talmudic passage states that during the time of Rabbi Akiva, 24,000 of his students died from a divinely-sent plague during the counting of the Omer. The Talmud goes on to say that this was because they did not show proper respect to one another. Meiri named Lag BaOmer as the day when, “according to a tradition of the geonim“, the “plague” ended.

After the death of Rabbi Akiva’s 24,000 students, he was left with only five students, among them Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai. The latter went on to become the greatest teacher of Torah in his generation, and is purported to have authored the Zohar, a landmark text of Jewish mysticism. The Zohar calls the day of Bar Yochai’s death a hillula.

Rabbi Chaim Vital, the main disciple of Rabbi Isaac Luria and author of Etz Chaim, was the first to name Lag BaOmer as the date of Bar Yochai’s hillula. According to the Zohar (III, 287b–296b), on the day of Bar Yochai’s death, he revealed the deepest secrets of the Kabbalah. Lag BaOmer therefore became a day of celebration of the great light (i.e., wisdom) that Bar Yochai brought into the world.

Nachman Krochmal, a 19th-century Jewish theologian, among others, suggests that the deaths of Rabbi Akiva’s students was a veiled reference to the defeat of “Akiva’s soldiers” by the Romans, and that Lag BaOmer was the day on which Bar Kokhba enjoyed a brief victory.

During the Middle Ages, Lag BaOmer became a special holiday for rabbinical students and was called “Scholar’s Day.” It was customary to rejoice on this day through outdoor sports.

Kabbalistic significance

Lag BaOmer has another significance based on the Kabbalistic custom of assigning a Sefirah to each day and week of the Omer count. The first week corresponds to Chesed, the second week to Gevurah, etc., and similarly, the first day of each week corresponds to Chesed, the second day to Gevurah, etc. Thus, the 33rd day, which is the fifth day of the fifth week, corresponds to Hod she-be-Hod (Splendor within [the week of] Splendor).

As such, Lag BaOmer represents the level of spiritual manifestation or Hod that would precede the more physical manifestation of the 49th day (Malkhut she-be-Malkhut, Kingship within [the week of] Kingship), which immediately precedes the holiday of Shavuot.

Customs and practices

The tomb of Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai in Meron on Lag BaOmer.

While the Counting of the Omer is a semi-mourning period, all restrictions of mourning are lifted on this 33rd day of the Omer. As a result, weddings, parties, listening to music, and haircuts are commonly scheduled to coincide with this day among Ashkenazi Jews. Families go on picnics and outings. Children go out to the fields with their teachers with bows and rubber-tipped arrows. Tachanun, the prayer for special Divine mercy on one’s behalf is not said, because when God is showing one a “smiling face,” so to speak, as He does especially on the holidays, there is no need to ask for special mercy.

The Sephardi custom is to continue mourning practices through the 33rd day of the Omer and celebrate on the 34th day of the Omer, or LaD BaOmer

Bonfires

Israeli boys collect wood for a Lag BaOmer bonfire.

A wood pile awaiting Lag Baomer celebration.

Another wood pile along the wadi near Rechov Sorotzkin street in Jerusalem.

The most well-known custom of Lag BaOmer is the lighting of bonfires throughout Israel and worldwide wherever religious Jews can be found. In Meron, the burial place of Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai and his son, RabbiEleazar, hundreds of thousands of Jews gather throughout the night and day to celebrate with bonfires, torches, song and feasting. This was a specific request by Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai of his students. Some say that as bar Yochai gave spiritual light to the world with the revelation of the Zohar, bonfires are lit to symbolize the impact of his teachings. As his passing left such a “light” behind, many candles and/or bonfires are lit.

The Bnei Yissaschar cites another reason for the lighting of bonfires. On the day of his death, Rabbi Shimon Bar Yochai said, “Now it is my desire to reveal secrets… The day will not go to its place like any other, for this entire day stands within my domain…” Daylight was miraculously extended until Rabbi Shimon had completed his final teaching and died. This symbolized that all light is subservient to spiritual light, and particularly to the primeval light contained within the mystical teachings of the Torah. As such, the custom of lighting fires symbolizes this revelation of powerful light.

At the tomb of Rabbi Shimon, the honor of lighting the main bonfire traditionally goes to the Rebbes of the Boyaner dynasty. This privilege was purchased by Rabbi Avrohom Yaakov Friedman, the first Sadigura Rebbe, from the Sephardi guardians of Meron and Safed. The Sadigura Rebbe bequeathed this honor to his eldest son, Rabbi Yitzchok Friedman, the first Boyaner Rebbe, and his progeny. The first hadlakah (lighting) is attended by hundreds of thousands of people annually; in 2001, the crowd was estimated at 300,000.

In 1983 Rabbi Levi Yitzchak Horowitz, the second Bostoner Rebbe, reinstated a century-old tradition among Bostoner Hasidim to light a bonfire near the grave of Rabbi Akiva in Tiberias on Lag BaOmer night. The tradition had been abandoned due to murderous attacks on participants in the isolated location. After the bonfire, the Rebbe delivered a dvar Torah, gave blessings, and distributed shirayim. Later that same night, the Rebbe cut the hair of three-year-old boys for their Upsherin.

For many years, Rabbi Aaron Teitelbaum of Satmar made it clear to his students that it was not customary outside of the Holy Land of Israel to make bonfires, and he discouraged the students in his yeshiva from lighting bonfires on Lag BaOmer.[15]However, in 2000, his father, Rabbi Moses Teitelbaum, the then-Grand Rabbi of Satmar, instructed his son to make a large bonfire in the Satmar enclave of Kiryas Joel, New York, on the night of Lag BaOmer.[16] In 2012 the Lag BaOmer bonfire in Kiryas Joel drew an estimated 50,000 participants.

According to Zionist ideology (see section below), the bonfires are said to represent the signal fires that the Bar Kokhba rebels lit on the mountaintops to relay messages,[or are in remembrance of the Bar Kochba revolt against the Romans, who had forbidden the kindling of fires that signaled the start of Jewish holidays.

Chai rotel

Another custom at the tomb of Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai is the giving of chai rotel (Hebrew: ח״י רוטל‎‎). The Hebrew letters chet and yod are the gematria (numerical equivalent) of 18. Rotel is a liquid measure of about 3 liters. Thus, 18 rotels equals 54 liters or about 13 gallons. It is popularly believed that if one donates or offers 18 rotels of liquid refreshment (grape juice, wine, soda or even water) to those attending the celebrations at bar Yochai’s tomb on Lag BaOmer, then the giver will be granted miraculous salvation.

According to Taamei Minhagim, many childless couples found success with this segula (propitious practice). This practice was also endorsed by Rabbi Ovadia miBartenura[19] and The Shelah HaKadosh. The Bobover Rebbe, Rabbi Ben Zion Halberstam, sent a letter from Poland to his Hasidim in Israel asking them to donate chai rotel in Meron on this holy day on behalf of a couple that did not have children. Several local organizations solicit donations of chai rotel and hand out the drinks on the donor’s behalf in Meron on Lag BaOmer. Nine months after Lag BaOmer, the Ohel Rashbi organization even invites couples who prayed at the tomb and had a child to come back to Meron to celebrate the births.

First haircut for children

A rabbi performs the traditional first haircut on a 3-year-old boy in Meron on Lag Baomer 1970.

It is customary at the Meron celebrations, dating from the time of Rabbi Isaac Luria, that three-year-old boys be given their first haircuts (upsherin), while their parents distribute wine and sweets. Similar upsherin celebrations are simultaneously held in Jerusalem at the grave of Shimon Hatzaddik for Jerusalemites who cannot travel to Meron.

Bows and arrows

Historically, children across Israel used to go out and play with bows and arrows, reflecting the Midrashic statement that the rainbow (the sign of God’s promise to never again destroy the earth with a flood; Genesis 9:11-13) was not seen during Bar Yochai’s lifetime, as his merit protected the world.

In Israel, Lag BaOmer is a holiday for children and the various youth movements. It is also marked in the Israel Defense Forces as a week of the Gadna program (youth brigades) which were established on Lag BaOmer in 1941 and which bear the emblem of a bow and arrow.

Weddings

Lag BaOmer is a popular day for weddings among Ashkenazi Jews (Sephardi Jews hold weddings on Lad BaOmer, the 34th day of the Omer). For those who do not conduct celebrations between Pesach and Lag BaOmer, the date often marks the first opportunity for a wedding in the spring or early summer.

Parades

A Lag BaOmer parade in front of Chabad headquarters at 770 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York, in 1987.

The Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, encouraged Lag BaOmer parades to be held in Jewish communities around the world as a demonstration of Jewish unity and pride. Chabad sponsors parades as well as rallies, bonfires and barbecues for thousands of participants around the world each year.

Songs

Several traditional songs are associated with the holiday; these are sung around bonfires, at weddings, and at tishen held by Hasidic Rebbes on Lag BaOmer. The popular song “Bar Yochai” was composed by Rabbi Shimon Labi (c.1490-c.1584), a 16th-century kabbalist, in honor of Shimon Bar Yochai.[26][27] Other songs include “Ve’Amartem Koh LeChai“, a poem arranged as an alphabetical acrostic, and “Amar Rabbi Akiva“.

Tish

Most Hasidic Rebbes conduct a tish on Lag BaOmer, in addition to or instead of a bonfire. A full meal is usually served, and candles are lit. It is traditional to sing “Bar Yochai“, “Ve’Amartem Koh Lechai“, and “Amar Rabbi Akiva“. In Satmar, “Tzama Lecha Nafshi” is sung at the tish in addition to the other songs. Teachings of Rabbi Shimon Bar Yochai, both from the Talmud and the Zohar, are generally expounded upon by Rebbes at their tishen. In some Hasidic courts, the Rebbe may shoot a toy bow and arrow during the tish, and three-year-old boys may be brought to have a lock of hair cut by the Rebbe as part of their first haircut.

Bar Kokhba revolt

A first-grade classroom in Tel Aviv in 1973 with holiday displays; the Lag BaOmer display showing Bar Kokhba is at left.

In modern Israel, early Zionists redefined Lag BaOmer from a rabbinic-oriented celebration to a commemoration of the Bar Kokhba revolt against the Roman Empire (132–136 CE). According to work published by Yael Zerubavel of Rutgers University, a number of Lag BaOmer traditions were reinterpreted by Zionist ideologues to focus on the victory of the Bar Kokhba rebels rather than their ultimate defeat at Betar three years later. The plague that decimated Rabbi Akiva’s 24,000 disciples was explained as a veiled reference to the revolt; the 33rd day when the plague ended was explained as the day of Bar Kokhba‘s victory. By the late 1940s, Israeli textbooks for schoolchildren painted Bar Kokhba as the hero while Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai and Rabbi Akiva stood on the sidelines, cheering him on. This interpretation lent itself to singing and dancing around bonfires by night to celebrate Bar Kokhba’s victory, and playing with bows and arrows by day to remember the actions of Bar Kokhba’s rebel forces.

This Zionist interpretation of history came at a time when Jewish paramilitary groups were fighting for control of what they saw as their historic homeland. As Benjamin Lau writes in Haaretz:

This is how Lag Ba’omer became a part of the Israeli-Zionist psyche during the first years of Zionism and Israel. A clear distinction became evident between Jews and Israelis (sic) in the way the day was celebrated: The religious Jews lit torches in Rashbi’s [Shimon bar Yochai’s] honor and sang songs about him, while young Israelis, sitting around an alternative bonfire, sang about a hero “whom the entire nation loved” and focused on the image of a powerful hero who galloped on a lion in his charges against the Romans.

In modern Israel, Lag BaOmer is “a symbol for the fighting Jewish spirit”. The Palmach division of the Haganah was established on Lag BaOmer 1941, and the government order creating the Israel Defense Forces was issued on Lag BaOmer 1948. Beginning in 2004, the Israeli government designated Lag BaOmer as the day for saluting the IDF reserves.

I want to remember the traditions related  Rev Shimon. I happened upon a Fashion Show, I guess a parade of sorts.

 

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The Runner was set up in front of the entrance to our friend’s courtyard. I passed under the dividing rope and rang our friend’s bell and opened the bulky doors;wp-1464545712731.jpeg

  Ateret Kalah; Wednesday June 1st Tamir Hall

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4kxWoV0Y50ycXQ4Y2NkaF81elBzRjJWT3hIMUEzbzNEZFI4/view

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gmail-

Post 309: Jerusalem Light festival http://allaboutjerusalem.com/event/jerusalem-light-festival-2012 Installations by outstanding light artists from Israel and abroad: dynamic arches, colorful/musical water fountains, three-dimensional light displays, http://postfoods.com/recipes/apple-raisin-bran-muffins

In Jerusalem’s Old City, May 25-June 2 

  

תוצאות חיפוש

תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏

לפני 2 ימים
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏

לפני 2 ימים
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏

לפני 2 ימים
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏

לפני 2 ימים
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏

לפני 2 ימים
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏

לפני 2 ימים
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏

לפני 2 ימים
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏

לפני יום 1
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏

לפני 3 ימים
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏

לפני 2 ימים
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏

לפני 2 ימים
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏

לפני 2 ימים
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photos Jerusalem light  festival 2016‬‏

1-Installations by outstanding light artists from Israel and abroad: dynamic arches, colorful/musical water fountains, and three-dimensional light displays.

2-Spectacular three-dimensional video installation by the world-renowned artist and audience favorite at the Lyon, France Festival of Lights, Damien Fontaine.

 3-In honor of Lag B’OmerLarge Fire Tornado by the internationally-acclaimed artist Ivo Schoofs: a 12 meter high fire installation!

 4-Debut of a unique Pyromania musical production, and other musical events along the Festival’s four trails!                                                                                    

The Festival, an initiative of the Jerusalem Development Authority, the Jerusalem Municipality, the Ministry of Jerusalem Affairs and Heritage, and Eden – the Jerusalem Center Development Company, is managed and produced by Ariel Municipal Company. 

The Festival is suitable for all ages – admission is free.

The Festival of Light 2016, a major international event centered around inspiring works of light art, will be held for the eighth consecutive year in Jerusalem’s Old City, from May 25-June 2, 2016. Festival-goers will be treated to a thrilling multi-sensory experience, in which the familiar public realm comes alive with light and color. The Festival is an initiative of the Jerusalem Development Authority, the Jerusalem Municipality, the Ministry of Jerusalem Affairs and Heritage, and Eden – the Jerusalem Center Development Company; it is managed and produced by Ariel Municipal Company. Eduardo Hübscher is the Festival’s artistic director.

Locations:

The Armenian Patriarchate corner will serve as a performance venue for Pyromania, a surrealistic, luminous circus orchestra, in which five musicians embark on a procession of light and rhythm. The procession halts and collects an audience around it – festival-goers inspired to dance within the celebration of light – and then moves on to the next stop. The show, which is premiering at the Festival, will be performed several times each evening. In addition, an array of unusual musical light events will surprise visitors as they make their way along the four Festival trails.

The Festival, which has earned an international reputation and is now one of the world’s most highly-regarded light festivals, will host leading Israeli artists known for their exceptional light creations, alongside such renowned international artists as Philip Artos, Damien Fontaine, Ivo Schoofs, David Lesort, Arnaud Giroud, Gloria Ronchi, Claudio Benghi, Alessandro Lupi, Ocubo, Aleksandra Stratimirovic, Maro Avrabou, Dmitri Xenakis, and more!

The audience will be invited to participate in the experience and to enjoy dozens of breathtaking light installations along the four color-coded Festival trails – white, red, blue and green – that extend across the entire Old City and lead visitors from site to site and from artwork to artwork.

 

CEO of Ariel Municipal Company, Zion Turgeman: “We at Ariel Municipal Company produce dozens of international culture and tourism events each year, at the Jerusalem Payis Arena, Sultan’s Pool, and throughout the city, including the Old City. But the Festival of Light is held in such a high degree of artistic esteem around the world that it attracts light artists of the first rank from abroad, who are inspired anew each year by the challenge of mounting spectacular installations that surpass those of the previous year. We join the Mayor in inviting the entire Israeli public and tourists from around the world to come and enjoy Jerusalem’s tourism and cultural offerings, including its exceptional Light Festival experience.”

Some of this year’s major installations:

In honor of Lag B’Omer – Large Fire Tornado  by the internationallyacclaimed IvoSchoofs, the Netherlands: a huge, 12 meter high fire installation featuring a gigantic flame: 36 fans generate a tornado of fire!

Colorful Water Fountains – by Gundega Chekola, Latvia: a mesmerizing show featuring colorful fountains that rise to towering heights and dance to musical accompaniment.

The Little Prince – by Damien Fontaine, France: A stunningly beautiful video mapping by Damien Fontaine, winner of the Audience Favorite Award  at the Lyon, France Festival of Light, to be projected on the façade of the Christian Information Center building.

Universal Spin – by artist Alessandro Lupi, Germany: A 9 meter high kinetic sculpture that changes with light. Made mostly of wood, charged with glints of light that create different perceptual states: ever-changing interactions of light and shadow that make the entire installation at once visible and invisible, ancient and futuristic.

Colorful Origami – by Gloria Ronchi and Claudio Benghi, UK: An installation that draws its inspiration from pleasant childhood memories. The aesthetically compelling design consists of tens of handmade origami shapes bearing dynamic LED lights, making for an enchanted, richly imaginative experience.

Green Marvelous Abundance – by Maro Avrabou and Dmitri Xenakis, France: Breathtakingly beautiful “cabbages” of light, arranged in crates. The artists use plastic bags, folded for recycling purposes, to create a perfect illusion of living plants.

The Bubble  – by Ido Sapir and Noa Kressel, Israel:  A voice-operated game produced by its participants.

Globoscope – Maxime Houot – Collectif Coin, France: A work consisting of a large number of luminescent spheres arranged within a space, which produce an ever-changing, multi-sensory experience. The installation, which was displayed for the first time in 2014 at the Lyon, France Festival of Light, uses technical means to produce a digitalized recreation of a space.

The trails:

White Trail

Illuminated Arches (Aquastell), David Lesort and Arnaud Giroud, Pitaya, France – Jaffa Gate Outside Plaza: A huge installation made up of dynamic light arches. The arrangement of the arches gives viewers several different vantage points, from close range to the broader picture as seen from afar. The different lighting scenarios alter the installation’s character, making it look like water jets, or like shooting stars. The light passes through the arches in an ever-changing flow of energy. The entire installation fills the space, but remains very light and elegant.

A Moment with Water Fountains (Jaffa Gate Fountains), Gundega Chekola, Latvia – Jaffa Gate Plaza: A mesmerizing show in which colorful, towering fountains of water dance to musical accompaniment. Not to be missed!

The Little Prince, Gloria Ronchi and Claudio Benghi, UK – Armenian Patriarchate Street: “Colorful Origami” draws its inspiration from pleasant childhood memories. The aesthetically compelling design consists of tens of handmade origami shapes bearing dynamic LED lights, making for an enchanted, richly imaginative experience. The installation creates stunning, varied light effects – enthrallingly beautiful waves and arches and a magnificent light display.

Pyromania – Illuminated Orchestra at the Patriarchate Corner: The Armenian Patriarchate Corner will serve as a performance venue for Pyromania, a surrealistic, luminous circus orchestra clothed in sculptural elements of light and illuminated musical instruments. The Pyromania ensemble will appear in a unique show woven of music and light, created especially for the Festival, with several performances per evening. In addition, an array of unusual musical light events will surprise visitors as they make their way along the four Festival trails.

Universal Spin, Alessandro Lupi, Germany – back of Zion Gate: A 9 meter high kinetic sculpture that changes with light. Made mostly of wood, charged with glints of light that create different perceptual states: constantly-changing interactions of light and shadow that make the entire installation at once visible and invisible, ancient and futuristic.

Flora, Philip Artos, France – Hatekuma Garden: In the Flora Abstract Lines interactive animation work, the audience creates complex and subtle shapes that resemble plants. Viewers interactively control the animation via touch screen, thereby shaping the emerging forms. In Flora, the animation is generated by sinus waves that pass through a series of lines. The wave principle appears frequently in nature, as when energy passes through a medium such as air or water. This is also visible in the movement of animals, as kinetic energy passing through their joints. In this sense, Flora imitates a basic principle of nature in order to create innumerable variations of pleasing shapes. The aesthetic outcome is a happy combination of scientific precision and mischievous unpredictability.

Picture in Motion, by AVS – Hurva Synagogue, Hurva Square

A musical-visual dialogue in which the four seasons of the year are represented via projections on the synagogue wall, alongside a robot with a plasma screen that functions as a solo dancer. The robot’s dance around the plaza is synchronized with the projected image, affording attendees a close-range view of the wonders of nature.

Urban Poetry – 3D video mapping, by Okobo, Portugal – Batei HaMachseh Square: Stereoscopic video mapping, featuring the use of 3D glasses. The story conveyed by the installation is that of an urban place where a mysterious person (dancer) moves by parkour, using the building’s architectural elements. The struggle between the person, who is also a dancer/ traceur, and the city creates highly lyrical scenes that integrate hard urban elements with natural ones. The figure links the hard urban context with the natural elements. By appropriating the city environment, the person shows viewers a way of life that is based on resilience, overcoming problems, and pushing the envelope of one’s imagination! 

Red Trail 

Dormition Abbey by Gil Teichman, Israel: Breathtaking light movement and a live performance on the church balcony, combined in a single experience. On the adjacent bell tower, light and color images will be projected in a delicate, harmonically sophisticated interplay of color, light and sound. On the narrow street leading away from the church, the audience will be invited to enter physically into a space of light defined by a ceiling of dynamic light rings of different sizes, in an embrace encompassing a range of hues and movements of light.

The Bubble, by Ido Sapir and Noa Kressel, AVS, Israel – HaBonim Garden: Within a bowl, the bubble conducts an interaction with other bubbles that have been released into it; it collides, connects or explodes bubbles that are too large. In the present age, more and more interfaces that were once operated via pushbuttons, remote control devices or keyboards, are now activated by touch, motion, distance, etc. The Bubble project is a voice-operated game produced by its participants.

Northern Lights, by Aleksandra Stratimirovic, Sweden – HaBonim Garden:

An installation produced by the Amsterdam Light Festival that simulates the northern lights (the Aurora Borealis) – the most spectacular and poetic light phenomenon of the Northern Hemisphere. This is a phenomenon that has been astonishing people for thousands of years and inspired tribes who witnessed it to mythical stories. If you want to see it with your own eyes, you must travel to the northernmost points of Sweden or Norway. It may take patience though, because the northern light does not always show itself. In Jerusalem we can enjoy the northern lights during the entire period of the festival, via the work of art created by Swedish light artist Aleksandra Stratimirovic. To this pioneer of light art, the northern lights phenomenon symbolizes friendship. By installing the already existing work in Jerusalem, she hopes to convey this idea to the public. The breathtaking work extents itself across the Habonim Garden in the Old City and is programmed in such a way that an unpredictable curtain of light is created. Just like the real northern lights, this work conveys a magical experience.

Reflection of Co-Existence, by Kokhavi and Klein, Israel:

The installation is an environmental sculpture that symbolizes both ongoing change and a sense of entrapment along a central axis. Two rings of light complement each other while the light reflected from them differs. When viewers move away and look at the work from a distance, they see how everything can be integrated to create beauty and co-existence.

Blue Trail

Green Marvelous Opulence, by Maro Avrabou and Dmitri Xenakis, France – Maronite Convent Street: Breathtakingly beautiful “cabbages” of light, arranged in crates. The artists use plastic bags, folded for recycling purposes, to create a perfect illusion of living plants.

Sachrur, by Pogara, Israel – Maronite Convent Street: The installation investigates urban life as a perennial quest for the unattainable, and uses light as a raw material: it is a light fixture in motion, made up of stainless steel cuttings by means of which shapes and shadows are projected on the walls, like graffiti. Sachrur reacts to the movement of passersby, and translates the visitors’ motions into living beings of light along the alley.

 

Lamps of Muristan, Eli Kaplan and Talya Tomer, Israel – Muristan Square: Two huge Victorian lampshades, delicately decorated by hand, will light up Muristan Square and the work of the market’s craftsmen and vendors. Originally created as protection from the harmful effects of a new invention – the electric light bulb – today these lampshades hearken back to an earlier, simpler age when handiwork was common – as it still is in the market around this square.

Cirque du Cardo – Cardo Circus, Yossi Jimmy and Elian Kaczka – Lula, Israel – Covered Cardo: The artist Elian Kaczka -Lula is creating 5 spectacular sculptures entirely of corrugated cardboard, which will come to life in a multitude of colors and shapes when a video designed and animated by multimedia artist Yossi Jimmy is projected onto them. These breathtaking cardboard/video sculptures will bathe the Cardo – the ancient and eternal market – in bold circus-inspired colors, filling the space with color, aroma and sound.

Crystallized, Jonathan Richer and David Chanel – Theoriz, France – Covered Cardo:Crystallized is an audio-visual sculpture using the principle of volumetric projection. The installation, with its geometric proportions based on crystalline materials, like a bismuth crystal, diffuses a soundscape and video reflections. The 6 meter wide sculpture invites the public to contemplate it and wander around it.

Tree of Life, Alon Birger, Israel – Open Cardo:

In Kabbalah, the Tree of Life represents the process and secrets of Creation.

Sometimes, in relation to the sephirot, Rabbi Kook used the concept of light, which underscores the spiritual dimension of the sephirot and the process by which they unfold and emanate from each other. The sephirot answer a major philosophical and theological question – how can there be a link between the infinite and the finite? After all, man cannot understand or grasp an infinite concept that has no limit or definition. In Sefer Yetzirah, an important source for understanding the sephirot, it is written that the sephirot are “ten without end.” 

Green Trail

Traffic Jam! – OGE Group, Merav Eitan and Gaston Zahr, Israel –Tzahal Square: This colorful and amusing installation finds the humor in that annoying urban situation that we get stuck in every day: the traffic jam. We think of traffic lights, car lights and blinkers as things that are technical, practical and normal. But a change of perspective regarding these amazing light elements transforms our car and road lighting into an engaging work of art that we might remember with a smile the next time we find ourselves caught in a traffic jam.

Dandelions – on the Green Trail lawns: Giant Dandelions – 90 huge flowers of varying heights create a forest that visitors can enjoy. The dandelions are made up of 9,000 recycled water bottles, cut so they could be recast with nylon for artistic purposes. Each flower has a sustainable light source; by means of their creatively-recycled components, the dandelions create a landscape of light that shows us how inimical waste is to our survival.

Large Fire Tornado – Ivan Schoofs, Kinetic Humor, the Netherlands – Olive Tree lawn:Fire is the mother of light; nature in all its destructive beauty. Artist and technical engineer Ivo Schoofs saw what happened when a tornado raged across a forest fire to elevate the flames. He wondered if it was possible to reproduce that very same effect. After a successful scale-model of a fire tornado, Ivo Schoofs and his team have now successfully built a fascinating light installation which spectacularly exposes a piece of nature’s architecture. The Large Fire Tornado is created by a powerful fire source and 36 industrial fans inside a 12 meter high hexagonal scaffold. Viewers will see light in its most original form.

Stories of Damascus Gate,  Albert Yashinsky, Arik Futterman, Yavin BenReshef, GaroKabushaeo – Damascus Gate: The Tree of Life appears repeatedly in different faiths and cultures. The tree symbolizes longevity, wealth, honor, peace and an unblemished world – our highest aspirations as human beings. This work is replete with legends, stories from the Torah and from our own everyday lives – encompassing good and evil, sorrow and joy, and our longing for more perfect lives in the world in which we live. Through video and animation technology, and by means of projection mapping, the stories will come to life on Damascus Gate, and will prominently reflect the Gate’s surrounding environment.

Globoscope, Maxime Houot – Collectif Coin, France – Zedekiah’s Cave: A work made up of a large number of light fixtures arranged within a space, which produce an ever-changing, multisensory experience. The installation, which was displayed for the first time in 2014 at the Lyon, France Festival of Light, uses technical means to create a digitalized recreation of a space. Configured in harmony with the characteristics of the space, the individual “points” and “pixels” which make up the landscape are merged into one by the sound and light movements that swirl through. Mathematics, sound and light are in this way used to represent, transform, and expand a space, offering the viewer a surrealist stroll.

 

The Festival will be held from May 25-June 2 (17-25 Iyar)

Wednesday and Thursday, from 8 pm – 11 pm

(Saturday night to midnight – no Friday activity)

Apple Walnut Muffins

Below is the recipe which I found on the internet. The copy that I saved from the cereal box differs slightly: the box has 1 egg, 1/3 cup sugar, lacks the nutmeg, 1 teas cinnamon

Ingredients:(http://postfoods.com/recipes/apple-raisin-bran-muffins)

  • 1-1/2 cups flour ( I used half spelt half oat)

  • 1/4 cup sugar-I used 2 tablespoons coconut sugar

  • 1 tbsp. baking powder

  • 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon, I used 1 teas

  • 1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg, I used 1/2 teas

  • 1/4 tsp. salt-left out

  • 2 eggs-I used 1

  • 1 cup reduced fat milk, I used coconut milk

  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil

  • 1-1/2 cups Post Raisin Bran Cereal-I used muesli with fruit removed and placed into vanilla solution

  • 1 large apple, peeled, finely chopped (1 cup) omitted and raised the apple butter amount slightly

  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts

Directions

  1. Chop the nuts and remove from food processor.

  2. Mix flour, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg in large bowl.

  3. Place wheat sprouts in the food processor and chop for about 30 seconds. Swirl in eggs, milk, apple butter and oil into the mixture for 15 seconds, until well blended. Add in flour mixture; stir just until moistened. (Batter will be lumpy.) Stir in granola cereal,  and walnuts.

  4. Spoon batter (55 gr) into greased or paper-lined muffin pan, filling each cup 2/3 full. This made exactly 12 muffins. Top with dried fruit soaked in brandy/vanilla

  5. Bake at 425°F for 20 minutes or until toothpick inserted in centers comes out clean. I prefer to bake 10 minutes, take out and turn the muffins and bake another 10 minutes. Let stand 5 minutes. Serve warm.

 

 

Post 308: Almond cuisine, Alkaline diet, Paris on Jaffo, shopping the Machana Yehuda Shuk, meet the ripe almond seed, the seed of the almond fruit is what we refer to as the almond nut, alkaline foods

Israel is entering the blazing fruit season. I can only describe my early meet-up with Israeli fruit as a learning experience. All summer fruit, melons, peaches, nectarines etc., are sold very firm on the outside and tasty, luscious and cool on the inside.

Yes, I try to be in Jerusalem for the summer. This morning rain fell until 8:00 A.M. and the subsequent winds were pleasant and cooling under the day’s sun. Perfect. 

The outside of what was a very ripe luscious, cantaloupe, had lots of scars, rendering it very cheap. Pity, scars make customers run for the hills. When I opened it, the flesh was a perfect pink orange. Next, extracted the seeds, the juices that ran down my wrist, were cool. Amazing.  Can’t go wrong as the store owners constantly weed out the overripe  fruit. They also observe how quickly a customer moves around. And friendships develop. If you have been away for a while they will notice. Years back I was in a big rush and left a cabbage on the counter. Really there is no “real” counter. The produce is piled up in mounds and one pays by stretching out an arm until all of one’s items are weighed. I discovered the loss and debated whether or not to return. As it happens, a few days past.

When I presented my predicament to the stall owner, not only did he recall that I had left a cabbage, he knew the exact weight! He made an adjustment to my second cabbage.

The best place in the States for fruit shopping is a Korean, or any Asian, Jewish or Italian market. Sorry I’ll pass on Whole Foods or Trader Joes, where they price by the piece, or plastic wrap all the produce.

Yes, you never know in advance what will be on deck in the shuk. It’s like a blind date. Take a first impression, circle the prospects, smell  if they are past their prime, and mostly take some risks.

I almost passed up this almond (fresh picked) assortment. wp-1464204373880.jpegThen  I paused and watched a 35 ish black male customer take one of these almonds. He crushed it in his mouth, ate under the skin, and commented that they were past their prime and was about to spit out the nut.

In Iran, he said, everyone eats the outside and spits out the pit. Talk about a bad blind date! Remember first impressions.

The close-by Arab Israeli worker rose up in defense of the almond. “Why, (in Hebrew) the pit has the almond” he offered  incredulously. He offered me and the Jewish Iranian a few and yes, the raw almonds were fantastic.

There is a traditional Moroccan boiled almond dish. You can soak the almonds, then peel and fry them to decorate rice. That’s the best that I can find, except using the raw almonds as a cheese substitute.

(from Whole foods site). Although packaged almonds are available year round, they are the freshest in mid-summer, which is when they are at the height of their season. As you see in the photo, the almond that we think of as a nut is technically the seed of the fruit of the almond tree, a medium-size tree that bears fragrant pink and white flowers. Like its cousins, the peach, cherry and apricot trees, the almond tree bears fruits with stone-like seeds (or pits) within. The seed of the almond fruit is what we refer to as the almond nut. That first opportunity to have my  “almond” seed tasting, yes, I could nibble away at them

 

Almonds, sliced, raw
0.25 cup
(23.00 grams)

Calories: 132
GI: low

Nutrient DRI/DV

 biotin 49%

 vitamin E 40%

 manganese 27%

 copper 26%

 vitamin B2 18%

 phosphorus 16%

 magnesium 15%

 molybdenum 15%

 fiber 11%

This chart graphically details the %DV that a serving of Almonds provides for each of the nutrients of which it is a good, very good, or excellent source according to our Food Rating System.wp-1464204373880.jpeg

Now that the summer fruit harvest is in I am checking out Alkaline-forming foods • Lemon, lime and grapefruit • Dates, figs and apricots (rehydrated) • Tomato, apple, pear, mango, papaya and avocado • Watercress, fennel, asparagus, celery and cauliflower • Onion, garlic, ginger (fresh) and beetroot • Kelp, spinach, rocket, parsley and coriander • Sunflower, pumpkin and sesame seeds, and their oils • Almonds, walnuts and pecans • Quinoa, millet, buckwheat, oats and brown rice • Almond milk, brown-rice milk • Ground coconut and coconut water – Looks like a variety  for burger variations.

See more at: http://eluxemagazine.com/magazine/drop-the-acid-why-eating-alkaline-is-important/#sthash.JZjbMh1U.dpuf

wp-1464204677132.jpeg
Yes, that’s a mini Eiffel Tower on Yaffo.
wp-1464474380791.jpeg
I hope to visit the now running jerusalem Light Festival next week

Post 307: Paper Butterflies on Betzalel and Shatz Midrachove, Some activities for Design Week Jerusalem 2016 Pull-Apart Rugelach Adapted from The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook

wp-1464110859364.jpegFor For hose of you out there who are way past flicker, please bear with me on this learning curve. The photo taken above at night is my first spotting of paper butterflies, all shapes and sizes. The art students keep spreading them over trees and lamp-posts. This spread is over a bus stop. As I get better at using flicker, I’ll get the photos from my phone. The best that I can do for now is give you the link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/7552971@N05/shares/3L4rb6 showing 5 additional charming butterfly photos. We had a very windy day today and they are still attached! I expect that this flurry has to do with Jerusalem Design Week: Details Blow:

Main Exhibit

A large presentation of exhibits by local and international artists will be held at the Hansen House. The theme of the exhibit will focus on designers in the age of information and how it affects our daily lives.

Where: Hansen House, 14 Gedalyahu Alon, Jerusalem
When:
Thursday, May 19, 07:00 to 11:00 pm
Friday, May 20, 10:00 am to 04:00 pm
Saturday, May 21, 10:00 am to 10:00 pm
Sunday-Thursday, May 22-26, 12:00 am to 11:00 pm
Cost: free

Israeli Design at Villa Schruber :This event revolves around the best, young and local designers. Learn how their courage and the Israeli community affects their design and creations.

Where: Villa Schruber, 2 Pinsker St., Jerusalem
When:
Thursday, May 19, 07:00 to 11:00 pm
Friday, May 20, 10:00 am to 04:00 pm
Sunday-Thursday, May 22-26, 12:00 am to 11:00 pm
Cost: free

Design at the First Station

This exhibits is the story of a group of talented students that built a cause and effect machine that will showcase the importance of working together, no matter the race or nationality.

Where: The First Station, 4 David Remez St., Jerusalem
The machine will operate on the following schedule:
Thursday, May 19, 05:30 pm
Friday-Saturday, May 20-21, 10:00 am, 12:00 am, 02:00 pm
Sunday, May 22, 05:00 pm
Monday-Thursday, May 23-26, 11:00 am to 05:30 pm
Cost: free

You can also view the full schedule of the Design Week by visiting the Hansen House website (in Hebrew).

Details

When: May 19-26, 2016
Where: Hansen House, 14 Gedalyahu Alon, Jerusalem
More information: +972-625-7772, Hansen House Website (in Hebrew)

– See more at: http://www.itraveljerusalem.com/events/jerusalem-design-week/#sthash.bPF9Sg5r.dpuf.

Also part of the design week events:SHIDRUGATION

At the entrance to the Clal Building, on the Jaffa Street level, an activity compound will be built by artist Yaakov Sasson, where the Nahalata Group will run arts and crafts workshops.  During the week, objects in need of an artistic/ design update may be brought to the compound.

Friday, May 20th, 11:00-16:00 – Kick-off Carnival

Activity Hours:  Sunday to Thursday – 12:00 to 20:00

The workshops will begin at 15:00:  Amazing design workshops, purse making, clothing upgrade, etc.

Daily tours will leave from the compound at 16:30.

 

 THE GIVAT RAM COMPOUND 

The Bloomfield Science Museum

The museum will offer a workshop on building with assorted materials, and as part of the Design Week, the workshop will host design students and architects who will design and build models onsite.  The public is invited to take part in the building experience.  During the Design Week, there will be an ‘Under Construction’ Event – featuring a variety of workshops, demos and a huge fair with building games for the entire family.

Among the various activities:  An amazing building games fair, an exhibition of ‘Why Buildings Don’t Fall” – Aggregate Construction, etc.

Activity Hours:

Monday to Thursday          10:00 – 18:00

Friday                                    10:00 – 14:00

Saturday                                10:00 – 16:00

Amit Zoran’s Laboratory

Amit Zoran will open his innovation lab to the public, especially for Design Week, offering a glimpse into selected experiments and products that combine the world of digital production and mathematical models with culinary art and handicrafts.

Activity Hours

Monday to Wednesday       17:00 – 19:00

At 17:15 and 18:15, there will be a presentation at the Computer Science Building at the university.

There is palpable current, a pulse that pervades the butterfly area and even the bare walls across from our apartment has exhibits: I responded to the sign on the space, taken by the School of Visual Theater. Yes, it’s like a land grab!

Hi,
I saw that students from the School of Visual Theater were covering the space on 2 places opposite 9 Shmuel Ha Nagid. That’s where I live. We chatted a bit about the source of their components, which I commented were reclaimed from the garbage. Then we had a laugh together. Perfectly the best source of materials.
I am an artist. I have a lot of ceramic and glass tile. I would like to collaborate with you on a project for the 2 places that is permanent. Also the surface holes need to be filled.
Kol tuv
Ida 052 522 7635. I received a reply both from the Visual Arts Public Relations staff member, Renat, and Huddie, the fellow I met during the winter. They don’t want to fix or make any changes in the cracks, just want to put up drawings. OK by me.

img_20160522_110735.jpg

http://lifeinisrael.blogspot.co.uk/2014/09/hitchaivut-authorization-from-macabee.html

For much of this past week I have been consumed with un-food, un-work, un-fun. There were great positives too, Torah inspiration, dedication. Yes, you guessed it, seeing doctors, lots, sharing time with the shining medical staff of the Cardiac unit floor eight Hadassah Hospital Ein Kerem. Not that they were unpleasant. They were informed and helpful. But for a homebody like me, seven days of being subject to the waiting that treatment at any hospital entails, was debilitating. And I wasn’t the patient. Just imagining what the patient was going through! Dai (enough in Hebrew).

Admission to a hospital here in Israel, through everyday channels, requires a Hitchaivut, assumption of responsibility to pay for your stay by your HMO. If you would like to learn more about the admission process, I suggest http://lifeinisrael.blogspot.co.uk/2014/09/hitchaivut-authorization-from-macabee.html

Every patient has a different experience.

On Friday took a stroll around the corner to the weekly outdoor Artist’s Fair on Betzalel. Not close to the numbers exhibiting at the Washington Square Art Shoe (remember those?). There are about 50-60 vendors including designers working.wp-1464198937488.jpeg

The designers set up an out-door studio. The project was a tent made from recycled fabric. People brought their unwanted clothing. One table was designated to cut out gold circles and another designer ironed them on a square on a rectangle of fabric. A third designer joined the pieces at a sewing machine powered by electricity from a nearby restaurant.

Recycling, is promoted mainly for water use as. I am not sure, but I think that less clothing is thrown in the garbage here than in the States. Let’s say, people can opt to pay almost nothing for clothing.We have gemachim, small centers in a house or basement, where second hand clothes are distributed, much coming from abroad.

Lastly, if all this walking and watching has gotten you hungry, check out a description of superfoods, followed by a comforting pastry for Shavuot. Lastly is a description of the daikon  pickle, and an invitation to a Lag B’Omer Barbeque. Sorry past already.

Super-foods:https://alanfitness.wordpress.com/

Super-food powders, such as maca, baobab and moringa, and spices such as cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg, blend in easily to any batter, adding both flavor and antioxidants.  And they also say there is good news for the chocoholics out there—the darker the chocolate, the less sugar and more flavanols it has. Dark chocolate (at least 70%), cacao (raw, unprocessed cocoa powder) and cacao nibs can be added to a brownie or mousse recipe for layers of chocolate flavor and texture. The flavanols in chocolate are antioxidants that act to lower inflammation and boost immunity.

Pull-Apart Rugelach
Adapted from The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook

Rugelach fillings are as flexible and creative as you are. Here, we use some jam, cinnamon-sugar, and a mix of chopped nuts, dried fruit and chocolate as the “coarse” mix but you can swap this with 1 cup of whatever you’d prefer. I use an egg wash for shine on top, but if eggs are an issue for you, brushing some cream over the top works too. In regards to the dough, I just want to underline that unlike pie crusts, puffed pastry or croissants, the flakiness here is not something it takes magic and/or advanced skill to create; you don’t need to cut cold butter into flour, envelope, roll, or anything else. No matter how you blend it, the results will be incomparably flaky.

Makes 40 to 48 rugelach

Dough
2 cups (260 grams) all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon fine sea or table salt
1/2 pound (225 grams) unsalted butter
1/2 pound (1 8-ounce or 225-gram package) cream cheese

Filling
2/3 cup (135 grams) granulated sugar
1 1/2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
1/3 cup miniature chocolate chips or finely chopped bitter- or semi-sweet chocolate
1/3 cup toasted nuts, chopped small (I used walnuts)
1/3 cup dried fruit, chopped small; (I used tiny dried currants, no chopping needed)
1/2 to 3/4 cup jam (I used seedless raspberry, apricot is more traditional)

Finish
1 egg beaten with 1 teaspoon water or milk
Remaining cinnamon-sugar from above

Make the dough:

In a food processor: Place flour and salt in work bowl fitted with standard blade. Pulse to combine. Add cream cheese, chopped into large chunks, and run machine until it’s fully dispersed into the flour. Add butter in large chunks and run machine until dough starts to clump. Dump out onto a large piece of plastic wrap and form into a flattish disc.

With a mixer: Let butter and cream cheese soften at room temperature. Beat both together until light and fluffy. Beat in salt. Add flour, beating until it disappears. Scrape dough onto a large piece of plastic wrap and form into a flattish disc.

Both methods: Chill dough until totally firm — about 2 hours in the fridge you can hasten this along in the freezer for about 30 minutes. (Dough keeps in fridge for up to a week, and in freezer much longer.)

Form the pastries:

Heat oven to 350 degrees F and line a couple baking sheets with parchment paper or nonstick baking mats.

Stir cinnamon and sugar together in a small dish. Combine coarse mixture of chocolate, nuts and dried fruit in a second dish.

Divide dough into quarters and roll first quarter out on a floured counter into a rectangle about 12 inches wide and 7 to 8 inches long, with the wider side to you. Thinly spread dough to all but the furthest 1/4 inch from you — which seals better once rolled if bare — with about 2 to 3 tablespoons jam. (I find that with seedless raspberry, 2T covers nicely but with thicker jam, you’ll need 3T to coat it thinly. If your jam is difficult to spread, you can warm it gently in the microwave for a few seconds first.) Sprinkle with 2 tablespoons cinnamon-sugar mixture, then 4 tablespoons coarse fruit and nut mixture.

Roll dough from the 12-inch side in front of you into as tight as a log as you can, using your fingers to lightly seal the ends onto the log. Repeat with remaining logs.

Now, choose your final shape:

To make classic, easy sliced cookies: Place log of filled dough in freezer for 10 to 15 minutes; it will cut more cleanly once semi-firm. Trim ends from log so they have a clean shape. Cut log into 10 to 12 even slices. Arrange on prepared baking sheets a couple inches apart from each other.

To make a ring of spirals: Place log of filled dough in freezer for 10 to 15 minutes; it will cut more cleanly once semi-firm. Trim ends from log so they have a clean shape. Cut log into 10 to 12 even slices. Arrange them in a ring formation on prepared baking sheets so that each link touches. Do note: This will be the hardest to lift in one piece from the baking sheet once cool.

To make a pull-apart wreath: Form log into a ring, connecting the ends and smoothing the dough to seal the shape. Place ring in freezer for 10 to 15 minutes; it will cut more cleanly once semi-firm. On prepared baking sheet, cut 10 to 12 evenly spaced apart notches in ring, cutting through all but the last 1/4-inch of log so it stays connected.

To make a pull-apart log: Place log of filled dough in freezer for 10 to 15 minutes; it will cut more cleanly once semi-firm. Trim ends from log so they have a clean shape. On prepared baking sheet, cut 10 to 12 evenly spaced apart notches in log, alternating sides that you cut from, cutting through all but the last 1/4-inch of log so it stays connected.

To make a split log twisted together like a babka: Don’t. It was a flopped-open mess. We couldn’t even eat it. [biggest lie, ever]

For all shapes: Brush top(s) lightly with egg wash and sprinkle with a total of 1 teaspoon of the remaining cinnamon-sugar mixture. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until golden brown on top. Individual cookies need to cool only a few minutes on baking sheet before they can be transferred to a cooling rack but larger rings, wreaths and logs do best if they cool at least 3/4 of the way to solidify more before attempting to carefully transfer them.

Cooled cookies keep in a container at room temperature for a week, and in the freezer for a month. Just not around here.

More do-ahead tips: Your filled log of rugelach is also easy to freeze until needed (I did this with the two I had left). Wrap well, and you can slice it into cookies straight from the freezer, baking them while still frozen — you’ll just new a few extra minutes in the oven.

TAKUAN

20140520-tsukemono-takuan.jpg

Takuan is a crunchy daikon pickle named for the Zen monk credited with its invention. It’s distinguished by its bright yellow color, which can be achieved through the cultivation of bacillus subtilis bacteria during fermentation, heightened by the addition of persimmon peels, nasturtium flowers, or other coloring agents.

How it’s made: Daikon is sun-dried and salted before being placed in a container with nukadoko, a rice bran-based fermenting medium rich inbacillus subtilis. It’s then left to sit for anywhere from a few weeks to a few months.

How it tastes: Mildly tart and citrusy with a slight funk.

Serve it with: Plain rice, in bento boxes, and in maki rolls, either on its own or with fatty tuna. It’s also popular in Korea (where it’s known as danmuji), appearing inside kimbap rolls or with jjajangmyun (black bean noodles).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post 306: Invitation to spend an evening with Natalie Knight, Founder of the Natalie Knight Gallery, Hyde Park, Johannesburg, A joke about a freezing bird, Yard Sale at AACI, Free attractions in Israel Lag B’Omer

Hi very dear readers,

There are many events below, some into June. If you are most interested in the joke,please scroll down.

Your Personal Invitation

Wits Alumni Reunion: Israel

 The Wits Israel Chapter and World Mizrachi, Telfed are proud to present an evening with Natalie Knight.

natalie knight
    

The Wits Israel Chapter and World Mizrachi, Telfed are proud to present an evening with Natalie Knight.

Wits alumna, Founder of the Natalie Knight Gallery, Hyde Park, Johannesburg, Most Influential Women in Business and Government Awards 2014 (in the Arts and Culture Sector), active member of Mizrachi Shul, Glenhazel, Johannesburg.

There will be a power point presentation on the topic:
The artistic fruits of the long walk to freedom.

Knight examines how Mandela’s legacy is portrayed by the artists, questioning how much of the euphoria of 1994 remains, and what artistic fruit the achievements of Madiba have borne.

Date
Monday 23 May at 8:00pm

Venue
World Mizrachi Center – Beit Meir, 54 King George Street, Jerusalem

There will be NO entry charge

RSVP
Dana Ben Chail (Telfed) Tel 09 7907805
volunteers@telfed.org.il   |   lesglassman@gmail.com

Event is sponsored by Stephan Welz & Company Ltd

Free Museum Day – May 26/Lag Ba’Omer

Lag Ba’Omer, May 26, 2016, is International Museum Day in Israel, and there are over 60 museums around Israel open to the public for free!

Many museums on this list are usually quite pricey for a family to visit, but I will warn you now – get there early or risk having the doors closed due to overcrowding!

*I have tried to list phone numbers and opening hours as accurately as possible. However, I cannot take responsibility for any errors, so please call the museums you plan to visit to verify this information before you go.

I have tried, wherever possible, to link to websites in English. There were some museums/historical sites that only had Hebrew websites, though. My apologies in advance.

The list below represents many hours of work translating and researching, and I request that if you want to share this information, you link to this blog post. Thank you for your cooperation and understanding.

Here’s the list (the full list in Hebrew is available here)

North

The Kupferman Collection, Lochamei HaGeta’ot, open 10am- 3pm 054-4993851

Ein-Dor Museum of Archaeology, Kibbutz Ein-Dor, open 9am -3pm 04-6770333

The National Maritime Museum. open 10am – 4pm 04-8536622

The Open Museum in Tefen open 10am – 3pm 04-9109609

Memorial Museum of Hungarian Speaking Jewry, Tsfat, open 9am -2pm 04-6925881

MadaTech in Haifa, open 10am – 5pm 04-8614444
The Underground Prisoners’ Museum, Acco, open 8am – 4pm 04-6941565
HaShomer House Museum – Kfar Giladi 04-6941565  open 8am – 4pm
The Chaim Shturman House – at Kibbutz Ein Harud.open 9am – 4pm  04-6486337 | 04-6486328
Bar David Museum for Jewish Art and Judaica – Kibbutz Baram, 04-6988295 open 10am – 4pm
The Goara Museum of the Hagana. 04-9597402 open 8am – 4pm
The Hecht Museum, University of Haifa, 04-8240308   open 10am – 4pm
The Museum of the First Aliyah in Zichron, 04-6294777 open 9am – 4pm
The Haifa City Museum. 04-9115888 open 10am – 4pm
The Herman Struk Museum 04-6359962   open 10am – 9pm

Wilfrid Israel Museum, Kibbutz HaZorea, 04-9899566 open 9am – 2pmThe Haifa Museum of Art 04-9115997 open 10am – 9pm

The Tikotin Museum of Japanese Art  04-8383554  open 10am – 4pm
The Janco-Dada Museum, Ein Hod 04-9842350 open 10am – 3pm
Mane Katz Museum, Haifa 04-9119372 open 10am – 4pm
Museum of Art, Ein Hod 04-6486038  open 9am – 4:30pm
Center
Beit Miriam  Kibbutz Palmachim, 03-9538281 open 9am – 2pm
Clore Garden of Science, Rechovot   08-9378300  open 9am – 5pm
The Israeli Cartoon Museum, Holon 03-6521849 open 5pm – 8pm
 
The Museum of Israeli Art, Ramat Gan 03-7521876/7 open 10am – 8pm
The Israel Puppet Center, Holon 03-6516848 open 10am – 6pm
Eretz Israel Museum, Tel Aviv 03-6415244 open 10am – 8pm
HaGedudim Museum, Moshav Avichail 09-8822212 open 8:30am – 4pm
The Rubin Museum, Tel Aviv  03-5255961  open 10am – 3pm
Toldot Tzahal Museum, Tel Aviv 03-5172913 open 8am – 4pm
Man and the Living World Museum, Ramat Gan 03-6315010 open 9am – 5pm
Museum of People and the Environment, Petach Tikvah 03-9286900/1 open 9am – 2pm
Etzel Museum, Tel Aviv 03-5284001 open 8am – 4pm
The Etzel 1948 Museum , Tel Aviv 03-5177180 , 03-5172044 open 8am – 4pm
The Hagana Museum – 03-5608624 open 8am – 4pm
The Khan Museum, Hadera. 04-6322330 , 04-6324562 open 8am – 2pm
The Oppenheimer Diamond Museum  Ramat Gan, 03-5760219   open 10am – 6:30pm
The Eran Shamir Village Museum Mazkeret Batya  08-9349525 open 8am – 2pm
The Jabotinsky Museum  03-5287320 open 8am – 4pm
The Hosmasa Museum – Holon –  03-5050425  open 8:30am – 1pm

Kfar Saba Archaeology Museum, Kfar Saba 09-7640867/8 open 8am – 7pmThe Lechi Museum    03-6820288  open 8am – 4pm

The Netanya City Historical Museum, 09-8840020   open 10am – 4pm

Massuah Institute for Holocaust Studies, Kibbutz Tel Yitzchak 09-7497200 open 8am – 3pm

Nahum Gutman Museum of Art, Tel Aviv  03-5161970 open 10am – 4pm

The Petach Tikvah Museum of Art 03-9286300  open 4pm – 8pm

The Rishon L’Tzion Museum  03-9598862,  03-9598890  open 9am – 2pm

The Ramla Museum, Ramla 08-9292650    open 9am – 4pm

Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv   03-6077020 open 4pm – 9pm

Jerusalem Area

The Museum for Islamic Art in Jerusalem   02-5661291/2  open 10am – 8:30pm

The Underground Prisoners Museum in Jerusalem   02-6233166 ‘ open 9am – 5pm

The Bible Lands Museum, Jerusalem 02-5611066   open 9:30am – 5:30pm

The Nature Museum, Jerusalem 02-5631116 open 9am – 2pm

Hechal Shlomo, Jerusalem 02-5889010 open 9am – 3pm

Bloomfield Science Museum, Jerusalem 02-6544888 open 10am – 6pm

The Old Yishuv Court Museum, 02-6276319, 052-4002478  open 10am – 5pm

The Israel Museum  02-6708811 open 10am – 5pm

Tower of David Museum  02-6265333 open 9am – 4pm

SOUTH 

The Open Museum, Omer  08-9908120/1 open 9am – 4pm

The Museum of Philistine Culture 08-6224799 open 9am – 4pm

The Negev Museum of Art, Beer Sheva   08-6993531  open 10am – 4pm

The Museum of Islamic and Near Eastern Culture 08-6993535 open 10am – 4pm

source: With modification:

http://www.jokes4us.com/animaljokes/managementlessonjoke.htmlAs the frozen bird lay there 

Friday, June 3rd, 8:30 am – 12:30 pm

 

A bargain-hunter’s heaven, the AACI Yard Sale – Toys, games, clothing, kitchen and household wares, books and much more.

The early bird will catch all the bargains that vendors have to offer, plus food vendors.

Come One Come All !

 

Post 305: Attending a party in Betar Elit, comparisons with neighboring Husan, and recommendation to visit the exhibit The Place at the Brooklyn Museum, Reflections on Israel’s 68th Birthday Rav Eliyahu of Vilna lived in the 18th C the Gra, as he is known urged his students to immigrate to Israel and settle there.

Husan and Betar Elit a kilometer apart.

In 1978, Husan had a total land area of 7,134 dunams. Since the establishment of Betar Illit which took up 4,299.38026 dunams and land expropriations by the Israeli Defense Forces, the town has been downsized to 1,425 dunams. 

Population of the two areas according to the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics (PCBS):

The total population of Husan in 2007 was 5,551; of which 2,942 are males and 2,609 are females. There are 1,028 households living in 1,195 housing units.

Beitar Illit on the other hand is one of Israel‘s largest and most rapidly growing cities and in 2014 had a population of 46,874.

There is no wall separating the two communities, and I hope that there will not be any. However, visibly, the two areas each are their own enclave.

 

I have some problems separating Israel and the disputed areas . As of July 2015  this disputed area had a estimated population of 2,785,366 Palestinians, and approximately 371,000 ISRAELIS  and approximately another 212,000 Jewish Israelis in East Jerusalem. It’s kind of amusing, because if one asked any of the residents of these areas of Jerusalem if the lived in a “disputed” area, they would not know what you were talking about.

East Talpiot תלפיות
French Hill הגבעה הצרפתית
Gilo גילֹה
Giv’at Hamivtar גבעת המבתר
Har Homa, Givat Hamatos הר חומה
Ma’alot Dafna מעלות דפנה
Neve Yaakov נווה יעקב
Pisgat Ze’ev פסגת זאב
Ramat Eshkol רמת אשכול
Ramat Shlomo רמת שלמה
Ramot רמות אלון
Sanhedria Murhevet
Settlement Population City status granted
Ariel
אריאל
18,638 (2012[1]) 1998
Beitar Illit
ביתר עילית
45,710 (2013[2]) n/a
Ma’ale Adumim
מעלה אדומים
39,200 (2013) 1991
Modi’in Illit
מודיעין עילית
59,332 (2012) 2008

Lastly, an Exhibit that I would visit if I were in New York City and some reflections on Israel’s 68th Birthday.

Rav Eliyahu of Vilna lived in the 18th Century the Gra, as he is known, urged his students to immigrate to Israel and settle there.

This Place FEBRUARY 12–JUNE 5, 2016

“Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing, 4th Fl. This Place explores the complexity of Israel and the West Bank, as place and metaphor, through the eyes of twelve internationally acclaimed photographers. “

Featuring more than 600 photographs by Frédéric Brenner, Wendy Ewald, Martin Kollar, Josef Koudelka, Jungjin Lee, Gilles Peress, Fazal Sheikh, Stephen Shore, Rosalind Fox Solomon, Thomas Struth, Jeff Wall, and Nick Waplington, This Place offers  an intricate and fragmented portrait, alive to all the rifts and paradoxes of this important and much contested place.

I wonder if there is a single photo of the residents of Betar.

Between 2009 and 2012, the twelve artists spent extended periods in Israel and the West Bank, free to approach their subjects as they chose. They travelled throughout the region and engaged with a remarkable variety of individuals and communities. While the exhibition presents twelve distinct perspectives, several key themes emerged, such as family, identity, home, and landscape and the environment.

‬‏דווח על תמונות
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪frederic brenner portrait three generations of israeli family‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪frederic brenner portrait three generations of israeli family‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪frederic brenner portrait three generations of israeli family‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪frederic brenner portrait three generations of israeli family‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪frederic brenner portrait three generations of israeli family‬‏

Only a fraction of the 50,000 to 100,00 photographs that they took are exhibited here; an entire room is devoted to them and they are arranged on rows of shelves by group, including Israeli girls in a pre-army mehina, or preparatory program, kids in a joint Arab-Jewish school, Druze students, grandmothers from East Jerusalem and Gypsies.
Read more at http://www.thejewishweek.com/arts/photography/sense-place-sense-complexity#PqA4lotuEz1if7f0.99

Hi All,

This past week, Israel celebrated its 68th birthday and it is worth taking a step back to reflect and appreciate the magnitude of this blessing, not only for those of us who live here, but for Jews worldwide. In this spirit, I came across
a remarkable and quite astounding statement by the Gaon of Vilna, one which is both unsettling and challenging. This is not my usual
chizuk insight and I present it for your consideration.

Rav Eliyahu of Vilna lived in the 18th C. and was one of our greatest spiritual geniuses and righteous luminaries. He had not only mastered the entire rabbinic literature at a young age, but was equally knowledgeable in all our esoteric kabbalistic doctrines. His teachings have come down to us from his many students and, to this day, exert a powerful influence not only upon halachic practice but upon our entire theology as well.

In 1781, the Gra, as he is known, urged his students to immigrate to Israel and settle there. In
Kol HaTor, the record of the Gra’s views about how the End of Days will play out, his nephew and student writes how the Gaon would emotionally plead with his students not to delay their departure as only in Israel would there be a safe haven (5:1,2). Was the Gra almost prescient about a great tragedy about to decimate Diaspora Jewry? We do not know, but in any event, the Gaon was persuaded, based upon his understanding of our deeper literature that the time had come for the ingathering of the exiles. He was convinced, in stark contrast to many of his rabbinic contemporaries, that the final redemption required bold initiative on the part of the Jewish people. Gd would only act once man first contributed to that redemption. And to the Gra, this contribution was to begin with the settling of the Land. His students complied. They were the proto-religious Zionists, some 100 years before that denomination was ever coined.

Even more striking was the Gra’s kabbalistic analysis of the
Sefirah period. In particular, he took note of two dates in the 49 day count between
Pesach and Shavuos which were specifically endowed with a unique Divine effluence of mercy and great spiritual moment. Those days – and please remember, this was in the 18 C. – he identified as the 20th and 42nd days of the
Omer count. The 20th day of the Omer is the 5th of Iyar –
Yom Ha’atzmaut, and the 42nd day of the Omer is the 27th of Iyar, the first of two days of battle which, in 1967, resulted in the reunification of Jerusalem, celebrated on the second of those days,
Yom Yerushalayim. In fact, it was in 1822, intentionally on the 5th of Iyar that the students of the Gra began building their synagogue in Jerusalem.

Was the Gra clairvoyant about how history would unfold 150 years after his death? Do his religious insights – the
truths he felt he discovered – grant greater significance to the religious Zionist enterprise? Do these two dates take on a measure of deep spiritual meaning in addition to their historical momentousness? And if so, are we not impelled to ask ourselves
whether, like the students of the Gaon, we ought to seriously consider
aliyah?

I leave the questions open, but, on this Yom Ha’atzmaut, we at least owe it to ourselves to think about them and …, ask ourselves whether the time has come for us to give our own
aliyah serious consideration.

Article above By Jeff Bienenfeld

P.S. Incidentally, in case you haven’t seen it, I would strongly recommend reading this essay by Dov Lipman about Israel.

http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Happy-In-Israel-453264?utm_campaign=shareaholic&utm_medium=email_this&utm_source=email

 

Post 304: Festive Israeli Dance Evening at the beautiful gym on Rechov Yehudah 29. Free Admission to Israel Museum, Yom Haatzmaut celebration with music, dance and more. Three generations of Hora troupes perform traditional Israeli dances in a variety of colorful costumes at the Shrine of the Book plaza and Sorrel Soup

 

Ladies, come celebrate Yom Ha’atzmeut in true Israeli style!!!

Festive Israeli Dance Evening at the beautiful gym on Rechov Yehudah 29.

Wednesday, May 11th, beginning at 11:00 p.m. until the wee hours.

Old and new dances in the spirit of Eretz Yisrael Hayaffa.

***FREE ADMISSION *** Light Refreshments***7 Dance Leaders***All Women and Girls Welcome***

__._,_.___

Old-fashioned Independence Day Celebration at the Israel Museum

May 12 @ 10:00 am9:00 pm

Israel Museum

A special Yom Haatzmaut  (Thursday May 12th) celebration with  music, dance and more. Three generations of Hora troupes perform traditional Israeli dances in a variety of colorful costumes at the Shrine of the Book plaza.  Communal folk dancing for the public with Mimi Kogan; Israeli music favorites with the HaDvorim band; costumed characters from the Museum’s leading exhibitions greet visitors around the Museum and invite them to join them in the galleries.

11 am – 2 pm: Dancing -dance and music performance – Museum entrance and all activities are free

Event Time

May 12 @ 10:00 am9:00 pm

celebrations around the country

Afula

  • Pablo Rozenberg
  • Dud Aharon

Arad

  • Mickey Gavrielov
  • White Noise
  • Kobi Peretz (on Thursday)

Ariel

  • Mosh Ben Ari
  • Yoav Yitzhak

Ashdod

  • Nadav Gadg
  • Peer Tassi
  • Mashina

Ashkelon

  • Avraham Tal
  • Sarit Chadad
  • Skuzzy

Be’er Sheva

  • Dudu Tassa
  • Balkan Beat Box
  • Barry Sacharov
  • Hadag Hanachash
  • Skuzzy
  • Kafe Shachor Chazak
  • Pinky

Bet Shemesh

Eilat

  • On the Promenade near the Mall
  • Near the Bridge – a stage for local groups
  • Folk dancing near the Bridge

Givatayim

  • Avraham Tal
  • Avihu Shabbat
  • Knisiyat HaSechel
Haifa

  • Barry Sacharov
  • Aviv Geffen
  • Eli Botner with Yaldei HaChutz
  • Jane Bordeux
  • Lucille Karo
  • The Angels
  • Mercedes Bend
  • Omer Adam


Herzliyah

  • Shlomo Shabat
  • Miri Masika
  • Ron Shuval
Hod Hasharon
Holon

  • Yehudit Ravitz
  • Kafe Shachor Chazak
  • Idan Yaniv
  • Yardena Arazi
Jerusalem

Mount Herzl – Official Celebration – (By invitation only)

19:45 – Yizkor, Speaker of the Knesset, Candle lighting ceremony, Flag raising ceremony, Various dance troupes and IDF Choirs, Fireworks display. The ceremony will be televised on local TV channels.

Kotel HaMaravi (Western Wall)

  • 8:00pm Prayers and partying

Numerous street parties and happenings all around Jerusalem with:

  • Natz Natz
  • Liron Amram
  • Binat El Funk
  • Lazer Lloyd
  • Einat Saruf
  • Chanan Ben Ari
  • Maor Edri
Karmiel – Kikar HaIriya
Kfar Saba

  • Karolina
  • Shiri Maimon & Shimon Buskila
  • Rotem Cohen
  • Static
  • Ben-El Tavori
Kfar Shmariyahu
Kiryat Bialik

  • Tuna
  • Ethnix
  • Shlomi Shabbat
Kiryat Ono

  • Dani Sanderson
Ma’ale Adumim
Modiin

  • Mashina
  • Chanan Ben Ari
  • Maor Edri
Netanya

  • Rotem Cohen
  • Liran Danino
  • Eliad Nachum
  • Simon Buskila
  • Shiri Maimon
  • Hatish Hagadol
  • Yuval Hamebulbal
Petach Tikva

  • Ronni Dalumi
  • Lior Narkis
  • Guy Yehud
  • Mosh Ben Ari
Raanana

  • Eden Ben Zaken
  • Muki
  • Miri Masika
Ramleh

  • Kobi Peretz
  • Adir Getz
  • Shlomi Saranga
Rehovot
Rishon LeZion

Performing at the various stages in Rishon LeZion will be:

  • Ben-El Tavori
  • Mosh Ben Ari
  • Skuzzy
  • Mercedes Bend
Ramat Gan

Performing at the various stages in Ramat Gan are:

  • Ivri Lieder
  • Dana Berger
  • Efrat Gosh
  • Jeremy Kaplan
  • Kafe Shachor Chazak
  • Itzik Keleh
  • Asaf Amdurski
  • Tviak Pik
  • Harel Skat
  • Dana International
Ramat Hasharon

  • Tzvika Pik
  • Hadag Hanachash
  • Yehudit Ravitz
  • Jane Bordo
  • Full Trunk
  • Ariel Zilber
  • Red Band
Shoham

  • Yehoram Gaon
  • Natz Natz
Tel Aviv

  • Adir Getz
  • David Broza
  • Stallos and Oren Chen
  • Deklan and Sagiv Cohen
  • Moshik Afiya
Tivon
Tzfat
Yavne
 And here is more fun stuff to do for Yom Ha’Atzmaut on Thursday  12th

Cultural Activities

The Ministry of Culture & Sport as well as The Society for the Preservation of Heritage sites are sponsoring entrance to a selection of museums, heritage sites and visitor centers across Israel

Please call before you go – book, verify opening hours, guided tours and other details

Southern Israel

  • Yad LaIsha HaLochemet in Nitzanim – Tel: 08-6727895
  • The Open Museum in Negba  – Tel:  050-55605540
  • From Holocaust to Revival Museum in Yad Mordechai  – Tel: 08-6720599 , 052-3923104
  • The Water and Security Museum in Nir Am  – Tel: 050-5709042
  • Mitzpe Gvulot – Kibbutz Gvulot  – Tel: 054-7919000
  • Ben Gurion’s Desert Home (Sde Boker) – Tel: 08-6560469
  • Maoz across from Gaza in Kibbutz Saad – Tel:052-3726644
  • The Joe Alon Center for Bedouin Culture at Kibbutz Lahav  – Tel: 08-9913322
  • The Revivim Museum named for Yosef Weitz – Tel:  08-6562570 \ 08-656263
  • Metzudat Yoav, The Givati Museum – Tel:  08-6611316
  • B’erot BaNegev Visitors’ Center – Kibbutz Alumim – Tel: 08-9937300

Jerusalem Area

  • The Old Yishuv Court Museum – Tel: 02-6276319, 052-4002478
  • Ammunition Hill Memorial Site – Tel: 02-5829392/3
  • The Yellin House – in Motza – Tel: 052-4257345
  • The Gush Etzion Visitors’ Center – Tel: 02-9935160
  • The Tower of David Museum – Tel: 02-626533
  • The Underground Prisoners Museum in Jerusalem – Tel: 02-6233166
  • The Shai Agnon House – Tel: 02-6716498
  • The Bank of Israel Visitor’s Center – advance booking required – Tel: 02-6552828,0 2-6552520, 02-6552718
  • Alone on the Walls of Jerusalem – Tel: 02-6265906
  • Menachem Begin Heritage Center –  Tel: 02-5652020 02-5652011
  • Yad LaShiryon at Latrun – Tel: 08-9784321
Tel Aviv and the Center

  • Independence Hall – Tel: 03-5106426,  03-5173942
  • The Israeli Museum at the Rabin Center – advance booking required – Tel:.*4585
  • Ben-Gurion House – 03-5221010
  • The Jabotinsky Museum – Tel: 03-5287320
  • The Joseph Bau House – Tel: 054-4301499
  • Rokach House – for more info: – Tel: 03-5168042
  • IDF Historical Collection Museum – Tel: 03-5172913 , 03-5161346
  • The Etzel Museum – Tel: 03-525-3307
  • The Hagana Museum –  Tel: 03-560862
  • The Lechi Museum – Tel: 03-6820288
  • The Etzel 1948 Museum – Tel: 03-5177180 , 03-5172044
  • The Nachum Gutman Museum of Art – Tel: 03-5161970
  • The Hosmasa Museum – Holon – Tel: 03-5050425
  • The Mikveh Israel Visitors Center – advance booking required – Tel:  03-5030489
  • The Rishon L’Tzion Museum – Tel: 03-9598862,  03-9598890
  • The Eran Shamir Moshava Museum in Mazkeret Batya – Tel:08-9349525
  • Ayalon Institute, Rehovot Tel: 08-9406552
  • Weizmann House, Rehovot – Tel: 08-9343230
Northern Israel

  • The Sliqim at Kfar Giladi – Tel:  052-2512915
  • HaShomer House Museum – Tel:  04-6941565
  • Tel Hai Courtyard – Tel: 04-6951333
  • The Birya Fortress – Tel:  04-6922433
  • The Restored Pioneer Village at Rosh Pinah – Tel:  04-6936913
  • The Kinneret Courtyard – Tel:  04-6709117
  • Naharayim Experience in Gesher – Tel:  04-6752685
  • The Palmach Cave – Tel: 04-9898946 ,052-4471109
  • The Historic Nahalal Police Station – Tel:  04-6415073
  • The Nahalal “Sliq” – Tel: 052-3347194
  • The Pioneer Settlers Museum – Kibbutz Yifat Tel:  04-6548974
  • HaReut Museum – Tel:   04-6432810
  • The Chaim Shturman House – at Kibbutz Ein Harud – Tel: 04-6486337 |  04-6486328
  • Beit HaMeiri, Tsfat – Tel:  04-6921939
  • The Tower and Stockade Museum at Hanita – Tel: 04-9859677
  • The Jezreel Valley Train Museum – Kfar Yehoshua – Tel:  04-9534226
  • Clandestine Immigration Boat Tour, Atlit – Tel:  04-9841980
  • The Goara Museum of the Hagana – Tel:  04-9597402
  • The Treasures in the Walls Museum, Akko. – Tel:  04-9911004
  • The Underground Prisoners Museum, Akko – Tel: 04-9911375
  • The Fisher House, Kiryat Ata – Tel:  04-8440207
  • The Museum of the First Aliyah in Zichron – Tel:  04-6294777
  • The Hannah Senesh House, Kibbutz Sdot Yam – Tel:  04-6364366   052-8795366
  • The Gdudim House Museum – Tel: 09-8822212
  • The Khan Museum, Hadera – Tel: 04-6322330 , 04-6324562
  • The Haifa City Museum – Tel: 04-9115888  
  • The Herman Struk Museum – Tel: 04-6359962 
  • The National Maritime Museum – Tel: 04-853662 

Also

  • The Israel Museum
  • The Open Museum in Omer
  • The Open Museum in Tefen
  • The Open Museum in Tel-Hai
  • Ramat HaNadiv in Zichron Yaakov

Israel Defense Force – IDF

Every year the Israel Defense Force allows members of the public access to some of the army, navy or air-force bases.  The bases listed below will be open on Thursday from 9 am – 2 pm

Navy Base

  • Ashdod – together with the Ashdod Port

Army Bases

Northern Command

  • Beit Hillel, Elika and Maalot

Central Command

  • Hativa Merhavit – Shomrom & in the Beka
  • Kiryat Arba, ‘Um Tzefa’, Karmi Tzur, Alfei Menashe, Givat Hatachmoshet (Jerusalem), Ariel & Shaked

Southern Command

  • Machaneh Natan
  • Matzadot Natan
  • Matzadot Yoav
  • Rahan and Sderot Bases

Air Force

Israel Ground Forces – Infantry

  • Latrun

Air-Force jets will also be a flying over the following cities and towns (from 10:40 am)

Beer Sheva, Yerucham, Dimona, Arad, Kiryat Gat, Jerusalem, Beit Shean, Afula, Nazareth, Tiberias, Katzrin, Tzfat, Carmiel, Nahariya, Haifa, Cesearea, Netanya, TelAviv, Ashdod, Ashkelon, Sderot, Netivot, Ofakim and Hatezerim

Bnei Akiva together with the Minhal Kehilati invite all Rova residents to the annual Yom HaZikaron ceremony which will take place Tuesday evening at 5:30 pm, in the Hurva square (before the ceremony at the Kotel).

Wednesday evening there will be a sicha given by Yeshivat Hakotel Rosh Yeshiva Rav Baruch Wieder at the Hurva at 7:30 pm, followed by a festive tefilla at 8:00 pm. All are invited!

Following the tefilla, join in the dancing with the Akiva Margoliot band in the Hurva Square!

There will be a festive shacharit held at 7:50 am at the Hurva on Thursday morning together with Yeshivat Hakotel.

נשלח לכתובת <mailto:tarbutmatnas@gmail.com> tarbutmatnas@gmail.com

Sorrel Soup

1 Tbsp salt
4-5 medium potatoes (any kind will work), diced
1 medium onion, finely diced
2 Tbsp olive oil
2 large eggs, lightly beaten with a fork
2 Bay Leaves
3 Tbsp Dill (fresh or frozen)
4 cups fresh Schavel, packed, rinsed and chopped (or use 3 cups chopped, frozen Shchavel)
Sour cream or mayo to serve

Sorrel Soup-
How to Make Sorrel Borscht:

1. Fill a large pot with 14 cups vegetable broth. add the 1 Tbsp of salt and simmer.

2. Add diced potatoes, 2 bay leaves and lightly boil 15 minutes or until potatoes can be pierced with a fork.

3. While potatoes are cooking, saute 1 diced onion in 2 Tbsp olive oil over medium heat until golden brown and add to the pot with the soup.

4. Next, lightly beat 2 eggs together and stir them in to the pot.

5. When potatoes are cooked through, stir in Shchavel (Sorrel) and Dill. Return pot to a boil and simmer additional 3-5 minutes or until sorrel is soft. Adding more sorrel will make your soup/borscht more sour.

Serve hot with an optional dollop of sour cream or mayo.
I did not bother with the potatoes and onions. Just heated to broth, added speck of salt and the washed sorrel. Steamed a few minutes. Added sour cream and blended-the cream neutralizes the sour sorrel.

Shchavel Borscht (Sorrel Soup)

תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photo sorrel soup with sour cream‬‏
I omitted the egg too, Will try next time
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photo sorrel soup with sour cream‬‏
תוצאת תמונה עבור ‪photo sorrel soup with sour cream‬‏

In Russia and Ukraine, sorrel is called shchavel’ (щавель). Shchaveloviy borscht or Green borsch is a classic Ukrainian soup – we serve it hot with a dollop of sour cream or mayo.  My mom grows Shchavel in her yard and it’s currently flourishing – time to make soup! If you have a yummy recipe with sorrel, I’d love to hear from you!
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Easy