Post 383: Chanuka experience to visit tombs of the Macabees and their father Mathysahy , Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake to celebrate

Join  a unique Chanuka experience following  in the footsteps of the Macabees in the Modiin region. 

The tour begins with a 360 degree panoramic lookout from Nebi Samuel (Shmuel Hanavi) from where Yehuda HaMacabee launched his heroic battle for the freedom of Jerusalem.

 

The group will continue to modern Modiin to explore recent archaeological sites and their possible connection to ancient Modiin. 

After  break for lunch  enjoy a visit to the tomb of the Macabees and their father Matityahu.

 

A Chanuka journey can’t be complete without “olive oil” and  a stop by the olive oil factory at B’nei Darom.  

I don’t know the Kashrit level of the Olive Oil. 

Where: depart and return to the Inbal Hotel.  The bus will depart from the side street to the right of the hotel when standing in front facing the lobby.

When:  Monday26 December – 26 Kislev – 9:30 – 16:00

Please note: Departure will be on time!

Cost: 165 NIS per participant of any age – all entry fees included.

Payment is due in cash only – 20 minutes prior to boarding.

Please bring the exact amount.

Reservations:  

hillel.leib@gmail.com

Don’t delay in booking your seats.

We are generally sold out, B”H.

 

What to bring/wear? 

Lunch, snacks, water.  Bring your favorite salad or sandwich and more.

Tissues are often helpful when traveling around Israel for bathrooms that might not have. Good walking shoes.

 

Tour is geared for adults including seniors or teens ages 12 and up.

 

Notes:  departure and arrival times are approximate and depend upon several factors including holiday traffic; itinerary, guide and speakers subject to adjustment without prior notice; your reservation is a firm commitment and cannot be cancelled within 48 hours of departure; security will be provided.

Chag Chanukah Sameach!  

Ufaratzta:  Exploring & Celebrating the Kedusha of Eretz Israel   

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake Can Really Taste Great!

20161122_074123.jpg

The version above was my first at scratch attempt at Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake. I eliminated the cream toping.

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

 

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

 

I used tapioka flour, rice flour and potato starch to make the cake, but there are so many flours and starches you can use. It’s okay if you use white or whole wheat flour or other gluten flour. If you’re a celiac or follow a gluten free diet and you prefer to use other flours, you should  consult beflow A guide to  gluten free flours to know what flours you can use instead. If you use other flours and the batter is too thick, add more liquid and if it’s too liquid, add more flour. 

The first was the case with the [ackage mix that I bought.

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

If you can’t find the chocolate hearts, don’t worry, there are so many things you can use instead, like chocolate chips, candy, fruit, chocolate syrup, nuts, seeds, or your favorite foods.

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

Many people avoid extra virgin olive oil to make sweet recipes because it has an intense flavor, but I love it,  although there are many oils you can use. Avoid refined oils please, they’re so unhealthy.

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

 

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

I’ve been using carob powder combined with cocoa powder and it tastes so good and is also healthier, but I prefer cocoa powder, I LOVE its flavor, although carob powder is a great choice and is caffeine-free.

To replace the eggs you can use mashed bananas as I did or applesauce, chia or flax seeds, pumpkin puree, tofu or any other egg replacer.

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

 

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

This vegan gluten free chocolate cake is great for birthdays or any special occasion, although it’s so delicious you don’t need any reason to make it.
Author: Simple Vegan Blog
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: Vegan, Gluten Free
Serves: 8

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup rice flour (140 g)  or
  • 1 cup tapioka flour-which I used
  • ½ cup one kind of potato  stach (100 g)
  • ½ cup another kind of potato starch (110 g)
  • ½ cup carob or unsweetened cocoa powder (50 g)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 2 bananas
  • 1 cup orange juice (250 ml)
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil (125 ml)
  • ¼ cup agave syrup (85 g)
  • dried or frozen blueberries
  • ½ cup coconut sugar (70 g)
  • Vegan whipped cream omitted
  • Chocolate hearts omitted

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat the oven at 180 ºC or 355 ºF. Grease the sides of a cake pan with oil. Place a sheet of parchment paper on the bottom of the cake pan (I use a cake pan with removable bottom, but it’s not necessary).
  2. Combine the dry ingredients in a bowl (teff flour, rice flour, potato starch, carob powder, baking soda and baking powder). Mix well.
  3. Place the rest of the ingredients in a blender (bananas, orange juice, oil, agave syrup and coconut sugar). Blend until smooth.
  4. Combine the dry and wet ingredients and pour the mixture into the cake pan.
  5. Bake for 25 or 30 minutes. Let cool the cake before un molding.
  6.  Frost the cake with the whipped cream and decorate with the chocolate hearts.

    GLUTEN FREE FLOURS AND HOW TO USE THEM I hate to break it to you: Gluten free flours aren’t like gluten.

    Now that we have that out of the way, here’s why they aren’t like gluten:

    1. When using gluten free flours, you have to use at least two different flours. When you used to cook with gluten, you could just dump in some of your whole wheat flour and call it good. Gluten free flours are a bit more temperamental. They don’t do well by themselves. I usually use about 1 cup of starch for every two cups of rice flour, but this depends upon the recipe.
    2. Besides using a few different flours, you’re going to have to use some sort of “gum” or gum substitute to hold everything together. I usually use either xanthan gum or guar gum. The proportions vary, but I tend to use about 1 teaspoon for every 2 cups of flour.or an egg substitute. I used flax meal and the result was satisfactory.

    Below is a chart on gluten-free flours and their consistencies. These certainly aren’t all of the flours out there, but they are the ones I use most often.

    Flour: About: Texture: Substitutes:
    Rice Flour Rice flour is the flour I use most in gluten free baking. Rice flour can sometimes have a rather gritty taste, however, so it has to be mixed with starches. I generally use brown rice flour but if you insist on white rice flour I’m not complaining. Brands we use are: Lundberg, Bob’s Red Mill. Gritty Can usually be exchanged with sorghum flour and oat flour.
    Corn flour I do not use this flour very often, yet it can sometimes substitute for rice flour if I don’t have any at the time. You can also use it in corn breads. gritty Can be exchanged with any of the ‘gritty’ flours.
    Cornmeal This is not really flour. I use it for corn breads and for the surface pans sometimes (Cornmeal on the surface of the pan will cook into the dough and give it a nice crunchy crust). Gluten-Free cornmeal can usually be found at the local grocery store; just be sure to check the label. very gritty. Cannot be exchanged.
    Oat flour Oat flour is one of my favorite flours. It has a nice consistency and makes very good baked goods. I have lately been using oat flour quite a lot because it seems to work better than most other gluten-free flours. Since gf oat flour is expensive, I grind oats in a coffee grinder instead. If you use that method, don’t use the oat flour in cakes or other delicate baked goods.Finely ground oat flour works really well, so if you can get your hands on some of that for a reasonable price, do so.

    Some celiacs are sensitive to oats, so this might not be the best flour for you. You can replace rice flour for oat flour in pretty much every one of my recipes though.

    gritty Can be exchanged with millet flour, rice flour, or sorghum flour.
    Buckwheat flour I don’t use this flour very often because of its coloring, yet it has a good taste and could replace rice flour. Again, be careful about the gluten, and be sure to thoroughly check the label. gritty Cannot be exchanged
    Cornstarch I use cornstarch the most of all the starches, simply because it can be found easily at the local grocery store. Be sure to check the label for gluten-free. Though commonly used as a thickener, cornstarch is a surprisingly good gluten-free flour. It has a nice, fluffy consistency. You do have to use rice flour or some other gritty flour with the cornstarch in order to balance it. Used alone, the results are usually dry and tough and flavorless with an unpleasant mouth feel. starchy and fluffy. Can be exchanged with tapioca or potato starch in gluten-free baking unless stated otherwise in the recipe, but it cannot be replaced in sauces and in some pies. Tapioca and potato starch will form gummy lumps, whereas cornstarch will only thicken a sauce.
    Potato starch Potato starch can create a rather gummy consistency if it is used alone in a recipe. However, mixed with rice flour or some grainy flour it adds pleasant fluff. Note: Do not confuse potato starch with potato flour. They are very different things, believe me. I never use potato flour because it tastes bad and doesn’t work very well. Starchy, (difficult to distinguish between cornstarch and tapioca.) Can be exchanged with cornstarch or tapioca starch except in sauces and sometimes pies.
    Tapioca starch Tapioca starch is commonly used with potato starch in my recipes. It, like cornstarch and potato starch, can’t be used alone in a recipe—it needs rice flour, oat flour, or another gritty flour to balance it out. starchy Can be exchanged with potato starch or cornstarch except in sauces and sometimes pies.
    Sorghum flour Sorghum has a good flavor, and can replace several of the other gritty flours. It tastes good in breads. I wouldn’t use it alone with nothing but starches though. Probably a combo of sorghum with rice, oat, or millet flour. gritty Can be replaced with rice flour, oat flour, or millet flour.
    Millet flour Has good flavor, and a consistency rather like corn flour. It could replace several of the other gritty flours, especially if you want to produce a more “whole grain” flavor in the baked good. gritty Can be replaced with sorghum flour, corn flour, or rice flour.
    Teff flour Teff flour should only be used in small quantity because of its color and the fact that too much of it just plain tastes bad. It has a nice taste when used in moderation and gives a multigrain flavor to most breads. gritty This flour can be replaced by rice flour. When replaced, rise and consistency of the baked good will not be changed. The taste and color, however, will be slightly changed, though not usually in a bad way.
     Almond flour/Almond Meal To avoid confusion right off, the difference between almond meal and almond flour is that in almond flour, the almonds are ground without the skin, whereas almond meal is ground with the skin. This small difference doesn’t seem to affect the baked goods though.This flour is still in the testing stage for me. It’s used a lot in paleo baked goods, and I’ve used it by itself before. The results are always a little gritty and sometimes a bit too moist (to the point of being heavy and gummy), since almond flour contains a lot of moisture. I have used it in cakes in small quantity with rice flour and starch with good results.  Gritty but adds moisture to baked goods.  Can’t be exchanged.

    Obviously, they don’t contain that “stretchy” quality that gluten can produce in your dough. The most noticeable difference between gf flours and gluten can be seen in bread dough. If you try to make bread the gluten way, you’re going to fail and cry and probably need counseling before you can be happy again

     

    Second cake:

    GLUTEN-FREE CHOCOLATE ZUCCHINI CAKE OR CUPCAKES-Have not tried this one yet!

    This is a great way to use up all those overgrown garden zucchinis. Who knew that mashed up green vegetables could taste so good?

    CHOCOLATE ZUCCHINI CAKE/PUMPKIN

    Serves: 10

    Time: 30 minutes active, 45 minutes cooking.

    Cream Together- I will be doubling the quantities

    and weighed out as well  the zucchini and pumpkin  

    1 stick (½ cup) butter, soft but still cold or 1/4 cup commercial soy milk + l/4 cup olive oil

    1 2/3 white granulated sugar or less by 1/3 = 5/3X1/3=5/9 : 5/3=15/9-5/9 = 10/9 = 11/9 cup sugar or slightly more that 1 cup sugar

    Add and beat well:

    2 large eggs or 1 egg and 1/2 cup of flax meal

    Add and beat in:

    3/4 cup rice flour

    1/4 cup almond flour/ walnut flour

    ½ cup cornstarch (check label for gluten-free)

    1 cup pureed fresh zucchini (I use our electric mixer)

    ½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder (try dutch cocoa for extra-dark chocolate yumminess!)

    ¾ teaspoon xanthan gum-omitted

    ¼ teaspoon salt

    1 teaspoon baking powder

    Beat until well-blended and smooth. You can use a greased 8×8” square baking pan, a 9” round one, or a 12 cupcake pan with waxed paper cupcake holders. Bake at 350 degrees F for 40-45 minutes.

    Makes 1 cake or 12 cupcakes. I doubled he recipe and make 12 – 75 gram cupcakes with an additional 1/8 cup of vegetables mixed in. Also added blueberries and chocolate bits. Since I double the recipe, my cupcakes are larger and made 14.

    I want to make a batch of pumpkin and another of zucchini, I prepared 4 cups of the dry ingredients.

  7. .

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s