Post 388: A Search for a Lost and Found Office lead me to a meeting with Tamar, a Betzalel Fashion Design Graduate and owner of a shop called Shatnez, TUESDAY, December / Kislev 13 (a) 18:30 – “All of Us Is Amona” in Paris Sq, Jerusalem ; Special demonstration for Amona http://www.eish-l.org/s/vzlits http://www.eish-l.org/s/1ain4y 19:00 – Friends of the IDF , Annual Memorial Lecture Wednesday, Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, December 14th 4:30 PM Mishkenot Sha’anamin Conference Center 9 Yemin Moshe Street Making the Case for Israel: US Presidential Election: American Jewry and Israel: Ambassador Dore Gold President of the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs in Dialogue with Prof. Alan Dershowitz, Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

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Last week I stumbled upon a shop called Shatnez in Binyan Klal. The designation Shatnez, is familiar to observant Jews, but not as a shop. Shatnez is a mixture of wool and linen, and the combination is forbidden:

Definition of shatnez material. In the Torah, one is prohibited from wearing shatnez only after it has been carded, woven, and twisted, but the rabbis prohibit it if it has been subjected to any one of these operations. Hence felt made with a mixture of wool compressed together with linen is forbidden.

Torah‎: ‎Leviticus 19:19 and Deuteronomy 22:11

The owner of the shop, Tamar, doesn’t sell Shatnez. It’s possible that a garment in the shop would contain shatnez, wool and linen combined in a section of

the item as the collar, cuffs or waistline.

It would be up to the purchaser to be aware of that and have the  garment inspected by the various Shatnez laboratories in Jerusalem.

Next time we meet, I’ll (B’H) ask Tamar why she calls the shop by that name.

She explicitly designs with used materials, with a sense of frugality.

These recycled fabrics may have been on the street or dropped off at her shop.

The items appeared clean, but of-course washing before wearing is recommended.

In fact-“Upscaling” was her design option at Betzalel School of Art, part of Hebrew University.

I was immediately on her side. This is beyond a second hand clothing store. Tamar’s sewing machine is tucked in front. Just take a look at this summer skirt, a combination of two men size shirts and sized for a lady leaving the uneven shirt bottom.

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There are a few new designed skirts  on the inside rack along the entrance wall. Several well tailored classic straight skirts are among the collection.

There are many ways one can harness Tamar’s talents. If you have a wool or silk garment that is “Out of Style” and it’s  perfectly new, she would have some ideas on “Upcycling” it.  If most of your closet is in that unusable category consider donating the items to her. She will use every one!

I have hesitated to turn my clothing in this category  to a gemach. A gemach is a charity. Usually the clothing is sold very cheaply and the profits provide for poor brides.

The items are generally style and date challenged and need a home with just the right gal.

Just don’t bring summer clothing to Tamar now. Below is a wool and mohair long sleeve wide men’s sweater that was “upscaled” to a skirt. The sleeves were turned into a shawl collar and a cap.

 

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Bring your excess collection of hats, shoes and jewelry to Shatnez. and they will be singing again. Tamar is just the right one for the part.

Shatnez: Closed Sunday:

Monday-Thursday: 11-7PM

Friday: 11-2PM

Directions: Binyan Klal Building, 97 Jaffa Road
Jerusalem. Shatnes in on the Food Court level next to the escalators and opposite a sporting goods shop with large posters of basketball players displayed in the windows.

 

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This photo depicts a group of Ethiopian workers in Keren Avraham. or Avraham’s Vineyard.

One recognizes Keren Avraham as a neighborhood in Geula in central Jerusalem. The vineyard was founded in 1855 by James Finn, British Consul in Ottoman Jerusalem, and his wife Elizabeth Anne Finn. Finn was a devout Christian, who belonged to the London Society for Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews. It is said that he  did not engage in missionary work during his years in Jerusalem.

In 1853, Finn purchased Karm al-Khalil (“Abraham’s Vineyard”), a 10-acre plot of barren land outside the walls of the Old City. There he established “The Industrial Plantation for Employment of Jews in Jerusalem” to train Jews in agriculture and other trades so they could become self-supporting, rather than relying on the welfare distribution. The manager was a Christian named Dunn who believed he was a descendant of the tribe of Dan. Finn employed Jewish laborers to build the first house there in 1855 and cisterns for water storage were built.

The Ethiopian workers in the photograph were skilled stone masons. Notice their modest garments worn to shreds.  In these pious tzadikim’s  merit, one should try to find a use for clothing and not add them to the waste stream.

Two events taking place this week in Mirkaz Ha’Ir:

 TUESDAY, December / Kislev 13
(a) 18:30 – “All of Us Is Amona” in Paris Sq, Jerusalem
Details & Transportation: 1700-550-070, http://www.eish-l.org/s/vzlits
http://www.eish-l.org/s/1ain4y

Also: Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs Registration: ahuva@jcpa.org

Annual Memorial Lecture Wednesday, Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, December 14th 4:30 PM Mishkenot Sha’anamin Conference Center

9 Yemin Moshe Street

Making the Case for Israel: US Presidential Election: American Jewry and Israel: Ambassador Dore Gold President of the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs in Dialogue with Prof. Alan Dershowitz, Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

 

 

 

 

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