Post 403: Aishe Ha Torah’s Women’s Program honoring the 8th Yahrzeit of Rabbi Noach Weinberg ZT”L Recharge your grimy garage furniture, finding a radio shelf in an old swing seat

I’d like to attend one or two of these programs. It is a must to register:

It all depends if the workers are out our apartment. We are till in the throws of renovation and next weeks painter, carpenter, plumber, electrician and cleanup., all sent by the  Kablan of my upstairs  neighbor.. May Hashem bless his soul.

The thread through this post is realizing that the old can be made new.

Recharge, unite, and empower at Aish HaTorah’s Yarchei Kallah. This February, men and women from across the globe are coming together to commemorate the 8th yahrtzeit of HaRav Noach Weinberg zt”l. Join us in Jerusalem for incredible learning with unbelievable teachers. HaRav Asher Weiss, HaRav Yaakov Hillel, HaRav Yitzchok Berkowitz, and many more will give over the wisdom of the Rosh Yeshiva zt”l. Many visitors from abroad are also attending. For more information or to sign up, go to www.aishjerusalem.com, email info@aishjerusalem.com, or call 718-513-7838 or +972-73-229-3400.

Held in the Old City at Aish Ha Torah Women’s Center-Feb 5th to Feb 9th

50 Sh for the morning 60 Sh includes lunch.

I am restoring a glass doored bookcase and looking for the easiest method for cleaning the oak back. Probably I will go with the first as I’ve seen it in several places on line method.

I found hardware store owners to be exceptionally knowledgable. Perhaps you are arranging the dreaded painter’s arrival. The hardware store on Rechove Yaako Mayer and  27 Rechove Malkei Ysroal in Meah Shaarim is a second generation operation. Elan’s back room is huge and a whole shelf is devoted to tapes including the  cloth backed wide black tape, used for binding books and the 3M masking tape for masking painted surfaces etc. The black tape is preferable for use with glass or any unpainted surface. It is expensive, however it can be cut into strips.20170127_104109.jpg

The following discussion is related to the bookcase that is being restored to be a room divider. I am becoming more comfortable using several Makita hand sanders. Have decided to just refinish the top of the bookcase and leave the painted finish as is.

Still the back oak panel will be cleaned by one of the methods below. If I get it started then the Kablan’s worker will continue. Trying the non -toxic method first. Following is the photo of the radio shelf to be. It was the practice piece that was used to get the feel of hand electric sanders.20170126_133313.jpg20170126_104613.jpg

Removing Dirt Build Up

*This method is only for wood furniture that is not painted as it will damage and/or remove the paint.

You Will Need:

  • Boiled linseed oil (do NOT use raw linseed oil)
  • Turpentine
  • White vinegar
  • Soft cloths
  • Old toothbrush
  • Drop cloth, cardboard or other ground covering
  • Rubber gloves
  • Small disposable container
  • Paint stir stick
  • Face mask (optional)
  • Paper towels
  • Vacuum with attachments

Steps to Remove the Dirt Build Up:

  1. Start by selecting a work area that is very well ventilated. Working outdoors is best as this solution produces a strong smell that you don’t want lingering in your home.
  2. Prepare the work area by covering the ground with a protective covering such as a drop cloth, large sheets of cardboard, etc. Gather rubber gloves and a mask for yourself.
  3. Bring the wooden piece outdoors and begin by wiping it down with the paper towels to remove as much of the grime as possible. After you have wiped it off, use the vacuum with the brush attachment to gently brush dirt from the crevices and corners.
  4. Next, mix together equal parts of the linseed oil, turpentine and white vinegar.
  5. Moisten the soft cloths lightly with the solution and gently wipe the dirt and grime off of the wood surface. As you are cleaning, wipe the liquid with the grain of the wood and take caution not to soak the wood.
  6. Continue cleaning with the cloths just until the dirt is gone, do not scrub too much or it may damage the finish.
  7. For corners, designs, etc., dip the old toothbrush into the solution and gently work it into the grooves. Follow the grain as much as possible just as before. Wipe away with a clean cloth.
  8. When no more dirt is showing on the cloths, discontinue any further applications. There is no need to rinse the wood.
  9. Allow the piece to dry completely.
  10. When the piece is completely dry, buff with a clean cloth to restore the shine.
  11. Dispose of any remaining cleaner as well as any cloths with cleaner on them using appropriate methods. They can automatically combust and start a fire, so be sure to dispose of them promptly and properly.

2-Removing Dirt Build Up Without Chemicals http://www.howtocleanstuff.net/how-to-remove-dirt-build-up-from-wooden-furniture/

You Will Need:

  • Lemon juice
  • Olive oil
  • Soft cloths
  • Old toothbrush
  • Drop cloth, cardboard or other ground covering
  • Rubber gloves (optional)
  • Small container
  • Paper towels
  • Vacuum with attachments

Steps to Remove the Dirt Build Up:

Getting comfortable with power tools.20170126_104613.jpg

  1. 20170126_133313.jpg

    Start by selecting a work area that has plenty of room to easily maneuver around your piece. Working outdoors or in the garage is often best.

  2. Prepare the work area by covering the ground with a protective covering such as a drop cloth, large sheets of cardboard, etc.

  3. Bring the wooden piece outdoors and begin by wiping the entire piece down with the paper cloths to remove as much of the grime as possible. After you have wiped it off, use the vacuum with the brush attachment to gently brush dirt from the crevices and corners.

  4. Next, mix together two parts olive oil with one part lemon juice.

  5. Moisten the soft cloths lightly with the solution and gently wipe the dirt and grime off of the wood surface. As you are cleaning, wipe the liquid with the grain of the wood and take caution not to soak the wood.

  6. Continue cleaning with the cloths just until the dirt is gone, do not scrub too much or it may damage the finish.

  7. For corners, designs, etc., dip the old toothbrush into the solution and gently work it into the grooves. Follow the grain as much as possible just as before. Wipe away with a clean cloth

  8. Clear Finishes: Mix up equal parts of paint thinner and a mild soap, such as Murphy Oil Soap, and apply with a sponge or paintbrush. Wipe the solution away with a rag to clear the dirt; you’ll likely remove a thin layer of varnish or shellac, too, because the grime has melded with it.

  9. Or

    0000 steel wool with mineral spirits. It takes off dirt and wax build up. Sometimes you don’t even have to re stain the wood just use wax or whatever you want to seal it.

    · Cleaner #3. This is similar to cleaner #1. It can be used on fine antiques, finishes which have been damaged by water, and extremely grimy finishes. Materials Needed. Small flat can or jar Boiled linseed oil Gum turpentine White vinegar 0000 steel wool Soft, clean cloths Making the Cleaner. Mix equal parts of boiled linseed oil, gum turpentine, and white vinegar in the can or jar. This cleaner cannot be stored for later use because it will curdle.

    Dip a piece of 0000 steel wool into the mixture. Gently rub the piece, rubbing with the grain of the wood. Clean a small area at a time. Remove all traces of the mixture with a soft clean cloth. Continue cleaning small areas until the~ entire piece of furniture is covered. Throw away the mixture and the cloths when you finish. Waxing. After cleaning, let the furniture dry completely. Then use a good furniture wax, according to the manufacturer’s instructions, to restore the shine.

    20170121_190301.jpgI’ve forgotten what our floor looks like. It has been under brown paper for about 3 weeks.  I’ve learned how to use an orbital and vibrating  sander. Above top of bookcase before using power tools, just sandpaper.

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