Category Archives: Travel Israel

Post 420: Did you know that the Smithsonian has Phyllis Diller’s 55,000 jokes collecting dust waiting to be transcribed. They are seeking volunteers to transcribe. https://seniorplanet.org/this-crowdsourcing-project-needs-your-sense-of-humor/?utm_source=Senior+Planet+Email+List&utm_campaign=9ad9ae45f4-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_02_13&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_7aaa498d1b-9ad9ae45f4-419030001&mc_cid=9ad9ae45f4&mc_eid=d35264408c – Take Time before Time Takes You (By Paul Carvel) with a Walking Tour of Nachlaot and making a SLOW cooking Persian New Year Noodle soup by Joan Nathan

Some unusual opportunities on line and in Jerusalem: Did you know that the Smithsonian has Phyllis Diller’s 55,000 jokes collecting dust waiting  to be transcribed? They are seeking volunteers to transcribe. Use the following link:

https://seniorplanet.org/this-crowdsourcing-project-needs-your-sense-of-humor/?utm_source=Senior+Planet+Email+List&utm_campaign=9ad9ae45f4-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_02_13&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_7aaa498d1b-9ad9ae45f4-419030001&mc_cid=9ad9ae45f4&mc_eid=d35264408c

Travel bloggers’ conference this week in Jerusalem

TBEX (Travel Blog Exchange), the largest conference and networking event for travel bloggers and online travel journalists, will this week assemble in Jerusalem for their first International Conference March 20-22, 2017, at the ICC Jerusalem International Convention Center.

The conference, which will bring together around 400 travel bloggers, writers, and industry professionals from around the world, is being held in partnership with the Jerusalem Conventions and Visitors Bureau (JCVB) under the direction of the Jerusalem Development Authority (JDA).

דער וואָס הערטפאַרגעסט, דער וואָס זעט – געדענקט, דער וואָס

טוט – פאַרשטייט

transliterated

der vo hert – fargest, der vos zet – gedenkt, der vos tut – farshteyt

the saying actually means

He that listens – forgets, he that sees – remembers, he that does – understands

Chaim Werdyger

You can know an area only by walking it. Do the Walking Tour of Nachlaot: Distance: almost 2 Km

 Time: 1¼-1½ hours-

Stopping to photograph will extend this tour, especially if you like to speak with passersby.

Difficulty: This is very easy walking on roads and alleys, and is suitable for wheelchairs and strollers. In fact, you will probably meet a lot of strollers on this walk!

Parking. There is a parking lot in the Clal Building on Kiah St (which means “All Ysrael Chaverim”) and also a parking lot opposite this on Kiah St.

Starting point: Start the walk at the junction of Agrippas St and King George, between the pizza store and falafel bar. The walk ends at the light rail station for Mahane Yehuda.

 Walk along Agrippas St, which is here a vehicle-free pedestrian walkway, and opposite the traffic circle turn right and enter Harav Haim Elboher Alley via the archway. Very soon you come to the sixth neighborhood built outside the Old City, Even Yisrael, constructed in the late 1870’s. Many of the houses here have a dilapidated look, as they have not undergone the renovations that typify much of Nachlaot. Nevertheless, few people know about this quarter and the square is a pleasant oasis of quiet just a short distance from bustling King George Street. Interesting photos with descriptions of some of the original inhabitants of Even Yisrael found on the right hand side of the tiled circle are worth viewing. 

 The grass courtyard. Standing in the far end is a building with a low blue door. This was the first Sephardic Orphanage founded in 1908.

 

  •  Exit the square by the alley on the far left (but not the exit to Jaffa St). Turn right onto Mashiya Baruchof St by the orphanage and peep down the first road on your left. The first door on the left is the non-used entrance to the synagogue Achdut Yisrael (the current entrance is round the back), which is the synagogue of former Lechi fighters of the underground movement. It is the only synagogue I know of that includes pictures of weapons as part of the interior decoration. It is not open during the week but is popular on Shabbat. Retrace your steps back along Mashiya Boruchof St and continue towards Agrippas St, passing by a row of restaurants.

  • Cross over the road and turn into Mishkanot St under the brick arch. (If there is a lot of traffic, it is safer to continue along Agrippas St and to use the pedestrian crossing at the intersection of Agripas St and Ki’ach St and then to turn back to Mishkanot St).

 On your right as you walk along Mishkanot St are the outer walls of houses of the Mishkenot Yisrael Quarter (Dwelling Places of Israel). This housing estate was erected in the 1870’s to 1880’s. You can peep into the courtyard of Mishkenot Yisrael from Berab Street, which is the first turning on your right.

 Continue along Mishkanot St and take the second turning on your right from Agripas St onto Rabbi Arye Street. At the end of this block you will come to the very modest home of Rabbi Aryeh Levin (1885-1969).

 Continue on Rabbi Arye St. past Shomron St. and you will see that you are walking past the outer walls of a second neighborhood, Mazkeret Moshe. Continue past the second-hand clothes store and turn right on Shirizli St.

 You are now in the courtyard of the Mazkeret Moshe Quarter, founded in 1882 by the Sir Moses Montefiore Testimonial Fund. The gallery, kindergarten and community center are later additions to the neighborhood and from an architectural perspective fit in rather poorly. Continue to the end of Shirizli St. and turn left onto Hakarmel St.

 Almost immediately you will see an archway and alley on your right that leads to Agrippas St. Turn down this alley and above the archway facing Agrippas St. you will see a memorial testimonial to Sir Moses Montefiore. Then turn back onto Hakarmel St.

 Continue on Hakarmel St. and pass the colorful face of the Hesed Verachamim Synagogue. This is fairly recent and shows the symbols of the 12 tribes, the lamp, the Torah, and words of the poem “A woman of valor who can find.” Continue past Mazqeret Moshe St. and head towards the courtyard of the third neighborhood, the Ohel Moshe Quarter. This was the Sephardi equivalent of the Ashkenazi Mazkeret Moshe Quarter. On the outer walls of the houses are photos and descriptions of families who who lived here. They are fascinating to read for a perspective on the people who lived here. At the edge of the courtyard, you can turn right onto Hahermon St. to look at another plaque to Sr Moses Montefiore on top of the archway facing Agrippas St.

 Now proceed in the other direction along Hahermon St., past the Beit Avraham and Ohel Sarah synagogues on your right and a serene garden on your left, and walk over the covered cisterns. There are more photos on the walls of the buildings, including one of the family of Yitzhak Navon who was President of the State of Israel from 1978 to 1983. He was a Sephardi who was born in this quarter, the fifth president of Israel, and the first president to be born in this country. Prior presidents were born in Russia.

At the end of Haherman St. turn left, and then first right onto Ohel Moshe St. One intersection before the end of the street, turn left onto Hagilboa St. and pass the Great Synagogue Ohel Moshe founded by Sir Moses Montefiore.

 Turn right on Mazqeret Mosheh St. and continue until the end of the road. In front of you is the Batei Broide Quarter which was established in 1903 for the poor. You might want to peep into the courtyard. The charter drawn up by Rabbi Brodie who spearheaded this project stipulated that the houses be used only by Torah scholars from the Perushim (anti-Hasidic) community.

 Now turn right on Hatavor St. At the end of Hatavor St, turn left onto Ezra Refael St. At the end of this street turn right onto Rama St., and then first left onto Shilo St.

 Turn into the first street on your right, which is Beer Sheva St. You are now in the beautiful Nahalat Zion Quarter. Immediately on the left is the famous Adas Synagogue of Aleppo. Walk through this beautiful neighborhood with its shrubs, trees and flowers in its central courtyard and surrounding houses.

 Continue to the very end of Beer Sheba St. and and follow the alley which curves to the right. Turn right opposite the Keter Torah Synagogue onto Givon St (which is not marked), and walk up the series of steps.

 Take the third street on the left – Ovadia Someach St. Look particularly for #11 in this very quaint street which is the Beit Yitzchak Synagogue. This is a Kurdish synagogue that was founded in 1894. If it is open for prayer services, it is worth taking a look inside. Otherwise look through the windows. Continue straight ahead to Agrippas St and turn right.

The famous Mahane Yehuda market (“the shuk”) is soon in front of you on the other side of the road. Cross Agrippas St. at the crossing just before Ezra Rafael St. After crossing this road, take the first left to a section of the covered market. You will pass a number of popular and reasonably priced restaurants. The Mahane Market synagogue is on the right just past the restaurants. This must be the only market in the world with a synagogue! The times of prayer are noted outside.

At the end of the street turn right and then turn left onto Etz Khayim St., the main thoroughfare of the covered part of the market. Yeshivah Etz Khayim began in 1908.

 Just before the end of this street, turn left into an alley between two vegetable/fruit stalls. You are now in the Georgian Market, so-called because the stalls are owned by people formerly from Georgia. There is a WC here. Follow the alley to the left and then take the first right and you will be on Machane Yehuda St. and the uncovered part of the market. Turn right and you will soon reach Jaffa St. The light rail stop for Mahane Yehuda is closeby on your left.

 More about walking tours; http://inandaroundjerusalem.com/

Now is a good time to start depleting your beans before Passover:

Persian New Year  Noodle soup https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/4988-persian-new-year-noodle-soup?action=click&module=Collection+Page+Recipe+Card&region=Recipes+for+Nowruz%2C+the+Persian+New+Year&pgType=collection&rank=21 by Joan Nathan

INGREDIENTS

FOR THE SOUP:

  • ¼ cup dried chickpeas

  • ¼ cup dried navy beans

  • ¼ cup dried red kidney beans

  • 14 cups cold water

  • 3 large onions, peeled and thinly sliced

  • 5 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed

  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil

  • 2 teaspoons salt

  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper

  • 1 teaspoon turmeric

  • ½ cup lentils

  • 2 cups beef broth/vegetable broth

  • ½ cup coarsely chopped chives or scallions

  • ½ cup chopped fresh dill

  • 1 cup coarsely chopped parsley

  • 6 cups fresh spinach, washed and chopped, or 3 cups frozen spinach, chopped

  • 1 fresh beet, peeled and diced in 1/2-inch pieces

  • ½ pound Persian noodles, available in Middle Eastern specialty food stores, or linguine, broken in half

  • 2 tablespoons wine vinegar or to taste

FOR THE GARNISH:

  • 1 onion, peeled and thinly sliced

  • 6 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

  • 1 teaspoon turmeric

  • ¼ teaspoon salt

  • ½ cup fresh mint, chopped

     PREPARATION
  1. Soak chickpeas, navy beans and kidney beans in 2 cups of water for 2 hours. Drain.

  2. In a large pot, brown the onions and garlic in the oil over medium heat. Add the salt, pepper, and turmeric, and saute for 1 minute more. Add the soaked beans and saute for 3 minutes, coating the beans with the oil and spices. Add the remaining 12 cups of water, and bring to a boil, skimming off the foam as it forms. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 45 minutes.

  3. Add lentils and beef broth, and simmer 50 minutes more.

  4. Add chopped chives or scallions, dill, parsley, spinach and the beet. Continue cooking, stirring occasionally, for 1 hour, or until beans are tender. Correct seasonings, and add more water if soup is too thick.

  5. Add noodles, and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

  6. Stir in the vinegar, and mix well.

  7. To prepare the mint garnish, brown the onions and the garlic in the oil in a small skillet. Remove from heat; add turmeric, salt and mint, and mix well.

  8. Ladle soup into the bowls, and top with the mint garnish.

Post 383: Chanuka experience to visit tombs of the Macabees and their father Mathysahy , Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake to celebrate

Join  a unique Chanuka experience following  in the footsteps of the Macabees in the Modiin region. 

The tour begins with a 360 degree panoramic lookout from Nebi Samuel (Shmuel Hanavi) from where Yehuda HaMacabee launched his heroic battle for the freedom of Jerusalem.

 

The group will continue to modern Modiin to explore recent archaeological sites and their possible connection to ancient Modiin. 

After  break for lunch  enjoy a visit to the tomb of the Macabees and their father Matityahu.

 

A Chanuka journey can’t be complete without “olive oil” and  a stop by the olive oil factory at B’nei Darom.  

I don’t know the Kashrit level of the Olive Oil. 

Where: depart and return to the Inbal Hotel.  The bus will depart from the side street to the right of the hotel when standing in front facing the lobby.

When:  Monday26 December – 26 Kislev – 9:30 – 16:00

Please note: Departure will be on time!

Cost: 165 NIS per participant of any age – all entry fees included.

Payment is due in cash only – 20 minutes prior to boarding.

Please bring the exact amount.

Reservations:  

hillel.leib@gmail.com

Don’t delay in booking your seats.

We are generally sold out, B”H.

 

What to bring/wear? 

Lunch, snacks, water.  Bring your favorite salad or sandwich and more.

Tissues are often helpful when traveling around Israel for bathrooms that might not have. Good walking shoes.

 

Tour is geared for adults including seniors or teens ages 12 and up.

 

Notes:  departure and arrival times are approximate and depend upon several factors including holiday traffic; itinerary, guide and speakers subject to adjustment without prior notice; your reservation is a firm commitment and cannot be cancelled within 48 hours of departure; security will be provided.

Chag Chanukah Sameach!  

Ufaratzta:  Exploring & Celebrating the Kedusha of Eretz Israel   

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake Can Really Taste Great!

20161122_074123.jpg

The version above was my first at scratch attempt at Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake. I eliminated the cream toping.

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

 

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

 

I used tapioka flour, rice flour and potato starch to make the cake, but there are so many flours and starches you can use. It’s okay if you use white or whole wheat flour or other gluten flour. If you’re a celiac or follow a gluten free diet and you prefer to use other flours, you should  consult beflow A guide to  gluten free flours to know what flours you can use instead. If you use other flours and the batter is too thick, add more liquid and if it’s too liquid, add more flour. 

The first was the case with the [ackage mix that I bought.

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

If you can’t find the chocolate hearts, don’t worry, there are so many things you can use instead, like chocolate chips, candy, fruit, chocolate syrup, nuts, seeds, or your favorite foods.

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

Many people avoid extra virgin olive oil to make sweet recipes because it has an intense flavor, but I love it,  although there are many oils you can use. Avoid refined oils please, they’re so unhealthy.

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

 

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

I’ve been using carob powder combined with cocoa powder and it tastes so good and is also healthier, but I prefer cocoa powder, I LOVE its flavor, although carob powder is a great choice and is caffeine-free.

To replace the eggs you can use mashed bananas as I did or applesauce, chia or flax seeds, pumpkin puree, tofu or any other egg replacer.

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

 

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

This vegan gluten free chocolate cake is great for birthdays or any special occasion, although it’s so delicious you don’t need any reason to make it.
Author: Simple Vegan Blog
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: Vegan, Gluten Free
Serves: 8

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup rice flour (140 g)  or
  • 1 cup tapioka flour-which I used
  • ½ cup one kind of potato  stach (100 g)
  • ½ cup another kind of potato starch (110 g)
  • ½ cup carob or unsweetened cocoa powder (50 g)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 2 bananas
  • 1 cup orange juice (250 ml)
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil (125 ml)
  • ¼ cup agave syrup (85 g)
  • dried or frozen blueberries
  • ½ cup coconut sugar (70 g)
  • Vegan whipped cream omitted
  • Chocolate hearts omitted

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat the oven at 180 ºC or 355 ºF. Grease the sides of a cake pan with oil. Place a sheet of parchment paper on the bottom of the cake pan (I use a cake pan with removable bottom, but it’s not necessary).
  2. Combine the dry ingredients in a bowl (teff flour, rice flour, potato starch, carob powder, baking soda and baking powder). Mix well.
  3. Place the rest of the ingredients in a blender (bananas, orange juice, oil, agave syrup and coconut sugar). Blend until smooth.
  4. Combine the dry and wet ingredients and pour the mixture into the cake pan.
  5. Bake for 25 or 30 minutes. Let cool the cake before un molding.
  6.  Frost the cake with the whipped cream and decorate with the chocolate hearts.

    GLUTEN FREE FLOURS AND HOW TO USE THEM I hate to break it to you: Gluten free flours aren’t like gluten.

    Now that we have that out of the way, here’s why they aren’t like gluten:

    1. When using gluten free flours, you have to use at least two different flours. When you used to cook with gluten, you could just dump in some of your whole wheat flour and call it good. Gluten free flours are a bit more temperamental. They don’t do well by themselves. I usually use about 1 cup of starch for every two cups of rice flour, but this depends upon the recipe.
    2. Besides using a few different flours, you’re going to have to use some sort of “gum” or gum substitute to hold everything together. I usually use either xanthan gum or guar gum. The proportions vary, but I tend to use about 1 teaspoon for every 2 cups of flour.or an egg substitute. I used flax meal and the result was satisfactory.

    Below is a chart on gluten-free flours and their consistencies. These certainly aren’t all of the flours out there, but they are the ones I use most often.

    Flour: About: Texture: Substitutes:
    Rice Flour Rice flour is the flour I use most in gluten free baking. Rice flour can sometimes have a rather gritty taste, however, so it has to be mixed with starches. I generally use brown rice flour but if you insist on white rice flour I’m not complaining. Brands we use are: Lundberg, Bob’s Red Mill. Gritty Can usually be exchanged with sorghum flour and oat flour.
    Corn flour I do not use this flour very often, yet it can sometimes substitute for rice flour if I don’t have any at the time. You can also use it in corn breads. gritty Can be exchanged with any of the ‘gritty’ flours.
    Cornmeal This is not really flour. I use it for corn breads and for the surface pans sometimes (Cornmeal on the surface of the pan will cook into the dough and give it a nice crunchy crust). Gluten-Free cornmeal can usually be found at the local grocery store; just be sure to check the label. very gritty. Cannot be exchanged.
    Oat flour Oat flour is one of my favorite flours. It has a nice consistency and makes very good baked goods. I have lately been using oat flour quite a lot because it seems to work better than most other gluten-free flours. Since gf oat flour is expensive, I grind oats in a coffee grinder instead. If you use that method, don’t use the oat flour in cakes or other delicate baked goods.Finely ground oat flour works really well, so if you can get your hands on some of that for a reasonable price, do so.

    Some celiacs are sensitive to oats, so this might not be the best flour for you. You can replace rice flour for oat flour in pretty much every one of my recipes though.

    gritty Can be exchanged with millet flour, rice flour, or sorghum flour.
    Buckwheat flour I don’t use this flour very often because of its coloring, yet it has a good taste and could replace rice flour. Again, be careful about the gluten, and be sure to thoroughly check the label. gritty Cannot be exchanged
    Cornstarch I use cornstarch the most of all the starches, simply because it can be found easily at the local grocery store. Be sure to check the label for gluten-free. Though commonly used as a thickener, cornstarch is a surprisingly good gluten-free flour. It has a nice, fluffy consistency. You do have to use rice flour or some other gritty flour with the cornstarch in order to balance it. Used alone, the results are usually dry and tough and flavorless with an unpleasant mouth feel. starchy and fluffy. Can be exchanged with tapioca or potato starch in gluten-free baking unless stated otherwise in the recipe, but it cannot be replaced in sauces and in some pies. Tapioca and potato starch will form gummy lumps, whereas cornstarch will only thicken a sauce.
    Potato starch Potato starch can create a rather gummy consistency if it is used alone in a recipe. However, mixed with rice flour or some grainy flour it adds pleasant fluff. Note: Do not confuse potato starch with potato flour. They are very different things, believe me. I never use potato flour because it tastes bad and doesn’t work very well. Starchy, (difficult to distinguish between cornstarch and tapioca.) Can be exchanged with cornstarch or tapioca starch except in sauces and sometimes pies.
    Tapioca starch Tapioca starch is commonly used with potato starch in my recipes. It, like cornstarch and potato starch, can’t be used alone in a recipe—it needs rice flour, oat flour, or another gritty flour to balance it out. starchy Can be exchanged with potato starch or cornstarch except in sauces and sometimes pies.
    Sorghum flour Sorghum has a good flavor, and can replace several of the other gritty flours. It tastes good in breads. I wouldn’t use it alone with nothing but starches though. Probably a combo of sorghum with rice, oat, or millet flour. gritty Can be replaced with rice flour, oat flour, or millet flour.
    Millet flour Has good flavor, and a consistency rather like corn flour. It could replace several of the other gritty flours, especially if you want to produce a more “whole grain” flavor in the baked good. gritty Can be replaced with sorghum flour, corn flour, or rice flour.
    Teff flour Teff flour should only be used in small quantity because of its color and the fact that too much of it just plain tastes bad. It has a nice taste when used in moderation and gives a multigrain flavor to most breads. gritty This flour can be replaced by rice flour. When replaced, rise and consistency of the baked good will not be changed. The taste and color, however, will be slightly changed, though not usually in a bad way.
     Almond flour/Almond Meal To avoid confusion right off, the difference between almond meal and almond flour is that in almond flour, the almonds are ground without the skin, whereas almond meal is ground with the skin. This small difference doesn’t seem to affect the baked goods though.This flour is still in the testing stage for me. It’s used a lot in paleo baked goods, and I’ve used it by itself before. The results are always a little gritty and sometimes a bit too moist (to the point of being heavy and gummy), since almond flour contains a lot of moisture. I have used it in cakes in small quantity with rice flour and starch with good results.  Gritty but adds moisture to baked goods.  Can’t be exchanged.

    Obviously, they don’t contain that “stretchy” quality that gluten can produce in your dough. The most noticeable difference between gf flours and gluten can be seen in bread dough. If you try to make bread the gluten way, you’re going to fail and cry and probably need counseling before you can be happy again

     

    Second cake:

    GLUTEN-FREE CHOCOLATE ZUCCHINI CAKE OR CUPCAKES-Have not tried this one yet!

    This is a great way to use up all those overgrown garden zucchinis. Who knew that mashed up green vegetables could taste so good?

    CHOCOLATE ZUCCHINI CAKE/PUMPKIN

    Serves: 10

    Time: 30 minutes active, 45 minutes cooking.

    Cream Together- I will be doubling the quantities

    and weighed out as well  the zucchini and pumpkin  

    1 stick (½ cup) butter, soft but still cold or 1/4 cup commercial soy milk + l/4 cup olive oil

    1 2/3 white granulated sugar or less by 1/3 = 5/3X1/3=5/9 : 5/3=15/9-5/9 = 10/9 = 11/9 cup sugar or slightly more that 1 cup sugar

    Add and beat well:

    2 large eggs or 1 egg and 1/2 cup of flax meal

    Add and beat in:

    3/4 cup rice flour

    1/4 cup almond flour/ walnut flour

    ½ cup cornstarch (check label for gluten-free)

    1 cup pureed fresh zucchini (I use our electric mixer)

    ½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder (try dutch cocoa for extra-dark chocolate yumminess!)

    ¾ teaspoon xanthan gum-omitted

    ¼ teaspoon salt

    1 teaspoon baking powder

    Beat until well-blended and smooth. You can use a greased 8×8” square baking pan, a 9” round one, or a 12 cupcake pan with waxed paper cupcake holders. Bake at 350 degrees F for 40-45 minutes.

    Makes 1 cake or 12 cupcakes. I doubled he recipe and make 12 – 75 gram cupcakes with an additional 1/8 cup of vegetables mixed in. Also added blueberries and chocolate bits. Since I double the recipe, my cupcakes are larger and made 14.

    I want to make a batch of pumpkin and another of zucchini, I prepared 4 cups of the dry ingredients.

  7. .

Post 343: August 25,2016 Thursday,8 to 9 p.m Speaker for Ladies and Girls no fee Great topic: Loving living in Israel and security issues and challenges in Shomron and Yehuda Speaker is the dynamic Natalie Sopinksy mother wife of five children life guard in Susya the regional pool for Yehuda region, lawyer and director in community matters for One Israel Fund – Listen to the details about families loving their excellent schools and loving Jewish neighbors learn about the terrorism and be a sympathetic Jew hearing about Jews all around Israel Be There! Where: Hakablan 41/18, Har Nof, Hostess: Chana Tova Sokol, call to say you can come so we can have enough refreshments. “Outrage” By Arlene Kushner, Outstanding Grocery list to help you buy produce, fresh, dried frozen in the United States – list of VEGAN BROCCOLI BURGERS Macrobiotic Recipes for the Sukkah Kenes for your delight

August 25, 2016, Thursday, 8 to 9 p.m.

Speaker for Ladies and Girls, no fee

Great topic: Loving living in Israel and security

issues and challenges in Shomron and Yehuda

Speaker is the dynamic Natalie Sopinksy, mother, wife of five children, life guard in Susya, the regional pool

for Yehuda region, lawyer and director in community matters for One Israel Fun Listen to the details about families loving their excellent schools and loving Jewish neighbors,

learn about the terrorism and be a sympathetic Jew hearing about Jews all around Israel

Be There! Where: Hakablan 41/18, Har Nof, Hostess: Chana Tova Sokol,  call to say you can come so we can have enough refreshments

Observant Jews are scrupulous about carrying out the mitzvot. Many of the laws relate to living in the “Land”. Looking over my shoulder, the theme of this blog post appears to be our connection to the laws, including but not limited to place and food.

wp-1471809497486.jpeg
one  page for kashrut labels seen in Israel.

The second group are seen on products often imported to Israel. I have a photo of the group on my phone. When I come across an unfamiliar hechshir I look it up on my flicker account.

I appreciate  Rabbi Rasskamm of Denver Colorado for his list of All food items –  for people who still cook.

He arranged the foods in a convenient order.

Aside from family and friends and of-course all the infinite number of distractions of NYC, I miss the many Korean fruit stalls in Flushing with the five varieties of cabbage.

Last time that I visited Silver Spring Maryland, the Chinese  tofu and  pasta, had  reliable Hechshirim on the packaging, so I guess, now 4 years later the trend has taken off with more variety available. That being the case in any community with Orthodox Jews and Orientals will have lots of choices.

We are a nation governed by laws. Hebron is our place, the greatest symbol of that relationship to law was established by our father Abraham’s purchase of plain and the cave and the burial of Sarah, Abraham and Jacob there (Gen.23 and elsewhere). Needless to say Jewish presence in Hebron, no matter how small, has  been a thorn in the side of the Arabs.

“Outrage”

By Arlene Kushner

I’m talking about steam-coming-out-of-my-ears outrage.

The subject is the allegedly ancient Arab village of Susiya.  The issue is Israel’s rights as a sovereign state operating under rules of law.

The background, briefly:

In the Hebron Hills of Judea there are the remains of an ancient Jewish city known as Susiya, which flourished in the Talmudic era. It is estimated that about 3,000 people – all Jews, observing a religious life – lived there at its height.  Archeological remains, including a synagogue, that have been excavated can be visited today.

Credit: Susiya Tourist Center
Still retained within the synagogue is an ancient mosaic floor:

Credit: mfa

Not far from this archeological site, there is a modern Jewish town of Susiya.

But within the area of the archeological remains there is also an Arab squatters’ village. It consists today of some 60+ constructions of concrete, tin and canvas.  They call this village Susiya as well.  And those squatting on the land claim that their village has been there for a very long time.

The facts tell a very different story:

There is no evidence of an old Arab village there.  Aerial photos indicate that with the exception of four building constructed in the 90s, there was nothing on the site until after 2000.  In fact, when the surveys conducted by the British mandatory powers in 1945 – which mention all of the villages in the area – are examined, no mention of a village named Susiya is found.

The site had been used seasonally by Bedouin shepherds, who found shelter in the caves in the region.  But in 1986, 277 dunams (about 68 acres) of land in the area, including this location, were declared to be an archeological site, at which time the caves were no longer available to the Bedouin.

Most of the buildings went up between 2011 and 2013 in defiance of a court order forbidding the building.

Now here it gets really interesting:

When the population registry of the Civil Administration was examined, it was found that most of the people claiming to live in Susiya had homes in the nearby town of Yatta (which is in Area A under PA jurisdiction).

How about that!  They move between their real homes in Yatta and the hovels in Susiya as it serves their political purpose – they come out when an entourage of left wing activists or a cadre of journalists (also most likely left wing) is due to visit.  When I was there, on a Regavim tour, the place was empty.

What we are in fact seeing here is a land grab by the Palestinian ArabNawajah family of Yatta, which has built illegally and in blatant violation of Israeli court orders.

Two facts must be emphasized.  One is that this matter has been thoroughly adjudicated.  That is, the courts – with due process and over a period of time – fully and fairly considered the issues.  The courts determined that the claims of the squatters were without basis, that they had been operating in contempt of court, and that the buildings that had been erected must be demolished.  This was not a determination arrived at lightly: the buildings had to come down.

And then, even though these were squatters without legal rights to the land, an offer was made to them regarding an allocation of land, in area C beyond the archeological site, near Yatta, to which they might move. But they refused and applied for legalization of their current site – which was rejected by the Court.  Aside from everything else, a village was not about to be legalized in a designated archeological area, which requires protection.

Further details can be seen here: http://regavim.org/susiya_facts/After multiple delays, the time now draws near for the demolition of many of the structures in illegal Arab Susiya.  It was last month that the Court ruled on this yet again.

But nothing is ever simple here in Israel, where the Western world seems to think it has a right to a say about everything we do.  This is the outrage: that others think they can tell a sovereign state that operates according to the rule of law what to do.  The interference is breathtakingly offensive.  We are forced to wonder if they would imagine interfering in the internal affairs of any other state in this fashion.

The eminent demolition of buildings in Arab Susiya has become a cause célèbre in left wing circles.  “Susiya 4ever!” they say, as if this is some noble cause.

Even a Senator – Dianne Feinstein – imagined she had a right to say something about what Israel was doing. And several NGOs have been involved.

Rabbis for Human Rights:  were they to recommend that the demolition be shelved, the Court would likely accept this – there would be no reason not to.Word is that Lieberman will tell the Court we must go ahead.

With all of the hullabaloo, the worst that has happened in recent days is that the State Department has weighed in. On July 16th, State Department spokesman John Kirby let it be known that the US was “closely following developments.”

We need them to monitor what we are doing?  There is a warning implicit in this.

At a press briefing he said (emphasis added):

We strongly urge the Israeli authorities to refrain from carrying out any demolitions in the village. Demolition of this Palestinian village or of parts of it, and evictions of Palestinians from their homes, would be harmful and provocative…”

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/198267

Provocative?? 

Elsewhere it has been reported that the US is putting great pressure on Israel with regard to this matter, and has indicated that if the demolition proceeds “the US response would be extremely severe.”

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/216223

I hope and trust that steam is now coming out of your ears as well.

It is imperative that the Israeli government stand strong in the face of this.  Otherwise our legal system is degraded and our state is demeaned. If the US finds it can push us around here, what comes next?<>And so I ask each of you to voice support to our leaders.

Long emails are counter-productive.  Our leaders and their aides are extremely busy. They do not need lectures or history lessons or legal instruction.  They don’t need to see your credentials or learn of your experiences. When they see this it is a turn-off and they probably don’t even read the message through.  What counts here is that they see a large number of brief supportive messages. A maximum of four sentences.

Tell them that you are furious about the pressure being applied by the US government with regard to the demolition of illegal buildings in Arab Susiya.  Tell them you are with them. Urge them to stand strong no matter what.

The most important person to reach is Defense Minister Lieberman.  The way to do this is via his aide, who will carry your message, here:ozer_sar@mod.gov.il (underscore between ozer and sar)  In the subject line: “A message for Minister Lieberman” or something similar.  If you just write to him, it would be great.

But then, if you wish, write as well to Prime Minister Netanyahu, delivering the same message. Use all of these addresses, which are all to the prime minister’s office:

davidkeyes@pmo.gov.il

Memshala@pmo.gov.il

pm_eng2@it.pmo.gov.il (underscore after pm)

If you want to send email messages, it should be done today.

VEGAN BROCCOLI BURGERS

Author: Lindsay Rey

Recipe type: sandwich

Cuisine: American

Serves: 4

INGREDIENTS

  • 1½ cups cooked/steamed broccoli (thoroughly drained and lightly packed into measuring cup)

  • 1 cup walnuts

  • 1 cup cooked brown rice

  • ¼ cup vital wheat gluten

  • 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast flakes

  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce

  • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder

  • Salt to taste

  • 2-3 tablespoons water (only if needed)

  • 2-4 tablespoons oil of your choice (for pan-frying patties)

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Steam/cook broccoli (fresh or frozen) in a saucepan on medium heat until broccoli is fork-tender.

  2. In a blender of food processor, pulse walnut pieces until they resemble a course meal, but have not yet become walnut butter. Place walnut pieces in a large mixing bowl.

  3. In a blender or food processor, pulse cooked/drained broccoli until it is crumbled into very tiny pieces, but not yet a puree.

  4. Please broccoli and remaining ingredients in mixing bowl with walnuts and rice. If your mixture seems dry and crumbly, go ahead and add a tablespoon of water. This stuff can turn into soggy goop pretty quickly, so you’ll want to be very careful to add only a scant tablespoon og water at a time to your burger mixture.

  5. Stir burger mix well, then shape into 4 equal burgers.

  6. Pour a tablespoon or 2 of oil (just enough to coat the pan) in a skillet and place on medium to medium-high heat.

  7. Gently pan-fry your burgers, allowing a few minutes for cooking on each side.

  8. You’ll know they are done when the burger surface has a nice dark brown crispness.

  9. Serve burgers warm on vegan buns with veggies and condiments of your choice (I chose a mix of Just Mayo, pickle relish, and ketchup.)

The product list below is extremely lengthy. Orthodox Jewish families, and kosher institutions have migrated to middle America and elsewhere in the world. Kosher processed food has followed them.

I remember the first Kosher Food festival was held in the Javitt’s Center. The number of purveyors required a larger space.

I feel that this list would be helpful for the “wise” consumer. If one lives close to a “Kosher” supermarket, there is a trade-off. One will pay more for equivalent quality items than perhaps is available cheaper for a “Box” store or chain supermarket  label or with national brands. Hence this list is for one living or traveling outside of Israel and would like to save money: However, on the other hand, one may choose to pay more to support companies that have their own Hashgagah arrangements. Company’s pay to develop consumer confidence and that cost is inevitably passed on to the consumer. 

List with some of my changes and additions from Rabbi Ysrael Rosskamm

Vaad Ha Kashrut, Denver, Colorado follows:

Products not requiring a Kosher Hechshir:

DISPOSABLE UTENSILS & FOOD WRAPS
Aluminum Foil – Does not require certification.
Aluminum Foil Pans – Does not require certification.
Foam Containers & Plates – Does not require certification.
Freezer Paper – Does not require certification.
Paper Plates – Does not require certification.
Parchment Paper – Quilon treated, requires reliable certification; silicon treated, does not require certification.
Plastic Flatware & Plates – Does not require certification.
Plastic Wrap & Bags – Does not require certification.
Waxed Paper – Does not require certification.

EGGS
Eggbeaters – Require reliable certification.
Eggs, non-processed – does not require certification. They should be checked to ensure that they do not contain blood spots.

Fresh Fish – Whole fish and fish steaks should, preferably, be purchased from a store which has reliable rabbinical supervision. This is because non-kosher stores in America that sell fish commonly use one knife to cut different species, kosher and non-kosher alike. Therefore, residue from the slicing of non-kosher fish may remain on the blade of the knife and, subsequently, be rubbed onto the cutting site of the kosher fish.
However, one may buy whole fish or fish steaks, even if it is gutted, from any store, provided the following conditions are met:
1. One did not actually see the kosher fish soaking amidst non-kosher fish.
2. Some scales are still on the fish.
3. Prior to cooking the fish, one should take a straight edged knife and, using only minimal pressure, scrape off the area where the store knife would have cut. This would wipe off any residue from the blade that cut the non-kosher fish. After this, thoroughly wash the fish.
Gefilte Fish – Requires reliable certification.
Ground Fish – Requires reliable certification.
Imitation Crabmeat – Requires reliable certification.
Lox – Requires reliable certification.
Smoked Fish – Requires reliable certification.
The following is a partial list of kosher and non-kosher species of fish: Note: In order to verify that a fish is kosher, one MUST see that it has removable scales, you can not rely on the fact its name is listed on the kosher list.
Kosher Fish
Albacore
Bass
Buffalo Fish
Carp
Char Cod
Flounder
Goldfish
Grouper
Haddock
Halibut
Herring
Mackerel
Mahi Mahi
Blue Marlin
Orange
Roughee
Perch
Pike
Pollock
Salmon
Sardines
Snapper
Sole
Suckers
Trout
Tuna
Walleye
Whitefish
Whiting
Non Kosher Fish
CATFISH
EELS
GRAYFISH
SHARK
SNAKE MACKERELS
PUFFER
STURGEONS
SWORDFISH

FRUIT: Applies outside of Israel. Any fruit vegetable and grain grown in Israel, dried fresh or canned requires proper Israeli Hechshir.
Canned or plastic cups (non aseptic)

Canned fruits not from China and Israel do not require kosher certification if they only contain one or more of the following ingredients: Ascorbic acid, citric acid, corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup, salt, sugar, water. Note: Other ingredients may require kosher certification.
Applesauce, pure – Without questionable ingredients.
Berries – Raspberries and blackberries are not recommended; other varieties, without questionable ingredients.
Cherries – Pitted or sweet, without questionable ingredients; maraschino cherries, require reliable certification.
Figs – Without questionable ingredients.
Fruit Cocktail – Without questionable ingredients, provided that you remove the cherries.
Guava – Does not require certification.
Mandarin Oranges (not from China) – Without questionable ingredients.
Mango – Does not require certification.
Peaches – Without questionable ingredients.
Pears – Without questionable ingredients.
Pineapples – Without questionable ingredients.
Plums – Without questionable ingredients.
Dried Fruit
Dried fruit, except for dried bananas, does not require certification. Freeze-dried, requires reliable certification.
Dried bananas – Require reliable certification.
Dried prunes – Do not require certification.

Fresh Only grown outside of Israel. Methods of checking are the same.
Fresh fruits do not require certification. Again All fresh fruits in Israel require certification. However, some varieties require a thorough inspection prior to cooking and eating to ensure that they are free of insects. All varieties should be inspected to ensure that they do not have a worm hole, which may indicate the presence of a worm inside. A guide for preparing fruits and vegetables is available at http://scrollk.org/PrepFrtVeg.html.
Berries – Blackberries and red raspberries are not recommended, due to infestation, unless they are pureed; blueberries may be used after being soaked in soapy water for a few minutes and rinsed; strawberries may be used after cutting the top off, soak the strawberries in soapy water for 5 minutes and agitate the strawberries in the soapy water before rinsing THOROUGHLY under running water.
Nuts – Oil roasted, require reliable certification; raw and dry roasted do not require certification.
Raisins – Domestic without oil, does not require certification.
Frozen
Frozen insect-free varieties, without additives, are acceptable without certification.

HEALTH FOODS-List pertains to outside of Israel-checking methods required in all cases described. In Israel ALL below require Certification. If processed in America certification by a reputable Kashrut Authority required with the exception of Agar Agar and others on the list.

I’ve only seen Agar Agar with a circke K symbol on it in Israel.

Every form of loose health food item grown in Israel must have certification in Israel. Don’t be confused as the list is for American consumers.

Continue reading Post 343: August 25,2016 Thursday,8 to 9 p.m Speaker for Ladies and Girls no fee Great topic: Loving living in Israel and security issues and challenges in Shomron and Yehuda Speaker is the dynamic Natalie Sopinksy mother wife of five children life guard in Susya the regional pool for Yehuda region, lawyer and director in community matters for One Israel Fund – Listen to the details about families loving their excellent schools and loving Jewish neighbors learn about the terrorism and be a sympathetic Jew hearing about Jews all around Israel Be There! Where: Hakablan 41/18, Har Nof, Hostess: Chana Tova Sokol, call to say you can come so we can have enough refreshments. “Outrage” By Arlene Kushner, Outstanding Grocery list to help you buy produce, fresh, dried frozen in the United States – list of VEGAN BROCCOLI BURGERS Macrobiotic Recipes for the Sukkah Kenes for your delight

Post 294::Benefits of rope jumping and details of a class offered for the beginner. CLEANTECH 2016 April 4-5 The Jerusalem Business Networking Forum (JBNF) Monday, April 4, 2016 8:30 AM Ramada Hotel Ruppin Bridge at Herzl Blvd, Jerusalem, 91033, Israel Jerusalem to register: https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#search/The+Jerusalem+Business+Networking+Forum+(JBNF)++Monday%2C+April+4%2C+2016+8%3A30+AM++Ramada+Hotel+Ruppin+Bridge+at+Herzl+Blvd%2C+Jerusalem%2C+91033%2C+Israel+Jerusalem/153c124b5f4f4ff7 ‘JEWISH PEACE CORPS’ VOLUNTEERS TO DISTRESSED COMMUNITIES Jewish Agency Sending ‘Jewish Peace Corps’ Volunteers to Distressed Communities, Fundraising Fashion Show Tuesday April 5th 4-6PM Inbal Hotel to benefit Hadassah Department of Neonatology levinson.phyllis@gmail.com Passover recipes: Fennel and Kohlrabi Salad, Salmon Kabobs

There’s a thread running thru this post. Passover is the holiday of Tshuvah and beginning with Rosh Chodesh Nissan we see events in the Jerusalem area related to living “Green”, exercise, and volunteering. We are fortunate no not need to ask others to help prepare a festive holiday. 

CLEANTECH 2016 April 4-5

The Jerusalem Business Networking Forum (JBNF)

Monday, April 4, 2016
8:30 AM

Ramada Hotel
Ruppin Bridge at Herzl Blvd, Jerusalem, 91033, Israel
Jerusalem

to register: https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#search/The+Jerusalem+Business+Networking+Forum+(JBNF)++Monday%2C+April+4%2C+2016+8%3A30+AM++Ramada+Hotel+Ruppin+Bridge+at+Herzl+Blvd%2C+Jerusalem%2C+91033%2C+Israel+Jerusalem/153c124b5f4f4ff7

My building’s roof is a place where I reflect on the special privilege it is to live in Jerusalem. When I want to exercise I use one of several Heavy Jump Rope- Choose From 5 Sizesweighted ropes. Not on the roof, across the street on a wooden area outside Ha Ma”Alot restaurant or on a cushiony surface in Gan Ha Atzmaot.

I have been using jump ropes over several years, starting with the one lb. and increasing now to five lbs. It is my belief that exercise is the key to permanent weight maintenance for women as they age. 

Would my readers be interested in joining me in a class in rope jumping in the park?I would supply the ropes starting with the lightest. My proceeds would be going to tzaduka. 

Jumping rope is a traditional exercise that provides a total body strength and conditioning workout. With the ability to burn up to 1,000 calories per hour, you can use the jump rope to improve strength, agility, coordination or endurance.

A common question about the effectiveness of jumping rope, however, is the selection of the jump rope and choosing between a weighted jump rope or a speed rope.

Benefits :

A weighted jump rope and speed rope both provide the same basic benefits, which include improved coordination, agility, footwork, quickness and endurance. Using a speed rope, however, focuses on speed and quickness and is better for developing coordination and conditioning by increasing the speed of the rope. Weighted jump ropes, on the other hand, burn a significant amount of calories and can be effective for increasing strength and promoting weight loss.

Beginners:

Beginners should start with a basic lightweight speed rope before progressing to a weighted jump rope, according to Ross Enamait, professional fitness trainer. The durable plastic jump rope allows you to perform basic jump rope exercises and workouts to develop speed, agility and endurance. Also, the speed ropes are better at developing overall fitness and conditioning to complement a wide range of workout and training programs.

Speed:

A speed rope is ideal for beginners but can be used by elite athletes to develop footwork, coordination and conditioning. For example, boxers use a speed rope during their general strength and conditioning workouts. After learning the basic techniques for using the speed rope, you can progress to advanced exercises such as double unders. Double unders are a jump rope pattern that includes making two revolutions with the rope for every one jump and requires a significant amount of speed, coordination and endurance.

Strength:

Use a weighted jump rope if your fitness goals revolve around strength or weight loss. The heavy ropes require upper body strength to continue spinning the rope for repeated jumps. You can choose from 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6 lb. weights to match your individual fitness and strength levels. Use the weighted jump rope to complement your normal strength training workouts.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/434651-weighted-jump-rope-vs-speed-rope/

 

CLEANTECH 2016 April 4-5

The Jerusalem Business Networking Forum (JBNF)

Monday, April 4, 2016
8:30 AM

Ramada Hotel
Ruppin Bridge at Herzl Blvd, Jerusalem, 91033, Israel
Jerusalem

to register: https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#search/The+Jerusalem+Business+Networking+Forum+(JBNF)++Monday%2C+April+4%2C+2016+8%3A30+AM++Ramada+Hotel+Ruppin+Bridge+at+Herzl+Blvd%2C+Jerusalem%2C+91033%2C+Israel+Jerusalem/153c124b5f4f4ff7

 ‘JEWISH PEACE CORPS’ VOLUNTEERS TO DISTRESSED COMMUNITIES

Jewish Agency Sending ‘Jewish Peace Corps’ Volunteers to Distressed Communities.

1,000 Young People to Serve Communities in South Africa, Ghana, Ethiopia, Mexico, Peru, and Israel

JEWISH BUSINESS NEWS

The Jewish Agency for Israel has started recruiting young people from Israel and around the world to volunteer in distressed communities in Africa, South America, and Israel, as part of the organization’s Project TEN program.

A launch event was hosted by Israeli Consul General in New York Ido Aharoni and was attended by dozens of Jewish community leaders, diplomats, philanthropists, Jewish Agency representatives, and former participants in the program.

In recent weeks, hundreds of students at top American universities have participated in on-campus information sessions hosted by Project TEN in order to familiarize them with volunteer opportunities at the three international centers currently operating in Winneba, Ghana; Gondar, Ethiopia; and Oaxaca, Mexico.

The volunteers may also choose to serve at the two Israeli centers in the southern city of Arad and Kibbutz Harduf in northern Israel, where they will run programs to empower Bedouin youth, new immigrants, at-risk teens, and individuals with special needs.

Project TEN was created by The Jewish Agency three years ago and offers young people from Israel and around the world the opportunity to live together in distressed communities and realize the Jewish values of tzedakah (social justice) and tikkun olam (repairing the world) by helping empower local residents.
Each participant receives a tailor-made volunteer program of several weeks or months in length, depending on their availability and preferences. Together, participants volunteer in educational, agricultural, and health-related initiatives, working together with local organizations and Jewish groups active in the area.

The ultimate goal is to develop local residents’ leadership skills and empower them to create models for sustainable development well after the volunteers return to their home countries.

The volunteers themselves return to their communities with a greater drive to engage in local activism and become involved in Jewish life.

In Ghana, Project TEN volunteers serve in the fishing town of Winneba, where they work with local residents and the fishermen’s children.

They run an educational center in which local children receive enrichment classes in a range of subjects and a mobile computer lab that provides digital knowledge to students whose prior exposure to computers was limited to sketches of keyboards on paper.

The volunteers also work in the fishing village of Akosua, which maintains some of the world’s most ancient fishing practices, teaching local children in a coconut hut.

In Mexico, volunteers serve in Oaxaca, where a series of natural disasters have prompted the creation of a Project TEN center to help local residents improve their preparedness and raise their standard of living.

The center is run in partnership with the Mexican Jewish organization CADENA, which specializes in serving communities struck by national disasters.

The volunteers work in dozens of far-flung, isolated communities spread across the vast, mountainous region.

Project TEN Director Yarden Zornberg notes that two additional volunteer centers are set to open in the coming year.

One will be hosted by the Jewish community of Durban, South Africa, where volunteers will work with local tribespeople, and the other will be located in Cusco, Peru, offering backpackers the opportunity to combine their treks with volunteerism.

According to Zornberg, more than one thousand volunteers are expected to serve in all seven Project TEN centers, engaging in activism over extended periods and realizing core Jewish values in the process.
Chairman of the Executive of The Jewish Agency for Israel Natan Sharansky said: “Through Project TEN, The Jewish Agency is creating a real opportunity for young Jewish people who want to be part of something bigger than themselves – to better their world through common work with young people like themselves from Israel and around the world. In so doing, Project TEN connects these young people’s vision of a better future with their Jewish roots. Making this wonderful initiative happen is yet another way for us to concretize Jewish and Zionist values.”

COST

The cost for the three-month Project TEN program outside of Israel, including volunteer, social, and learning activities; transportation between the center and your volunteer placement; trips and excursions; Internet connection; and subsidized food and lodging, is around $12 per day, or $1080 for the entire three-month period (Summer programs cost $1000 for a two-month track).

The cost for the five-month Project TEN program at its Israeli centers, including volunteer, social, and learning activities; transportation between the center and your volunteer placement; trips and excursions; Internet connection; and subsidized food and lodging, is $1,300 for the entire five-month period with a full Masa scholarship OR $1,500 for the entire five-month period with a partial or no Masa scholarship (scroll down to learn if you are eligible for a Masa scholarship).

The cost for shorter tracks in all Project TEN centers cost $24 per day per participante (in additional to group charges). These tracks are unique, and are open to special groups. Please contact> daniel.a@tenprogram.org for more details.

The cost does not include your airfare to the target country, health insurance, visa fees, or vaccination. Registration payment of $100 is required. The balance will be paid in two equal payments.

The UJA Federation of New York and Project TEN have established a Pay it Forward Fund that will provide some assistance to those volunteers who find it hard to pay for all of their expenses.

Each and every candidate will be required to participate in his or her own costs to some extent, and the scholarships will fund only up to 50% of the entire costs.

The UJA New York | TEN fund is based on a “pay it forward” model in which recipients are asked to sign an honor code, pledging to return the full amount within 2-3 years.  This arrangement will not be legally binding, but will be actively encouraged, and will help other participants, in turn, to volunteer where they are needed.

Please contact ten@jafi.org for more details. Each application will be reviewed by a committee, and the applicant will receive a reply within two weeks from the receipt of the application.

Volunteering in Arad or Kibbutz Harduf, Israel?

masaMasa Israel Journey works to make it as easy as possible for young adults to go to Israel. They offer grants and scholarships to help make the experience more affordable. All Masa Israel participants are eligible to apply for universal grants and need-based scholarships towards the cost of your program.The grant/scholarship will be deducted from the total cost of the program. The amount available depends country of origin, age, and the length of your program.

Masa Israel Journey is funded jointly by The Jewish Agency for Israel and by the Government of Israel.

Grilled Salmon Kebabs

I mixed tuna and salmon
 

Prep time

15 mins

Cook time

10 mins

Total time

25 mins

Author: Maya Kitchenette

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 600g salmon filet without skin/tuna

  • 1 cup pineapples – cut into 2 cm chunks

  • 1 green pepper – large cubes

Ingredients For The Marinade

  • ¼ cup soy sauce/ or less

  • ¼ cup honey/orange juice

  • 1 tbsp olive oil

  • 1 tsp lemon zest

  • 1 tbsp lemon juice

  • 1 tsp minced garlic

  • 1 tsp minced ginger

  • ¼ tsp freshly cracked black pepper

  • 1 fat pinch of mixed herbs

Ingredients For The Dip

  • ½ cup sour cream or mayonnaise (see notes)

  • ¼ tsp red pepper flakes

  • 1 garlic – grated

  • 1 tsp lemon zest

  • 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice

  • salt and black pepper to taste

Instructions

For The Kebabs

  1. Slice salmon into chunks.

  2. Mix all the ingredients for the marinade in a bowl and whisk together till well incorporated.

  3. Pour ¾ of the marinade over the salmon chunks and marinate for 15 minutes.

  4. Marinate the pineapple and peppers with the remaining marinade for 15 minutes.

  5. Preheat the grill for medium-high heat.

  6. Thread peppers, salmon and pineapple onto skewers.

  7. Brush with oil and grill for 5 minutes on each side.

For The Dip

  1. Mix all the ingredients in a bowl and keep it in the fridge till ready to use

  2. Fennel and Kohlrabi Salad

     

    A simple julienned fennel and kohlrabi salad recipe with red onion, parsley, and a lemony dressing.

  3. Author: Brooklyn Supper, (adapted from The Frankies Spuntino Kitchen Companion & Cooking Manual by Franks Castronovo and Falcinelli)

  4. Recipe type: Salad

    Makes: two to four

    Ingredients

    • 1 small bulb fennel, well-cleaned and trimmed

    • 1 small, tender kohlrabi, peeled and trimmed

    • 1/2 red onion sliced thin into half-moons

    • 1 cup minced flat leaf parsley

    • zest of 1 lemon

    • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

    • 2 tablespoons lemon juice

    • salt and pepper to taste

    • pinch of red pepper flakes

    • fennel leaves

    Instructions

    1. Julienne the fennel and kohlrabi. Toss with the red onion and parsley. Combine the olive oil and and lemon juice, drizzle on the dressing, and add a few pinches of salt and tons of pepper. Taste, adjust salt and acid levels. Plate and give each serving a good squeeze of lemon juice, a pinch of red pepper flakes, and garnish with parsley and fennel leaves.

    2. Plant sale in Kiryat Yovel, Meir Grunwald Street. All plants are from a container garden, kale, chard, oregano, mint, sage, thyme, dill and tomato plants. Each container is 2.50 NIS. Pick-up on Sunday or Monday of this week. Please contact Shoshana Dale if you are interested

    3. shoshanahdale@gmail.com

      Fundraising Fashion Show Tuesday April 5th $-6PM Inbal Hotel to benefit Hadassah Department of Neonatology levinson.phyllis@gmail.com

      A FASHION SHOW & FANCY TEA 180 sh
      To Be Presented By
      The TAMAR & NACHAMA CHAPTERS
      OF HADASSAH-ISRAEL
      Tuesday April 5th, 2016 4pm-6pm
      At the INBAL Hotel
      OSFA Boutique’s fashions
      OSFA-meaning “her collection” is a unique boutique on Derech Beit Lechem 53 in Jerusalem.  Inspirational and friendly atmosphere, cutting edge Israeli designers synthesized with fabulous European imports and moderate prices.
      There will be a raffle with over 20 wonderful prizes
      for NIS 20 per ticket.
      Price of Fashion Show: NIS 180.00
      For reservations please contact:
      Phyllis Levinson
      Pyllis.levinson@icloud.com or 02-642-1953

 

Post 276: Israeli Senior Citizen Card, sign up with an e-mail. Jerusalem Card is Free for Seniors starting February 2016, Khan Theate’s in house café-bar hosts nightly live shows and jam sessions, with a focus on giving exposure to the next generation of local musicians – all performances are free of charge. Information Relating to the number of updates in your location Mircaz Ha”Ir:

I have found that nothing happens “automatically ” in Israel with the exception of Arnona (real Estate Tax) and health insurance tax. Those bills are sent by mail and best not to ignore them.

The Israeli Senior Citizen Card, Kartis Ezrach Vatik is another story. It is available thru their website to women over the age of 62 and men over the age of 67. This card provides a variety of discounts and benefits on public transportation, attractions, and several other services.

I don’t understand WHY such a card has a use since one’s birthdate is clearly visible on the Teudat Zehut.

New Olim, wherever they reside in Israel, can receive their Kartis Ezrach Vatik by contacting the Department of Services to the Elderly (Sherut LeMa’an HaZaken) in Jerusalem at: 02- 654-7025 or emailing ezrach.vatik@pmo.gov.il. You may also send a fax with your request to 02-654-7049

Include the information below in your request:

  • Your name as it appears on your Teudat Zehut (Identity card)
  • Your telephone numbers (landline and cell phone)
  • Home Address
  • Copy of your Teudat Zehut

Expect a 1-2 month waiting period before receiving the card in the mail.

The Yeruhalami Card is similarly available to seniors. according to the age requirements as stated above. 

https://www1.jerusalem.muni.il/jer_sys/forms/CreateForm.aspx?idsysform=%20227 (form in Hebrew).

Call center and issuance 1-700-53-00-02 | Sundays, B, D, E at 09:00 to 13:30 Tuesdays at 09:00 to 13:30, 16:00 to 6:00 p.m. | Safra Square. This by-phone works as I just called. I was told that I would automatically receive the card last February.

However, nothing is automatic.

I refer you to common questions regarding the card for seniors. I was told upon my last visit to the Yerushalaymi Card office that I would automatically get a card in February, since the card is free starting February 1, 2016.

Didn’t happen.

I will try  to clarify, (B”H) tomorrow. The office number is 1-700-53-00-02. Common questions follow:


כיצד ניתן להנפיק את הכרטיס?
הנפקת כרטיס התושב מתבצעת בעמדת הרישום הפועלת בבניין העירייה (בנין 1 בקומה 1 במודיעין ובקומה 3)
ו/או במוקדים נוספים שיפורסמו מעת לעת ע”י העירייה.
שעות פעילות המוקד: ימים: א’, ב’, ד’, ה’, בין השעות 15:00-9:00 | יום ג’, בין השעות 14:00-9:00, 18:00-15:00
שעות מענה טלפוני: ימים: א’, ב’, ד’, ה’, בין השעות 13:30-9:00 | יום ג’, בין השעות 13:30-9:00, 18:00-16:00
מעבר לשעות המענה ניתן להשאיר הודעה וצוות ירושלמי יחזור אליכם.
בנוסף ניתן להנפיק את כרטיס התושב באמצעות הדואר או ע”י מילוי טופס מקוון וחיוב באמצעות אשראי טלפוני. לפרטים וטופסי ההנפקה.
 במידה ואבד הכרטיס מה עליי לעשות?
במקרה כזה יש לפנות לעמדת הרישום עם תעודת זהות ולבקש הנפקה חוזרת של כרטיס התושב, בגין הנפקה מחודשת תחויב בדמי הנפקה של הכרטיס החדש.
.My problem was a lost cardאני בעל עסק בעיר ומעוניין להצטרף לסל ההטבות של כרטיס תושב ”ירושלמי”. מה עליי לעשות?
עיריית ירושלים מעודדת הצטרפות בתי עסק ומוסדות במגוון רחב של תחומים אל נותני ההטבות, באמצעות פרסום נרחב של ההטבה ופרטי העסק באמצעי התקשורת השונים וביניהם: חוברת הטבות, מודעות בעיתונות, שילוט חוצות, מגזין מקוון (ניוזלטר), אינטרנט ועוד. כמו כן מספקת העירייה מדבקה המעידה על עסקים המכבדים את כרטיס ”ירושלמי”.
לבקשת הצטרפות אנא מלא את הטופס המצורףהטופס המצורף ונציגנו יחזור אליך.האם עליי לבקש את ההטבה?
נותן ההטבה מחויב להעניק את ההנחה, למציג הכרטיס, במעמד התשלום בהתאם להנחה שפורסמה. לנוחיותך, אתרינו מכיל מידע עדכני אודות ההטבות והיקפן. במידה ולא הוענקה ההטבה בהתאם לפרסום, ניתן לפנות למוקד השירות בטלפון: 1700-53-00-02 או באמצעות פנייה לדוא”ל:yerushalmi@jerusalem.muni.ilהאם ניתן לקבל עדכונים שוטפים על ההטבות?
המגזין המקוון של עיריית ירושלים נשלח אחת לחודש עם עדכונים חמים על הנחות והטבות למחזיקי כרטיס תושב. קליק ואתם בעניינים! להצטרפות והרשמה למגזין המקוון.
אתר ירושלמי מתעדכן באופן יומיומי בהטבות השונות.
חוברת שנתית המאגדת את מגוון ההטבות של ירושלמי נשלחת בדיוור ישיר לחברי המועדון ומחולקת במוקדי ההנפקה.
הטבות חדשות ואירועים מיוחדים מתפרסמים מעת לעת באמצעי התקשורת השונים העומדים לרשות עיריית ירושלים (עיתונות, עלונים, שילוט חוצות ועוד.)

מהם אמצעי התשלום לרכישת הכרטיס?
במוקד השירות וההנפקה בכיכר ספרא 1 קומה 3 ניתן לרכוש את הכרטיס במזומן או בכרטיס אשראי בלבד.
ניתן להנפיק כרטיס באמצעות טופס מקוון ונציגנו יחזור אליך בטלפון לצורך גביית תשלום בכרטיס אשראי.

 

Recipes offered with Blessings For Good Health!

Victoria Barayev
http://www.victoriabarayev.com
from Rav Yichezkel Askhaeck “Healthy Life by The Torah”. Victoria also Consulted with Rav Isroel Zelman.

Ideas For Healthy Mishloach Manot

Recipes:

Super Healthy Hamentaschen

Ingredients:

1 cup chia seeds, ground in a coffee grinder.

The one in the photo is ubiquitous in Israel. 

The grinder does a superb job-Gold-line ATL 242

1 cup cashews

1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats

½ cup oat bran

½ tsp cinnamon

¼ tsp sea salt

1.5 cup or 2 avocados

½ cup maple or brown rice syrup

1 tsp vanilla

Your favorite jam or

2 cups Turkish apricots

Zest of ½ lemon

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350F.

Soak Turkish apricots in hot water for 15 min. Drain. Blend in a food processor with lemon zest until smooth. Transfer to a bowl. Wash and dry the food processor.

Place chia seeds, cashews, oats, oat bran, cinnamon and sea salt into the food processor and grind until well processed. Remove into a bowl. I find it easier to grind the seeds first.

In the same food processor, mix avocados, syrup, and vanilla until well blended. Add to the bowl with dry ingredients.

Mix all ingredients to form medium-soft pliable dough.

Separate into pieces the size of a golf ball. I weigh out 40-50 grams with your hands or with rolling pin, make circles ¼ inch thick. Place baking paper under pin if you find that the dough doesn’t roll out.

Using a floured spatula lift the circles and place them on parchment paper lined baking sheets.

Spoon 1 heaping teaspoon of filling into the center of each circle. Fold over the edges to form three corners.

Bake 20-25 min.

Sweet Crunchy Balls

1 1/4 cups rolled oats
3/4 cups dried apricots
3/4 cups dried currants
1/2 cup sunflower seed butter
2 tsp almond extract
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
toasted sesame seeds

Pulse all ingredients in a food processor. Make small balls and roll them in sesame seeds. Easy,delicious, and filling! Great idea for the school snacks!

Apricot-Lemon Oatmeal Bars

(from Creative Kitchen Alchemy)

2  rolled oats

1 cup chopped nuts (a mix of almonds and walnuts)

1/2 cup fine cornmeal or corn flour

1/2 cup millet flour

1/2 cup unsweetened coconut flakes

Pinch of cinnamon

Pinch of sea salt

1 1/2 cups dried Turkish apricots

Boiling water

1 jar of lemon spread or any other jam of your choice

1/2 cup brown rice syrup

1/2 cup corn or olive oil

1/2 cup spring water

Preheat your oven to 350F/190C.

Soak dried apricots in boiling water for 20 minutes. Then process in a food processor.

Place the first 7 ingredients in a large bowl and mix together.

In a small saucepan, heat rice syrup, oil, and water until all are mixed well. No need to boil.

Add warm liquid to the dry ingredients and mix well with a fork.

Place 1/3 of the mixture into an 8×8 baking dish. Make sure to cover the bottom of the dish.Pack it down with wet hands into a firm layer.

Evenly spread the apricot mix on top.

Spread another 1/3 of the oatmeal mixture on top of the apricots, gently and lightly pressing down.

Cover the second layer of the oatmeal mixture with the lemon preserve.

Crumble the rest of the oatmeal mixture on top of the lemon preserve to fully cover it.

Bake for 30 minutes.

Cut into squares. This delicious treat can be enjoyed warm or cold.

Recipes for Pesach:
Delightful Vegetable Soup – Very easy to cook; this soup is very light, satisfying, and delicate to taste.

6 cups of water

medium onion, cut in 4 quarters

1 turnip, cut in quarters

2 stalks celery, cut in 1-inch long pieces

tomato, cut in quarters

1 medium or large carrot, cut in 1-inch long chunks

1 medium potato, peeled and cut in quarters

1small green or red pepper, cut in quarters

1 tsp cumin seeds

Tbsp. of olive oil

2 bay leaves

A handful of dill, cut in 2-inch long pieces.

Bring water to a boil in a soup pot. Add all vegetables to the pot at once along with cumin, sea salt, olive oil, and bay leaves. Cover and bring to a boil, lower the flame and simmer for 15-20 min. Add dill and serve.

Great served with matza.

 Quinoa Pilaf

 4 cups quinoa

6 cups of cold water

1/3 cup olive or sesame oil

1 medium onion, diced

2 cups mushrooms, diced

2 carrots, diced

2 stalks celery, diced

4 cloves garlic, diced

1 tsp. sea salt

1/2 tsp. turmeric

1 tsp. cumin seed

Black pepper to taste

Rinse quinoa 3-4 times in a fine strainer to remove bitter coating. Drain well, then, sauté drained quinoa in some of the olive oil until toasty brown. In a medium pot combine quinoa in about 6 cups of cold water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 20 minutes. Drain well again. Sauté vegetables in the remaining oil with sea salt, cumin seed, turmeric and black pepper. Add cooked quinoa, mix well, cover and let heat through for a few minutes. Serve hot and enjoy!

Easy Cashew Matzo Napoleon

4 cups raw cashews, soaked for 2 hours and drained

1/2 to 1 cup water, for the desired thickness

Zest of 1 lemon

4-8 Tbsp maple syrup

1/8 tsp sea sal

t6 square sheets of matzo, lightly wet

Place all ingredients in a food processor and run until smooth and creamy. It is good to add water gradually to achieve the desired consistency. Cashew cream should not be thin and runny. Place a sheet of matzo on a serving plate. Generously spread cashew cream on it. Top with another sheet of matzo. Repeat the steps until all matzo is used. Sprinkle the top layer of cream with ground walnuts. Refrigerate the cake for at least 2 hours.  Optional: Spread melted chocolate on top of the cake

Blessings For Good Health!
Stay tuned for upcoming events!

Victoria Barayev
http://www.victoriabarayev.com.

Finally, some informal options for nights out.

Khanal’e, the Khan Theater’s in house café-bar, hosts nightly live shows and jam sessions, with a focus on giving exposure to the next generation of local musicians – all performances are free of charge!

*Hip downtown restaurant-bar Nocturno has a Wednesday night live music series – entrance is just 30 NIS with discounted alcohol available at the bar.

 

I thought as a final addition you might enjoy the complex issues that are sent to member of my community regarding monies spent in the coming year; and several links are provided to help you to transform your breakfast.

Letter from our City Council Representative Offir Lang follows. I did send an e-mail to the administration’s urban planner, Ms. Sivan, who is the administrator for transportation. My e-mail detailed the horrendous sidewalk vehicular parking on Shabat on our block, which prevents pedestrian movement. Stay tune for a response.

Dear residents,

Relating to the number of updates your location:

  1. Approval of a Community Administration in 2016

Community Administration evening Driktorion heart of the city unanimously approved the 2016 budget.

The budget for this year includes a significant change aspects relating to the strengthening of the residents of the city center, with an emphasis on comprehensive community work and community projects to strengthen the heart of the city and residents of neighborhoods mode. In addition, the budget includes an increase in different services, the Administration provides early childhood, the elderly, the young and the like. I would like to thank all partners in formulating the budget – Director Mr. Vicky HARLAP, chairman of the Finance Committee, Mr. David Ansbacher, members of the Finance Committee and the Board Administration.

  1. Handling parking shortage in the heart of the city

Further summarize things we had recently with the representatives of the Jerusalem municipality facilities, in the coming weeks more parking spaces will be trained blue and white in favor of a regional character ranging from hours, starting the afternoon in the heart of the city. Training will be the number of parking spaces at a time in the beating of another. I would like to thank all the partners in promoting the issue – Head of Parking, Central District Administration and chairman of the physicality of the Community Council.

Also, our request to convene soon and transportation committee of the Jerusalem municipality, discuss the plight of parking spaces and traffic arrangements in the city center, with the participation of members of the Committee and relevant senior representatives from the Jerusalem municipality. Details later on.

  1. A conference on the plan 38

Directorate of Urban Renewal and Community Administration Centrum cordially invite you to a conference on Plan No. 38 on Sunday 10/01/2015 at 20:00 Lev Ha’ir Community Council, St. Ohel Moshe Nahlaot42. For further information, please contact the administration’s urban planner, Ms. Sivan a muscle Cohen. Email: Sivansharirc@gmail.com

  1. Treatment hazards and nuisances

As a reminder, the Environment Committee of the Jerusalem Municipality stated that in the near future there will be supervision and monitoring treatment center received 106 complaints related noise from businesses and / or noise in urban or private events and / or stench and pollution from smokestacks business. At the end of the study period, a comprehensive report will be provided by professional bodies to the Commission regarding the hazards and nuisances treatment received at the center. In light of the Committee’s decision, I ask that anyone who has any nuisance to the above issues call center hotline 106 and 100 and record numbers turn!

At the same time, we continue to work with the various bodies authorities to promote effective change in procedures for dealing with nuisances and nuisances caused to residents and merchants, while preparing a comprehensive community work of the administration neighborhoods. Also, after preparing a centralized list of problems and tours of the area, updated because some of the problems have been addressed and receive treatment from the authorities, but the road is still long. Information below.

  1. Education

We welcome the inclusion of all parties involved in education Neighborhood Forum for Education and Community Administration held a communal heart of the city, including representatives of schools, kindergartens and frameworks for early childhood, youth, parent committees and more. Forum condemned the challenges neighborhood, ideas for cooperation and pooling of resources. For further information, please contact the Youth Hub Administration, Ms. Adi lion. Mail: Noar.lev@gmail.com

God. Thank you to all the residents and merchants, who participated in this week’s physical committee in cooperation with the city center and the administrative committee of community cultural heart of the city.

If you are interested to take part in committees of communal heart of the city administration and affect your environment, you are welcome to see our straw:

Physical committee chairman of the city center, Mr. Joseph Markowitz. Email: Ymcityjer@gmail.com

Committee Chairman physical Nahlaot, Mr. Joseph was connected to. Email: Yza@bezeqint.net

Chairman of the Committee on the elderly, Ms. Abigail see me there. Mile gigit@inter.net.il

Committee chairman company culture and leisure, Dr. Ofir Lang. Mail: Ofir.lang@mail.huji.ac.il

Education Committee Chairman, Mr. Yanai Kranzler. Email: Ykranzler@gmail.com

Chairman of the Jewish Quarter Extension, Ms. Rose Lamb and white. Email: Selavan@netvision.net.il

Please contact us with any issue,

Dr. Ofir Lang

Community Authority Chairman Lev

From Drs. Oz and Roizen:

When legendary college basketball coach Dean Smith transformed the traditional fast break into the lightning-fast “Carolina Break”, the University of North Carolina started winning and Smith ended up with a record-breaking career win/loss record of 879-254.
If you’re looking for a major transformation — losing weight and getting healthier — you want to change your break-fast so you become a winner too. How? A 12-week study of overweight and obese women found those who ate a big breakfast https://www.sharecare.com/health/weight-loss/article/flatten-a-big-belly-eat-these-two-healthy-diet-foods-for-breakfast, mid-sized lunch and small dinner lost over twice as much weight as women who took in the same calories, but in reverse order! Breakfast firsters also reduced waist circumference, lowered blood glucose, insulin resistance, and levels of ghrelin, the hunger hormone.
Why does this work ?https://www.sharecare.com/health/eating-habits-nutrition/why-is-breakfast-so-important?myAttribute=yay? While science doesn’t have all the answers yet, here are some possible explanations: Eat more calories than you burn, fat is stored. Burn more calories than you take in — weight loss! Since you burn more calories when you’re awake than when you’re asleep, doesn’t it make sense to eat most of your calories in the morning? Plus, that hearty first meal seems to stabilize weight-boosting blood sugar levels and helps increase your calorie burn all day long.

So to lose weight, have your highest calorie meal in the morning. Enjoy a diet of fresh fruits and vegetables, healthy fats like olive oil, only 100% whole grains, and lean proteins (beans, nuts, salmon, ocean trout, and skinless poultry). You’ll make a fast break from your overweight past by turning your breakfast around.
Transform Your Breakfast – Eating Habits and Nutrition https://www.sharecare.com/health/eating-habits-nutrition/article/transform-your-breakfast?cmpid=sc-et-em-00-up-01042016&eid=1100006885&memberid=21360647&_sid=52987e7a-0e14-4add-8909-da840b829940

https://www.sharecare.com/health/eating-habits-nutrition/article/transform-your-breakfast?cmpid=sc-et-em-00-up-01042016&eid=1100006885&memberid=21360647&_sid=52987e7a-0e14-4add-8909-da840b829940

Transform Your Breakfast – Eating Habits and Nutrition https://www.sharecare.com/health/eating-habits-nutrition/article/transform-your-breakfast?cmpid=sc-et-em-00-up-01042016&eid=1100006885&memberid=21360647&_sid=52987e7a-0e14-4add-8909-da840b829940 A study of found that eating a big breakfast, mid-sized lunch and small dinner resulted in impressive weight loss; big breakfast seems to be the key.

View on www.sharecare.com https://www.sharecare.com/health/eating-habits-nutrition/article/transform-your-breakfast?cmpid=sc-et-em-00-up-01042016&eid=1100006885&memberid=21360647&_sid=52987e7a-0e14-4add-8909-da840b829940

 

Post 272: Information about the Tower of David Museum which is located in a medieval fortress near the Jaffa Gate in the Old City of Jerusalem-cooking classes this week Paleo Chocolate Zucchini Bread – Elenaspantry

 

The present is all about using caution in traveling around the city. Some venues are just too good to miss. Visitor Info: Tower of David Museum

The museum is located in a medieval fortress near the Jaffa Gate in the Old City of Jerusalem. There will be a few cooking classes this week.

Prices

Visiting the museum

Night Spectacular

* Combined ticket visit the Museum Day and night vision

adult

₪ 40

₪ 55

₪ 70

Veteran

₪ 20

₪ 45

₪ 55

student

₪ 30

₪ 45

₪ 55

Boy (18)

₪ 18

₪ 45

₪ 55

Soldier **

₪ 20

₪ 30

₪ 40

disabled

₪ 15

₪ 30

₪ 40

* Combined ticket: Reduced price entrance to night vision and a separate entrance to visit the Tower of David Museum Day.Visiting day at the Tower of David is exercisable for one year from the date of purchase of the ticket onboard. Night vision possible entry date prior coordination reservation center or on a space available basis. The museum is open in the afternoons and evenings rather than during the nighttime spectacle.
** Soldiers groups: the entrance to visit the museum free day in advance at tel 02-6265347.

Museum tours – for individuals
Hebrew: Mondays and Wednesdays at 10:30 am (July and August also on Fridays at 10:30)
English: Sunday through Thursday, at 11:00 am (July and August also on Fridays at 11:00 am) The tours included entrance fee to the museum.  The tours are held on holidays and public holidays. * Movie Introduction History of Jerusalem will be screened for groups by appointment only, at tel: 02-6265327 or email: Groupsales@tod.org.il

Group Visit Reservations
Tel: 02-6265327 or email: Groupsales@tod.org.il
of their training by phone: 02-6265347 or email: Education@tod.org.il

Card “Member tower”
Login reusable museum during the day for a year.
Adult: 100 ₪, child (under 18) / student / senior citizen: 50 ₪.
The card provides:

  • 6 adult tickets Night Spectacular – 50 ₪
  • 20 adult entrance tickets on 20 ₪
  • Permanent bonus culture in purchasing tickets, tours and meetings at 15% off full price adult (two tickets for each event)
  • Current information and updates on events in the museum early.

Resident Card “Yerushalmi”
card provides:

  • Entrance to the museum during the day – adult 31 ₪, child 13 ₪.
  • ₪ 10 off the nightly spectacle for adults
  • 15% discount on activities, tours and events Tower of David

 

Youth Desk in Jerusalem

Friday | January 8 | 9:30 | Two lectures
culinary Jerusalem through the ages and culinary influences result of migration to Jerusalem in the 19th century

Non chewed history of Jerusalem
professor Edna Assis – tour guide and researcher culinary
culinary Jerusalem ancient period to modern times: the meals from the Second Temple and the innovations that led to Arab local cuisine. What is the worst cooking market? How has the Turkish government on the food in Jerusalem? What powers and brought into the British? What they ate during the siege and austerity?

Bulgur, borax and borscht
Speaker: Mill Netherlands – Chef – author of “forcing”, researcher and tour guide food
culinary, table and kitchen culture of immigrants to Jerusalem in the 19th century. How infiltration powers influenced the culinary Jerusalem? What effect would the pilgrims and Jewish immigrants on the local table? The lecture will deal with new flavors and migrants brought with them their impact on local food – Arab.
The meeting includes a tasting (Supervision: Rabbinate of Israel)

Tickets

http://www.tod.org.il/masah-eating-in-jerusalem/

Paleo Chocolate Zucchini Bread recipe

Paleo Chocolate Zucchini Bread

This is a gluten-free, grain-free, dairy-free recipe for the entire family to enjoy.

Coconut oil, which studies have shown can help our immune systems mount resistance to viruses, is one of the ingredients that gives this bread a moist, rich texture. Sweetened with honey and a bit of vanilla, this makes an excellent after-camp snack for the kids or a summer evening dessert with a cup ofIced Ginger Chai.

Paleo Chocolate Zucchini Bread

Serves: 1 loaf

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. In a food processor combine nut/seed flour and cacao powder
  2. Pulse in salt and baking soda
  3. Pulse in eggs, coconut oil and fruit/brown rice syrup, stevia, then zucchini
  4. Transfer batter to a greased 6.5 x 4 inch baby loaf pan, dusted with almond flour or to paper-lined muffin tins.
  5. Bake at 350° for 35-40 minutes
  6. Cool for 2 hours
  7. Serve

You can also double the recipe and use 1/4c cocoa powder and 80g of Dark Chocolate.

Post 269: Some Places to explore MORROCAN SPICED RED LENTIL SOUP, TUNA/ BROCCOLI/KALE/BEET GREAN QUINOA PATTIES for a Pot – Luck Shabat

 

Into the depths Caving (known as “potholing” in the UK) is not an activity to be attempted alone, or without the proper equipment and preparation. It involves climbing, hiking, rappelling – and no small amount of danger. “It’s possibly the most dangerous challenge sport there is,” says Sergey Shipitsin, one of Israel’s most accomplished speleologists. “In most countries you can not even get insurance for it. It’s also one of the few activities where you can still go where no one has gone before – and even discover things not found beforehand anywhere in the world.”


Caving at the Avivim caves in Israel involves climbing, hiking, rappelling –
and no small amount of danger (Photo courtesy 
Sarma)

Shipitsin, 43, says Israel ranks among cave explorers’ top 10 destinations.”Israel is a dream country for the cave explorer. In Such a small country, we have everything. There is no country in the world like it in this Respect.”

Israel’s four main caving areas are the Jerusalem hills; Mount Sodom;around Peki’in in the Upper Galilee; and the Hebron Hills in the West Bank.

Mount Sodom – basically a block of salt rising 230 meters above the Dead Sea that sank into the ancient lake before being lifted out as a slab by tectonic tremors – is pierced by labyrinth caverns and tunnels formed by rainwater, including the world’s biggest salt caves. “And we have not even started exploring it in depth yet,” says Shipitsin.

If you know where to look, the Jerusalem hills have thousands of caves, many of them eminently explorable. The most interesting cave in Israel, says Shipitsin, is the 2.5-kilometer Ayalon Cave, discovered in April 2006 when a small opening was noticed in a quarry near Ramle. The limestone cave, completely cut off from the outside environment for millennia, sustained an independent, sunlight-free ecosystem. Four crustacean and four terrestrial species previously unknown to science, all without eyes, have been identified already. However, this cave remains closed to the public to allow scientific investigation to continue undisturbed.

2004 In, Shipitsin and some follow cavers set up  Sarma, a non-profit organization dedicated to cave exploration and rescue, Which now has some 3,000 members.

“I started in Russia at age 16,” he says. “Israel has many people experienced in both cave exploration and rappelling. We organize challenge trips underground and training courses of various lengths. You do not have to be particularly fit – we had children aged seven and a 74-year-old in last weekend’s tour. ”

Climb up, rappel down

Israelis wishing to train for rock climbing have their choice of 12 rock-climbing walls – in Ashdod, Haifa, Jerusalem, Kibbutz Ha’Ogen, Kiryat-Ono, Kfar Blum, Petah Tikvah, Ramat Yishai and Tel Aviv.

When it comes to the real deal, Israel has some spectacular sites for rappelling, or the controlled descent down a rope known as “abseiling” in British English and “snappling” in Hebrew. Aficionados say that nothing matches the adrenalin rush of rappelling against the cliffs of the Ramon crater in the Negev, or down wadis in the Judean Desert.

One of the most popular rappelling sites is at Khirbet Oren on Mount Carmel, where the stone wall rises up from the valley almost vertically.Include popular sites Other the Keshet (Arch) Cave on the border with Lebanon and the Pigeons Caves, a Prehistoric site near Karmiel. Then there’s the notoriously challenging Black Canyon trail in the Golan Heights that combines rushing water with hiking through a unique nature reserve.

The quickest way down

Now, free-falling is for the really strong of heart. “Yes, it’s dangerous,” Admits Ziv Kochva, a Parachuting guide at the  Paradive  jump school near Habonim Beach opposite the Carmel mountain range, “But Parachuting is an Empowering experience. It Makes you the think you can do anything – a Tremendous feeling of freedom . Fear that turns into elation: Nothing can be compared with it. Anyone who does not do it once in their life is missing out. ”

Israel has its own skydiving fraternity, many of them graduates of paratroop units or the IDF’s jump school at Tel Nof. One stalwart, Shlomi Perel, jumped for the 15,000th time in January – an Israeli record. Civilian skydivers must take a two-day study course and have at least 10 jumps under their belt before being allowed up to 12,000 feet. But the beauty about parachuting is that you do not need to take a test – anyone can experience it through tandem jumps, in which the thrill-seeker and guide are harnessed together.


A long way down: parachutists get a birds-eye view of the country’s coastline.

Since opening a decade ago, Paradive, the country’s largest jump school, has conducted more than 300,000 jumps. Paradive offers three types of tandem jump: the basic jump, in which the paying client can passively enjoy the ride; “challenge tandem,” in which the customer opens and controls the ‘chute in the air; and “tandem jet,” where the plane drops you off at five kilometers.

“It can be the greatest experience of a lifetime,” Kochva exclaims. “You drop for 50 seconds at 200 kmph, then spend five to seven minutes floating down in one of the most beautiful places in the world. It’s a closed area – a nature reserve and the only part of the Mediterranean coastline closed to flights.”

Parachuting is definitely not a cheap thrill – a basic tandem jump costs about NIS 1,200 ($ 333).

What kinds of people parachute? “Literally all sorts – from 12-year-olds to some in their 70s, and not necessarily former paratroopers,” says Kochva.”We have one elderly gent who’s already done 15 tandem jumps. Often they come as a birthday present – it’s a present they never forget.”

Free flight

First of all, let’s differentiate between the complementary sports of paragliding and hang gliding. Both answer one of our greatest desires: to fly. A hang glider, with its aluminum frame, outperforms a paraglider in terms of speed and glide ratio – but landing a hang glider requires more skill. A paraglider flies more slowly and takes advantage of light conditions, can land in the smallest field and easily folds into the car trunk. Hang gliders are more suitable for blustery conditions. A hang glider pilot flies prone (suspended face down), while paraglider pilots fly supine (seated).

 

​ ​

Israel, where the weather conditions are considered ideal, has no fewer than 25 official launch pads – and thousands of aerial sport fans. The country is blessed with favorable soaring conditions almost year-round. There are several popular launch sites in the Galilee including the Manara cliff near Kiryat Shmonah in the Upper Galilee; the Gilboa mountain; Zichron Ya’akov;off the cliffs overlooking the Mediterranean coastline; and Mount Tabor above the Jezre’el Valley – an excellent thermal machine where, according to a fourth-century Christian legend, Jesus underwent the process of his Transfiguration. Ever since, the hill has been known as “The Mountain of the Leap.”Several professional schools offer courses and equipment rental for everything from glide parachutes to flying dune buggies.

The drink Into

When the waves are high, Thousands of surfers and windsurfers can be spotted frolicking in the Mediterranean waters all along Israel’s coastline.The sea often throws up sufficient swell, and the country has produced some fine surfers, including its first Olympic gold medalist in windsurfing, Gal Fridman.

Surfing here can be traced back to the 1950s, when young Californian physician Dorian Paskowitz immigrated together with six part-balsa longboards and introduced the sport to incredulous Tel Avivians. The days of learning to surf by trial and (Drowning) are long gone error, and surfing schools now dot the country’s coastline.

Not that local adventurism is limited to above sea level: The Red Sea coastline from Eilat, with its magnificent coral reefs and multiple marine species, is renowned worldwide for scuba diving. The Mediterranean coast also has several popular scuba-diving areas, among them the biblical sites of the ancient port of Caesarea and Tel Shikmona near Haifa.

Endless options

OK, it’s not Aspen, but Israel’s sole ski slope features a wide range of ski trails at novice, intermediate and expert levels, plus winter family activities such as sledding and Nordic skiing. The highest point in Israel, Mount Hermon (the chairlift operates year-round) is also a wonderful base for summertime activities such as mountain biking.

In the past decade, mountain biking has become an incredibly popular weekend pastime in Israel, with dozens of biking clubs boasting thousands of members. This compact country boasts myriad bike routes through some of the most diverse terrain you’ll ever ride – you have not lived until you’ve ridden through the Negev desert by moonlight.

And those who thrive on the vibrations of a rumbling engine through their bones will find that Israel is rife with off-road routes for dirt bikes, four-wheel drives and ATVs (all-terrain vehicles). There are dozens of tels (biblical mounds) for drivers / riders who love shooting up and down the slopes.

You do not see the same numbers of skaters tearing up Israeli sidewalks as you do in North American metropolises, but Israeli cities have many new marble-lined plazas that come alive after office hours. The country also has a number of skate parks. The Sporteque in Tel Aviv, the best and biggest park in the country, has a vert, a mini ramp, a mini vert, four quarters, three fun boxes, four banks, two rails, a pyramid and a pro shop.Golda Park in central Tel Aviv is the city’s best unofficial skate spot.Jerusalem boasts a newly rebuilt concrete skate park at Gan Sacher, adjacent to the Supreme Court, while skaters also hang out at Safra Square, next to City Hall.

Crazy Roller in Herzliya has a mini-half pipe and a 3.4 meter high vert, and there are also skate parks in Ra’anana, Katzrin and Shoham. S even a There skate major event in the ancient Roman Amphitheater at Caesarea, sponsored by Red Bull.
Skateboarding has been around in Israel since at least 1978, and is alive and kicking in this corner of the Middle East. And unlike in other countries, skateboarding is not a crime in Israel and there is no police harassment of skaters.

That might not be the case with parkour, also known as free-running – the non-competitive, utilitarian discipline of French origin in which participants negotiate a route lined with urban obstacles using only their bodies’ natural abilities. Law-enforcement officers are keeping a wary eye on Israeli city teenagers taking to their local concrete jungle using a gamut of skills involving leaping, climbing, vaulting, rolling and swinging. Sometimes they can even be spotted leaping from one rooftop to the next.

RED LENTIL SOUP
Ingredients
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 medium yellow onions, chopped
4 garlic cloves, minced or pureed
4 stalks of celery, washed and sliced crosswise 1/2-inch thick
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 generous pinch saffron
1 bay leaf
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 large or 2 medium Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and diced
1 pound red lentils/yellow
2 quarts water
1 cup cooked wheat berries or alfalfa sprouts
6 Italian Roma tomatoes, cored and diced
1/2 bunch cilantro, washed, leaves sliced thin /crosswise or  beet green leaves
CROUTONS TO FLOAT ON A BOWL OF SOUP
1 loaf long skinny bread, sliced on the diagonal 3/4-inch thick
2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil or softened butter

Directions
Heat olive oil in Dutch oven over medium heat. Add onions and cook, stirring, 10 minutes until softened and beginning to color. Add garlic and cook one minute to release its aroma. Add celery and cook 2 minutes until softened. Add 1 teaspoon of salt, the pepper and the turmeric, cumin, ginger, cinnamon, saffron, and bay leaf and cook 2 to 3 minutes to develop the flavor of the spices. Add tomato paste, potatoes, lentils and water and cook 45 minutes; the lentils and potatoes should be quite tender. Stir in remaining 1 teaspoon salt, wheat berries and tomatoes and heat through. Taste and adjust seasoning. Serve garnished with cilantro. I did not add the cilantro. Also guests commented that the cinnamon was not necessary.

CROUTONS TO FLOAT ON A BOWL OF SOUP
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly brush oil or butter on both sides of bread slices. Arrange bread in a single layer on a cookie sheet and bake 10 minutes. Remove from oven and cool croutons on a wire rack.

c.1996, M.S. Milliken & S. Feniger, all rights reserved

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/moroccan-spiced-red-lentil-soup-recipe.html?oc=linkback

TUNA/ BROCCOLI/KALE/BEET GREAN QUINOA PATTIES WITH LEMON CAPER SAUCE adapted from: http://www.allergyfreealaska.com/2014/01/18/tuna-broccoli-quinoa-patties-lemon-caper-sauce/
Serves: 12 three-inch patties
INGREDIENTS
For the Lemon Caper Sauce:
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1 tablespoon capers, minced-OMITTED
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons fresh squeezed lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon dried parsley
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

FOR THE TUNA/ BROCCOLI/KALE/BEET GREAN QUINOA PATTIES

1/2 cup uncooked quinoa/KASHA/MILLET cooked use 3/4 cup
1 cup diced broccoli/KALE/beet greens plus 1 shredded carrot
1/2 cup minced onion
2 cups drained & flaked tuna or salmon (about a 7 ounce can) i used 18 oz total mixed with egg in food processor
1/2 cup blanched almond flour or gluten free bread crumbs or flax meal
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 teaspoon dried dill
Sea salt & fresh ground black pepper/sprorachio sauce/cayenne
2 eggs- I used one with 4 oz flax seed meal
1-3 tablespoons coconut oil, for frying ,seasoned matzah crumbs.

INSTRUCTIONS

TUNA/KALE/BEET/GREENS BURGERS

To make the Lemon Caper Sauce:
In a small mixing bowl, combine all of the ingredients and refrigerate in an air tight container until ready to serve.
To make the TUNA/ BROCCOLI/KALE/BEET GREAN QUINOA PATTIES

Cook the quinoa according to package directions, or use The Better Way to Cook Quinoa method. Drain and cool.
In a medium sized skillet or wok, sauté the vegetables and onions in 1-2 teaspoons of coconut oil over medium heat until they are beginning to turn soft, about 5 minutes. Remove from burner and cool.
In a large mixing bowl, combine the quinoa, vegetables and onions, tuna, almond flour, or substitute, garlic, and dill. Season with fresh ground black pepper to taste.
Stir in the egg.
Warm a tablespoon of coconut oil in a 10-12 inch skillet (this is the one I recommend) over medium heat.
Pack a 1/4 cup metal measuring cup or a falafel maker with patty mixture and carefully ease the mixture out into the skillet. Use the back side of a spatula to press the mixture into a three inch patty, about 1/2-3/4 inch thick. I made mine 1 1/2 in wide by 1/2 inch thick. Made them easier to turn.
Reduce temperature to medium low, and fry the patties for 3-5 minutes on each side, or until they are golden brown. I baked them on parchment in the oven by toping  them with canola oil, Keep adding more coconut oil to the pan as needed. Serve warm or at room temperature with the Lemon Caper Sauce.
RECIPE NOTES FROM MEGAN
I like having a good amount of coconut oil in my frying pan, about a tablespoon, because it makes the outside of the patties nice and crunchy (but that’s just my preference, feel free to do what you like).

If you are using left over cooked quinoa, 1/2 cup of uncooked quinoa equals about 1 3/4 cups of cooked quinoa

Post 266: Ein Avdat National Park – Hike at En Avdat in the Negev, Alpaka Farm, Ramon Crater, Sde Bokr David Ben Gurion’s Home, future places to Explore Shita, and Avdat and UNESCO’s desert cities along the spice-route to Petra from the Negev UNESCO world heritage site – Includes: Incense route from the Arava to Avdat, Haluza, Mamshit, Shivta Preservation of Avda Monks and monasteries – great source New Greek inscriptions from Shivta, Nitzana, Mamshit – Nabatean/Roman/Byzantine cities Ma’ale Akrabbim, Hazeva – Nabatean stations Lentil Barley Soup

An Introduction: The Negev encompasses- 60 % of Israel’s land mass and about 9 % of the population, including many Bedouin tribes, who “live” in reserves. The plan today was to visit Ein Avdat National Park . We hiked in a wadi, part of the park. However the sunny photos in En Avdat are not of our hike-I am including a soup recipe. A long trip requires provisions.

This was an extraordinary day; Many places in the Negev are for a future sunny trip. Hashem did not grace us with sun there today. The day had many wonderful moments.The ruins of the spice route are luminous. Those are also for another trip but are included here just s a sample of the stretches of the Negev.

The NBNefesh bus is leaving from Binyanei HaUman, a few minutes after 8:00 AM with only a few passengers. One stop in Beit Shemesh for the fill up and we are on our way taking the circuitous road to route 6 South over-reaching the showers. The road’s side gullies are dry and there are another  2 hours before reaching the Negev. Nechama and I are raking our brains a bit with Arabic.

We meet several soldiers at a pit-stop, who enjoy practicing their English on us (to my regret). The group are stationed in Rehovot. They also are traveling together with their commanding officer, a smiling Ethiopian girl. She points this out to us with a big wave.

There is always a risk in the winter of showers and flash floods in the eastern and southern wadis.

Due to flooding, our group is stopped at a road-block at the entrance to Ein Avdat National Park. Our guide Noa explains that we are not the only ones to be disappointed and turned away from Ein Avdat National Park.

Clusters of families  were huddled together. They had travelled from the surrounding areas, even from Tel Aviv to “catch a flood”. Check out the following map and U-tube which captures the flood on camera.

Map gives you an idea where Sde Boker is located

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S02RRTlWDPM I am including many additional sites in the Negev.

 Following are some of the features:

The Alpaca farm
The farm is located north of Mitzpe Ramon and houses many different animals such as alpacas, llamas, camels and horses. The farm offers a variety of activities such as hand-feeding, horse-back riding and more.
Makhtesh Ramon – Ramon Crater
The crater is located next to the city of Mitzpe Ramon. The visitors’ center offers a spectacular view of the crater, as well as tourist information, videos and an audio-visual show. Click here for more information about the Ramon Crater. In an earlier post I described an unusual astronomy talk.
Avdat National Park described in this post:Unfortunately our visit does not include this because of the rain.
Visit the remains of an ancient city which served as a camping ground for Nabataean caravans traveling along the early Petra – Gaza road. Open all year round. Allow an hour or two for n full tour of the site.
Neve Midbar Spa: This sounds magnificent:
The spa spans 8,000 square meters and offers three mineral pools, sauna facilities and many relaxing massage treatments.
David Ben Gurion’s desert home: Will visit today.
David Ben Gurion, Israel’s first prime minister, was an avid supporter of settlement in the Negev Desert. His desert home in Kibbutz Sde Boker is now a museum commemorating his life and contribution to the development of the Negev. Click here for more information about David Ben Gurion.
The region offers house-back riding, camel riding, alpaca riding and feeding, jeep and dune buggy tours, spas and beautiful hiking trails.

Exploring the Area

Shivta

Shivta is an impressive site, but it’s in the middle of nowhere, hard to get to, and has no facilities. If you have a car or plan to go on a tour, this can be a very worthwhile, atmospheric excursion — there’s a good chance you’ll have this ruined city all to yourself; otherwise spend your time at the other ruined Nabatean cities of Avdat or Mamshit.

Shivta is about 50km (31 miles) southwest of Beersheva, in the military zone about 8 km (5 miles) off the Nizzana road. It’s important not to get lost in the military zone, so here are explicit directions: From the highway, the Shivta road is two lanes and paved for the first 2.5km (1 1/2 miles). It then narrows, and after another kilometer you pass a road, on the left, to the military installation. After passing this road, it’s another 5km (3 miles) over a rough, curvy one-lane road to Shivta. There are few signs. Officially Shivta is a national park, but there is no office or telephone at this deserted location. Admission, if anyone is around to collect it, is NIS 12 ($3/£1.50) for adults and half-price for children 17 and under.
The Nabateans, a desert merchant people whose capital was the legendary city of Petra, in Jordan, established Shivta in the 1st century B.C., but Shivta (or Subeita) reached its high point during the time of Justinian the Great (6th c. A.D.), when Byzantine wealth and caravan trade were at their height. In addition to commercial wealth, Shivta’s ingenious citizens built an elaborate irrigation and water-collection system that allowed them to farm the barren soil. Israelis are studying Nabatean irrigation techniques to this day.

Eventually trade routes slowly changed, and though Shivta survived as an Arab outpost for many centuries, by the 1100s it was a ghost town.

The ruins of Shivta remained in fairly good condition throughout the centuries because they were too far away from newer building sites to make pillage economical. As a result, the city, which dates from the 500s, is still somewhat intact. Restoration work began in 1958. Buildings restored include three churches, a mosque, a caravansary, two water-collection pools, and houses. Signs identify and discuss the principal buildings.

Sde Boker & Avdat

About 50km (31 miles) due south of Beersheva, surrounded by sand and parched mountains, you suddenly come to a farm settlement — the famous Ben-Gurion kibbutz, Sde Boker. The settlement began in May 1952, at the prime minister’s instigation, when the country was first encouraging settlers to populate the Negev. Ben-Gurion became a member of this kibbutz in 1953; he lived and worked here until his death in 1973, at the age of 87. He and his wife, Paula, are buried here, and his fascinating personal papers, photos, and eclectic collection of books on history, philosophy, and religion may be seen in the Paula and David Ben-Gurion Hut (tel. 08/655-0320 or 655-8444; http://www.bgh.org.il). The hut remains as it was when Ben-Gurion lived in it. Visiting hours are Sunday through Thursday from 8:30am to 3:30pm, on Friday, Saturday, holidays, and holiday eves from 8:30am to 2pm. Admission is NIS 12 ($3/£1.50).

Over the years Sde Boker began to thrive, as did several other young settlements in the Negev. A campus of the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev has been established at Sde Boker. A modern library, housing the Ben-Gurion Institute and Archives (tel. 08/655-5057) and containing 750,000 documents associated with Israel’s first chief of state, is located here. The institute also contains a Research Center for Solar Energy and a Museum of Desert Sculpture, a collection of art created from natural objects and materials found in the desert. The institute also serves as a center for the study of desert areas. It’s open daily from 9am to 5pm; you must phone ahead for tours, which are given by appointment for NIS 10 ($2.50/£1.25).

The graves of David and Paula Ben-Gurion are 3km (2 miles) southwest of the Ben-Gurion House, to the right of the Gate of Sde Boker College. The site, chosen by Ben-Gurion, overlooks the dramatic Zin Valley, with the greenery of the Ein Avdat spring in the distance to the right.

Avdat Archaeological Park, 20km (12 miles) south of the Paula and David Ben-Gurion Hut on Rte. 40 (tel. 08/655-0954), was a major city built by the Nabateans in the 2nd century B.C. as a caravan post on a spice and trading route that ran from the Red Sea to the Nabatean capital at Petra, then to Avdat, Beersheva, and onward to Gaza on the Mediterranean coast. The city reached its peak of importance during Roman and Byzantine times and went into decline after the Roman conquest in the 7th century A.D.

Situated on a cliff 600m (1,969 ft.) above sea level, and with many partially restored structures, Avdat offers dramatic vistas across the desert; along with the ruined Nabatean city of Mamshit, it was used for location shots in the film Jesus Christ Superstar. The western half of Avdat’s acropolis contains the ruins of two Byzantine churches; the eastern section is dominated by the city’s fortress. Beyond the acropolis are a large Byzantine-era wine press and an olive press, evidence of the Nabateans’ amazing ability to irrigate and farm the desolate Negev 1,500 years ago. Admission to the Avdat Archaeological Park is NIS 20 ($5/£2.50) for adults and half-price for those 17 and under. It is open from 8am to 5pm (until 4pm in winter). There is a small visitor center (tel. 08/658-6391) at the entrance offering snacks, very good pamphlets with explanatory maps, and a brief video. Beside the ruins of Avdat, the Hebrew University has operated an experimental farm for the past 40 years in which Nabatean agricultural techniques, as uncovered by archaeologists, are being explored and redeveloped.

Mamshit National Park

The ruins of Nabatean cities carry a certain aura of mystery and grandeur about them. This third ruined Nabatean city, 6km (4 miles) southeast of Dimona, is probably a few centuries older than Avdat and was built on a slightly more important trade route. It was a town of large caravansaries, warehouses, and accounting offices; by Roman times, the town sported large public bathhouses, villas with wall murals, and houses of pleasure. The two large, well-preserved Byzantine-era churches may have been converted to mosques after the Muslim conquest in A.D. 635, judging from Koranic verses inscribed on the walls of their ruins. However, the city seems to have been permanently abandoned not long after that time, and the inscriptions may have been made after the city was no longer inhabited. The ruins are set above Machtesh Ha-Gadol, one of the Negev’s dramatic erosion craters. Mamshit National Park (tel. 08/655-6478) is open daily 8am to 5pm; until 4pm in winter. Admission is NIS 20 ($5/£2.50).

Read more: http://www.frommers.com/destinations/the-negev/275510#ixzz3un9SsT5D

Ein Avdat National Park is located in a beautiful canyon in the Negev desert. The Ein Avdat Spring flows down in a waterfall towards an 8-meter deep pool of water. The oasis created by the springs attracts ibex and other animals.

The oasis at Ein Avdat is created by a number of springs which begin at the southern, or upper, section of the national park. The water creates a number of pools which descend in waterfalls to the lower section of the canyon. The source of the springs is not definitively known, but is generally thought to be rain water which seeps into the ground.

The canyon is actually part of Nahal Zin, which is the longest wadi or dry riverbed in the Negev desert. Nahal Zin begins inMachtesh Ramon and travels 120 kilometers north, although at Ein Avdat the Nahal actually heads east. Nahal Zin andEin Avdat were created by flowing water which eroded the rock and carved canyons.

The first spring is called Ein Ma’arif. This spring creates pools and small waterfalls, finally reaching the main waterfall which is 15 meters high. The waterfall leads into an 8 meter pool of water which is separated into two parts by a man-made dam. This spring is called the Ein Avdat Spring, from which the nature reserve gets its name. The northernmost spring in the park is known as Ein Mor, called for the spice Myrrh (in Hebrew, mor). The name of the spring is fitting, as the park is located near the ancient Nabatean city Avdat on the incense route.

The water is slightly salty, and the trees growing in the area are Euphrates poplar treesatriplexes(commonly known as saltbush), and other salt-loving trees. Also common to the area are Bulbul, rock pigeons, eagles, vultures, hawks, bustards, frogs, crabs, and ibexes.

At the northern, or upper section, of the nature reserve, there are caves which were used b Byzantine monks from Avdat from the 6th century until the Muslim conquest of the area. The monks sculpted shelves, benches, stairs, and water systems from the rock. The caves were also decorated with crosses and prayers were engraved in the rock of the caves.

The Hike which we did nottake but we were on an alternate:

The hike itself is easy, but it requires mobility to climb the steps and ladders. The hike begins at the northern section, which is located neat Ben Gurion’s grave in Sde Boker. Follow the path in an easy walk to the waterfall and pool with the dam.

Next to the dam are steps which lead upwards towards the southern part of the nature reserve. These steps were initially carved by Israeli youth in the 1950s. Follow the steps to the oasis above, bursting with trees and additional pools of water.

From here, additional steps and two ladders lead past the Byzantine Monks’ caves to the upper observatory at the southern end of the park.

 

Tip: The complete hike requires one hour. However, the route is not circular, and can only be done in one direction. If you have two cars, a car can be left at the end of the trail. Alternatively, you could walk to the pools with the dams, return to your car at the lower end, and then drive to the observatory at the upper end. If you can manage it, I advise the hike, which is not difficult and lots of fun!

Tip: No swimming is allowed in the pools, as they are reserved for the animals in the park.

Tip: The park is open from 8:00-16:00 in the winter months, and from 8:00-17:00 in the summer months.

Tip: There is an entrance fee, which includes entrance into the upper and lower sections of the park. There is also a combined ticket which includes entrance to the city of Avdat.

 

IMG_20151214_114057
flowering Negev plant

Tip: Ein Avdat is located off of route 40, just south of Kibbutz Sde Boker.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g6U-VWWC0IM for the film that Yehuda Lev took on the NBNefesh Trip this past Monday, 8th Day of Chanukah

IMG_20151214_114357
Negev native, shiny, bright drinking in the rain water

 

IMG_20151214_114403
Notice the water droplets. Our group arrived as the rain was stopping

Serve and Learn:

Ben-Gurion University in Beer-Sheva (www.ipsl.org/programs/israel.html) invites foreign students to study and do volunteer service in Israel. The program includes an intensive Hebrew language course and exposes students to Israeli culture, history and society. Students may also choose among several trips, including a visit to a kibbutz or an archaeological dig. Students must volunteer 15-20 hours a week doing such things as tutoring Russian and Ethiopian immigrants and orphaned Israeli children; helping Bedouins transition from their desert village to modern Israel; helping ex-prisoners reenter society; or working on environmental projects. Cost is $10,500 per semester, excluding airfare, food, and certain other expenses. Financial aid and scholarships are available. – See more at: http://www.jwmag.org/page.aspx?pid=579#sthash.bq9uMDBX.dpuf

Ben Gurion's library
Ben  Gurion’s library (a portion)

Ben Gurion was well versed in Tanach. His officers also knew that he admired “lived”  with three leaders, Moses, Lincoln and Gandhi.

It is telling that in a few days will be the tenth of Tevet. The Tenth of Tevet (Hebrew: עשרה בטבת‎, Asarah BeTevet), the tenth day of the Hebrew month of Tevet, is a fast day in Judaism. It is one of the minor fasts observed from before dawn to nightfall. The fasting commemorates the siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylonia—an event that began on that date and ultimately culminated in the destruction of Solomon’s Temple (the First Temple) and the conquest of the Kingdom of Judah (today southern Israel).

Our group viewed a film (made up of half cartoon half actors) introducting the viewer to Ben Gurion’s rise to power. Other key players and the cabinet:

David Ben-Gurion, Prime Minister and Minister of Defense, Eliezer Kaplan, Minister of Finance, Behor Shalom Shitrit, Minister of Police and Minorities, Yitzhak Greenbaum, Minister of the Interior

Ze’ev Sharef, Cabinet Secretary,

Felix Rosenblueth, Minister of Justice

Moshe Shapira, Minister of Immigration and Health

Yitzhak Meir Levin, Minister of Social Welfare

Yehuda Maimon (Fishman), Minister of Religious Affairs and War Casualties

Peretz Bernstein, Minister of Trade, Industry and Supplies.

Mordechai Bentov, Minister of Labor and Construction

Aharon Zisling, Minister of Agriculture

David Remez, Minister of Transport

Moshe Shertok (Sharett), Foreign Minister -They did not all agree with Ben Gurion that Jerusalem had to be held and the siege broken at all costs.


 

We saw a film/ cartoon meant for school groups before entering the house.

Ben-Gurion’s Hut

One cannot walk away from a visit to Ben Gurion’s home without strong impressions of the country’s “Founding Father”. He was ruthless in his goal of a single army to defend the state (i.e. the Alelena Affair). Opposing the left, he was not agreeable to the borders in the Partition Plan – UNGA Resolution 181, once Israel was attacked in 1948. On November 29, 1947 the UN General Assembly to adopt the partition plan, by a vote of 33 to 13, recommending the establishment of two states – Arab and Jewish – in the area and Jerusalem as an international enclave. We know what happened after that. Once the state was announced Ben Gurion was the prime mover in establishing institutions and furthering the ones already in existence.

In 1955, Israeli Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion challenged his people to develop the Negev and make it flourish. “Israel’s capacity for science and research will be tested in the Negev … and this effort will determine the fate of the State of Israel and the standing of our people in the history of mankind,” he declared.

Members of The Negev Funding Coalition — a consortium of Jewish Federations, foundations and other funders committed to developing arts, culture, education, health care, science and technology initiatives in the region — recently met in Delaware to discuss their progress in fulfilling Ben-Gurion’s vision for making the Negev a vital and vibrant place to live and work.

The conference, which was sponsored by Jewish Federations of North America, featured a keynote presentation by Rear Admiral (Ret.) Hezi Meshita, the deputy director of the Southern Relocation Administration for the Israel Ministry of Defense. Meshita termed this “the decade of the Negev” and expressed excitement at the impact of four proposed development projects.

The CyberSpark booth at the Cyber Tech conference in Tel Aviv

Chief among them is the construction of a new $650 million training facility located 20 miles outside of Beer-Sheva. Beginning in late 2014, 10,000 soldiers will be moved to the new base from their current quarters in Tel Aviv. The program will centralize combat support training that is currently conducted at multiple sites throughout Israel.

Three more “mega bases” are expected to be built in the Negev by 2020 — part of a strategic plan to vacate the land and buildings that the Israel Defense Forces currently occupies in high-end Tel Aviv and central Israel in order to bring jobs and investments to Israel’s south. As part of this initiative, the Israeli air force base at Tel Aviv’s Ben-Gurion International Airport has already relocated to Netavim.

According to Meshita, these major military projects should bring one million new residents to the Negev. A new national cyber security research and development center called CyberSpark will open soon at Beer-Sheva’s Advanced Technology Park (ATP) in cooperation with BGU, adjacent to the University’s Marcus Family Campus. Lockheed Martin and IBM announced that they would invest in CyberSpark facilities, joining fellow cyber-security leaders Deutsche Telekom, EMC, RSA and many startups in the field.

The 16-building park is the only one of its kind in the world that includes Fortune 500 companies, cyber-incubators, academic researchers and educational facilities as well as national government and security agencies. The complex will also include a high school geared toward science and technology.BGU is the site of another project funded by the coalition.

The University’s Clean Technology Initiative strives to maximize the development of renewable materials and energy resources by providing fellowships to BGU graduate students interested in studying this new field and by supporting a new business plan competition for clean tech development, which targets Negev-based startups as well as BGU students.

“We have already received more than 25 entries — all environment Researchally and ecologically sound projects that will help drive development in the Negev,” says Doron Krakow, AABGU’s executive vice president.

Sam Katz, co-chair of the Philadelphia-Netivot Partnership Committee and AABGU supporter, is excited by the growth of arts and cultural initiatives throughout southern Israel and is particularly proud of one project that he helped to spearhead in Netivot.

Remember, the ancient cities in the Negev were not uncovered before the founding of the state. Background: The ancient city of  Avdat (Oboda) was initially a station on the Incense Route in the Negev highlands. It was developed to a city by the Nabateans starting in the 3rd C BC. During the Roman period the city was part of the defense and transportation systems of the Empire, and flourished during the Byzantine period with the construction of Churches, structures, workshops and vast agriculture farming. The city was finally abandoned in the 7th C following an earthquake. It became a National park and World Heritage site, a recommended site on the road to the south.

Location and aerial map: The site is located in the middle of the Negev desert highland, between Beer Sheba and the Ramon Crator. The ruins of the ancient city are located on the edge of a high plateau, east side of highway #40.

If you travel south to Eilat via Mizpeh-Ramon, Avdat is a great place to stop – even for just one hour. There is an easy access road from the visitor’s center up to the ruins, which leads to the parking place near the Roman Tower.

 

  Point on the yellow points to navigate to the selected point.

 

 

 

 

History:

 

  • The Incense / Spice route

 

   The Incense & Spice route connected the east (Yemen and Oman), through Arabia, via the Nabatean capital city Petra, to the port city of Gaza on the shore of the Mediterranean Sea. This road, with a total length of 2,400 km, passed through harsh desert areas. It  was used by the Nabateans to export the incense and spices from southern Arabia and the Far east to the Classic world of Greece and Rome.

Caravans of camels carrying the merchandise along the Incense route

 

 

The Biblical map below shows its path, with Avdat (Oboda) in the center of the Negev desert. The city started in the 3rd C BC as a fortified station (number 62) along this route, and protected the valuable cargo from robbers.  It also supplied water, food and shelter to the caravans.

 

Map of the Incense/Spice route – during the Nabatean and Roman/Byzantine  periods  (based on Bible Mapper 3.0)

 

  • The Nabateans

 

The Nabateans originated from Arabia, where they have been nomadic tent dwellers. The name “Nabat” may have originated from the word meaning “of-Arab”, a name which is known since the 10th C BC.   Their language was Aramaic and many of their words were Arabic. The Nabatean script is similar to the Moab script. Although they have not left any books, the research of their history is based on the inscriptions on tombs, and on Greek and Roman historians, such as Diodorus Siculus (half of 1st C BC) and Josephus Flavius (half of 1st C AD). The Nabateans excelled in ceramics, mastered in collecting the desert water, and were skilled merchants.

 

The Nabateans prospered from the operation of the Incense and Spice route, and established stations and cities along the route. This commercial enterprise started around the 5th or 4th C BC, and made these merchants rich. Their new capital city in Edom, called Petra, based on the Greek word for Rock. In the Bible it is also named ‘rock’ (Sela in Hebrew). Judges 1 36: “And the coast of the Amorites was from the going up to Akrabbim, from the rock, and upward”, Isaiah 16 1:”Send ye the lamb to the ruler of the land from Sela to the wilderness, unto the mount of the daughter of Zion.” Petra was the center of a vast Kingdom: the kingdom included the Negev and Sinai, Northern Arabia, Moab and Hauran (Houran).   The Nabateans mastered the utilization of the scarce rainfall in the desert area, by collecting the surface runoff into hidden cisterns, and then used it for their water supply and the development of desert agriculture.

 

The Nabateans arrived to the Negev during the Persian period (about the 4th C BC). Prof A. Negev, the excavator of Avdat and other Nabatean sites, defines 3 periods in the history of the Nabateans in the Negev:

  • Early Nabatean period (4th-1st C BC) – the nomad period during the Persian and Hellenistic periods
  • Middle Nabatean period (25BC to 50/70AD) – the trade empire – during the Early Roman period
  • Late Nabatean period (70/80 to 150AD) – the urban agriculture period – during the Early Roman period

 

  • Alexander the Great (332 BC) and successors – Hellenistic period

 

 When Alexander the Great arrived to the area (332BC), the Nabateans suffered from his Army. The Greeks set siege on Gaza, their important outlet to the Sea,  and conquered it after 2 months. The entire population was killed or sold to slavery, and replaced by new residents. The Greeks also fought against their allies, the Nabateans, and attacked Lachish.  This was a major setback to the Nabateans.

   After Alexander’s death, the Greeks continued to hit the Nabateans. Learning about the riches of Petra, the Greek general Antigonus sent his forces in 311 to capture and loot their capital city Petra.  Although the Nabateans managed to retrieve the stolen treasures after one night, they learned their lesson – the Incense route must be protected.

 

  • Establishment of Avdat (3rd C BC)

 

In order to support & protect the Incense route, the Nabateans established stations and fortresses along the road. One of these stations, located in the Negev highland, is Avdat. It was established in the 3rd C BC, and was later named after their king Avdat/Obodas.

 

  • Hasmonean-Nabatean battles (2nd -1st C BC)

 

During the Hasmonean dynasty, the early Jewish Kings worked together with the Nabateans. This changed when in  about 100 BC the Hasmonean King Alexander Jannaeus conquered the port city of Gaza, the final station of the Incense route. Gaza was under Nabatean control since the Persian period, and the loss of the city was a major defeat for the Nabateans, causing their cities along the route to decline. On the other hand, the possession of Gaza made the Hasmoneans richer and was one of the important sources of income for the Jewish Kingdom.

 

   King  Obodas (Avdat) I ruled the Nabatean Kingdom from 96-85 BC. He defeated Alexander Jannaeus in a battle northwest of Philadelphia (modern day Amman) in 95BC. This Nabatean victory gave the city its name.

 

  Later, King Obodas III (ruled 30-9BC) developed the city and was buried there. His silver coin is illustrated here, with his bust on the left side with the word “Avdat” to his right. His queen is seen on the reverse side on the right coin, with the mint date and also an inscription of a blessing by the Nabatean God Dushara.

 

Nabatean coin of Obodas III (30-9BC) – Drawing by Rina

Left Obverse: bust of Obodas III, “Avdat” 

Right Reverse: draped queen  “Year — Barcat Dushara”

 

    The Hasmonean Kingdom controlled Gaza until the Roman conquest by Pompey the Great forty years later (63BC).

 

  • Early Roman period (1st C AD)

 

   Only during the time of Herod the Great (37-4BC) the Mediterranean ports were reopened and the Incense route revived, bringing Avdat a new era of prosperity.   The city continued to prosper and develop under the reign of the Nabatean King Areta (Khartat) IV (9-40AD).  This period is the Nabatean’s golden age, with fifty years of prosperity. The acropolis of Avdat, the pottery workshop, the army camp, and other remains of structures date to this period. At this time there were few residential houses in the city, and the majority lived in tents in the area outside the city walls.

    Avdat was damaged by attacks of Arab tribes (the Thamuds and other Arabian tribes) during the middle of the 1st C AD. An evidence of fire was found in most of the excavated areas. The city was later reconstructed and further developed by King Rabbel II (70-106AD) who managed to deal with the invasion of the tribes and the economic changes following the decline of the Incense route.

   The Incense route started to decline at the end of the 1st C AD, since it was replaced by other routes through the Roman empire. The Nabateans gradually  switched to the development of desert agriculture and providing support to the Roman army and travelers along the desert roads. This successful transition – from the operation of the route to desert agriculture – revived the wealth of the Kingdom. According to some archaeologists, the desert farming was brought in only during the Byzantine period.

 

  • Roman Annexation (106AD)

 

    In 106AD the Romans annexed the Nabatean Kingdom.  It became part of the defense and road systems of the Roman empire, and appears on the Peutinger map (based on a 4th C Roman military road map) as “Oboda”  (marked by a red square) as a station on the road from Jerusalem to Eilat.  Note that the orientation of the Roman map is north on the right side. The Incense route is not shown on the map. 

   The Roman annexation brought a substantial religious change – from the Nabatean Semite religion to the paganism of the Roman world.

Peutinger Roman Military Map:   Oboda/Avdat (in red)  is a station along the road from Jerusalem to Eilat

 

 

  • Byzantine period (4th – 7th C AD)

 

The Nabateans converted to Christianity and their temples were replaced by two Churches and a monastery. A large residential quarter was built, as well as other installations and structures. The city continued to develop, but reached a tragic end following a massive earthquake in around 630BC. This led to the abandonment of the city.

 

  • Rediscovery (19th C)

 

The Arabic name of the ruins was Eboda, which preserved the ancient name.  Palmer and Drake were the first researchers who correctly identified the location of Avdat (1870). The first archaeological detailed survey was conducted by Musil (1902), and the first excavations were by Colt (1937), Avi-Yonah (1958), and A. Negev (1959-1960). These were followed by excavations by A. Negev and R. Cohen (1975-1977), P. Fabian (1993-1994, 1999) and T. Erikson-Gini (1999-2000). Recent restorations are conducted (2010-2011) after the site was vandalized.

The site became a UNESCO World heritage site in 2005, and was listed together with the Incense route from Avdat to Moa in the Arava (65KM long).

 

 

City Plan:

 

The city is located on a high (alt 620m) plateau, about 160m above above the valley to the west (where the ancient road passed, and the modern road and visitor center are located).

 

A plan of the ancient city is seen in the diagram below, highlighting the major sights. The pink areas are dated to the Nabatean and Roman periods, while other areas date to the Byzantine period.

  You can click on most of the titles in order to jump to the relevant section.

 

 

 

Photos:

 

 

(a) General View

 

The western edge of the city is seen from the visitor’s center. The ruins of the city are located on a plateau high above the course of the road.

 

Click on the photos to view in higher resolution…

 

A panoramic view, as seen from the Roman tower towards the city, in seen in the following picture. If you press on it, a panoramic viewer will pop up. Using this flash-based panoramic viewer,  you can move around and zoom in and out, optionally click on hotspots and view the site in full screen mode.   Note that it may take minutes to upload.

 

  To open the viewer, simply click on the photo below.

 

 

(b) South hillside

 

The access road ascends from the visitor center up to the Roman tower, along the southern side of the city. The red square on the plan of the city shows the position of the southern hillside. The city was once protected by a wall, and the road passes along its path.

 

 

  Along the hillside are traces of the wall and other ruins, such as the house seen in the photo below.

 

 

 

Another view of the south-west hillside is below:

 

 

The south western side of the city – the acropolis – is better seen after climbing up the road. A lookout platform is located at the edge of the higher side, where the ruins of a Nabatean temple are in the process of reconstruction.

 

 

(c) Southern Villa

 

On the south side of the Avdat ridge are ruins of a Roman villa. This is how it looks from its north side:

 

 

The villa has several rooms which were built around a square courtyard. At the center of the courtyard is a cistern.

 

 

The roof was supported by arches, of which a pair were reconstructed in one of the rooms:

 

 

Another view of the arches:

 

 

From this side is a great view of the vast desert area around Avdat. This is the view towards the south:

 

 

Also seen, on the south-west side, are agriculture farming areas which are reconstruction of the ancient irrigation and cultivation methods. During  the Roman and Byzantine periods these farms supplied the city with fresh products, and were also one of the sources of the city’s income, since the Nabateans used to grow crops  and sell it to the Army.

 

 

Another view of the villa, this one from the exterior:

 

 

(d) Roman Tower

 

 

      After completing the tour of the the southern villa, you continue to drive up the access road and reach to the parking area on the south-east side of the city. This is where the walking tour of the city begins.

   A lookout tower, dated to the Roman period, is the first interest point inside the city. Its location on the plan of the city is indicated by a red square on the right.

   The tower is built along the city wall. It was constructed in 294 AD according to the inscription above its entrance.

    A view of the tower from its west side can be seen in the picture below.

 

 

 

The entrance to the tower is from this side:

 

 

Another view of the tower, this one from the south-east side, is in the picture below. The roof of the tower affords great views of the area.

 

 

Standing on the roof of the tower, there is a great view of the Avdat acropolis and the southern hillside. (If you want to see the panorama again using the flash view, press here. Note that it loads  slowly…)

 

The far structure, seen among the ruins, is an agriculture installation used for wine production. It is dated to the Byzantine period, and was one of the five winepress installations found in Avdat.

 

 

(e) Byzantine Quarter

 

 

  Beyond the city wall and the Roman tower is a vast area of ruins, which is still undergoing archaeological excavations and preservation. This residential quarter is dated to the Byzantine period. Its location is indicated on the map as a red square.

The quarter was first  established during the Roman period, and was destroyed in an earthquake around 630AD.

   A view of one of the structures is shown below.

 

 

Another section of the dwelling houses:

 

 

Arches were used in order to support the roof and the second level of the house:

 

 

The Byzantine quarter consists of a main street in the direction of south-east to north-west, directed towards the fortress which is seen in the background. The dwelling structures are built on both sides of the street.

 

 

The street has a system of water channels, such as this one shown below, which lead the rain water from the roofs to collecting cisterns as seen on the lower-left side. These cisterns were the main source of water supply for the residents.

 

 

Along the main road are residential dwellings in various stages of reconstruction.  The structures were leveled in the 7th C by an earthquake and remained in ruins since then, following the decline of the Incense route and the Arab conquest.

 

 

A closer view of one of the structures. The two level building uses arches to support the upper floor.

 

 

A set of sculptures, with a shepherd and his goats,  highlight the ancient nature of the busy street.

 

 

 

 

 Another view of the shepherd and his goat, drinking from the water cistern, is in the next picture. During the Roman and Byzantine period the Nabatean residents became suppliers to the Army, and turned the areas around the city from a desert into green areas of farming and grazing lands.

 

(f) City Fortress

 

 

   The city fortress, located at the edge of the main street, was built also in the Byzantine period. Its purpose was to protect the residents in time of attacks. Its location on the city plan is indicated as a red square.

   The fortress is 63m long by 43m wide. The south-eastern tower, another good observation point, is shown in the following picture. An entrance to the fortress is on its right side.

 

 

Inside the fortress is a wide open court, with a large cistern located in its center. The water channel in the picture below feeds rainwater into the cistern. On the north side of the court is a prayer chapel (but is not seen here).

 

 

A closer view of the water reservoir is in the photo below. It is now dry, but a pair of pigeons (seen flowing away) use its shade to nest.

 

 

The entrance of the water into the underground water reservoir is shown in greater detail the next photograph. Water in this dry land, with only 80mm of annual rainfall, is precious. The surface and roof rain runoff was the only solution for this city, since there were no available springs in the vicinity to bring the water into the city.

 

 

(g) Nabatean Temples

 

Beyond the fortress is another wide open area of the Nabatean temples and churches plaza.  This area is indicated as a red square on the map.

 In this area there were one or more Nabatean temples, which were later replaced by Churches.

 

 A western view of the paved area is seen in the photo below.

 

 

On the north side of the area is a gate house:

 

 

A closer view of the gate house:

 

 

The gate opens to the north area outside of the city.

 

 

Another section of the walled area, as seen in the northwest view:

 

 

(h) Southern Church

 

 

  The southern church was part of a Byzantine monastery of St. Theodoros. It is located on the south-west side of the city, as indicated on the city plan with a red square.

   According to the inscriptions found on the floor of the church, it dates to the 6th and 7th C AD. 

 

   An illustration of the church is shown below, based on the model that was on display at the site:

 

  • Atrium

 

   The Atrium, the open court before the church, is located on its west side and sizes 15 x 14m. It is paved and consists of four rows of columns. The columns, made of hard limestone, were based on the original Nabatean temples built by King Areta (Khartat) IV (9-40AD).

 

 

A large cistern is located under the floor of the courtyard.

 

 

A southern view of the court yard. It probably had a second floor.

 

 

The courtyard is surrounded  by rooms on its three side. The next picture shows one of the rooms on the south side of the courtyard.

 

 

  • Entrance to the Church

 

On the eastern wall are the three entrances to the church, seen here behind the eastern row of columns.

 

 

The entrance from the atrium is seen also from the inner side of the church.

 

 

  • The Church

 

The church is a three-aisled pillared basilica with three apses. The apses are located on its eastern side (as all ancient churches). The central apse, where the main altar stands, is seen in the middle of the following picture.

 

 

The main altar is located on a low raised platform.

 

 

The following picture shows a closer view of the main altar, with a table in the center of the apse.

 

 

A view from the main altar towards the west:

 

 

Another view of the nave – the central approach to the main altar.

 

 

  • Inscriptions

 

A number of tomb inscriptions (epitaphs)  were found in the floor of the church. The marble slabs bear Greek inscriptions dating from 541 to 618AD. One of these tombs is seen on the south-eastern corner.

 

 

A closer view of the inscription on the south-eastern corner:

 

 

Another epitaph is located on the north-east corner, on the floor behind the fallen column.

 

 

A closer view of the inscription:

 

 

Yet another epitaph is seen in the next picture:

 

 

  • North Apse

 

A limestone chancel screen stands on the path towards the northern apse.

 

 

Behind it is the northern apse.

 

 

  • Stones

 

In other rooms and locations, there are some notable stone objects, such as the water vessel below:

 

 

Another interesting carved limestone:

 

 

Outside of the church, embedded in the stone, seems like a footprint. What does it mean?

 

 

Another footprint is drawn on a rock painting:

 

 

(i) Lookout Platform

 

 

On the western edge of the acropolis is a lookout platform, which is situated on the ruins of a Nabatean temple. It affords remarkable views of the area west of the city. The location of this spot is indicated as a red square on the map.

  A western view of the lookout platform is shown in the picture below. There are current (year 2011) restoration works on the site.

 

 

 

From the platform are great views of structures below, such as this structure on the south-west corner.

 

 

Another view of the south side is shown in the next picture.

 

 

Another base of a structure is seen on the northern hillside.

 

 

(j) Baptistery

 

 

    On the north side of the lookout platform is a large Byzantine baptistery, which was part of the adjacent Northern Church complex. Its location is indicated as a  red square on the map.

  In the  larger pool, which is in the shape of a cross (see photo below), adults were immersed in the water during the process of conversion to Christianity. On its left side is a smaller pool for babies.

 

 

 

A closer view of the adult (right) and the babies (lower left) baptisteries is seen next.

Note that a similar  cruciform baptismal design is found in the south and north churches in Shivta and the Eastern church ofMamshit.

 

 

 

(k) Repairs

 

In October 2009 two Bedouin youths smashed and toppled columns and caused severe damages to the site. A team of archaeologists and workers are working for months to repair the damages, and continue to restore and preserve the antiquities. The photo shows a repair to the wall of the Northern Church.

 

 

The next photograph shows repairs in the area of the southern church.

 

 

(l) Eastern Side

 

  The eastern side of the city has a number of additional sights which can be reached by foot.

    One of them is a reconstructed army camp, which is marked as as a red square (its location is actually farther to the east). Near it is a structure which was a Nabatean pottery workshop.

 

   Additional structures are located around the city area, such as the structures seen in the photograph below.

 

 

 

An impressive army camp was excavated, located 300m north east of the city. The camp’s size  is 100m square. It contains 8 long, multi-chambered structures.  About 2,000 soldiers would have been stationed here, which is a large force – the size of one legion. The scholars debate if this was a Nabatean camp or a Roman camp. Near the camp are ruins of a large house, which may have served as the camp’s brothel.

The camp was in use until the middle of the 1st C AD, and abandoned following the decline of the Incense route, probably since the Nabateans could not afford any longer to finance the large number of soldiers.

 

 

Ancient camel pens are located on the eastern side of the city. A cluster of metal sculptures demonstrate a typical camel and donkey convoy coming from Petra.  Note that a typical convoy was made up to a maximum of 25 camels.

 

 

(m) West side – Reconstructed Byzantine house, City of Caves

 

 

On the western hillside, just below the lookout platform, is an area termed “the city of caves”. The location of the area open to the public is illustrated as a red square in the city map on the right. It is accessed from a parking place, which can be reached halfway down back to the visitor center.

   One of the dwellings in this area, with a large cave in its back portion, was excavated and reconstructed. Its southern side is shown in the following photograph. 

 

 

The house is dated to the Byzantine period. The owner of the house may have been a wealthy wine merchant.

 

 

The entrance to the house leads into a courtyard surrounded by a number of rooms. One of them served as a toilet.

 

 

A view of the rooms in the house:

 

 

Inside the room, a reconstruction of the winery in operation. Wine production was one of the main  sources of income in the Negev area. The desert climate, with extremely cool nights during winter with plenty of  sunshine during spring and summer created an excellent quality dry wine which was in much demand during the Roman and Byzantine periods.

 

 

A large cave is located in the back of the house. The cave has two rooms, and was used for storage of wheat, dry fruit and as a winery.

 

 

The interior of one of the rooms:

 

 

Another room:

 

 

The next picture shows a view of the other entrance to the cave, and additional structures around the house.

 

 

The city wall passes just below the house and extends to the north. The picture below shows the northern hillside where the city wall continued.

 

 

(n) Visitor center

 

To the west of the ruins of the city is the visitor center. The office sells entrance tickets, presents an audiovisual presentation and offers information. Several stones and vessels are on display. Nearby, 100m to the north, is a well preserved Byzantine period bathhouse.

 

 

An adjacent coffee show and petrol station is a convenient place to stop and refuel.  We highly recommend to have a one or two hour stops at this site on the way to Eilat or back.

 

 

Etymology (behind the name):

 

  • Avdat, Ovdat – named after the Nabatean king Obodas. King Obodas I ruled from 90-87 BC, and defeated Alexander Jannaeus in a battle near Golan. This Nabatean victory gave the city its name. Later, Obodas III (ruled 30-9BC) developed the city and was buried there.

With high speed trains this entire area will open up to tourists.

Lentil Barley Soup

Lentil Barley Soup

Based on a recipe by J. Raymond

Thick enough to be called a stew, this hearty soup is easy to prepare and cooks in a single pot. Add more water or stock if you wish to have a thinner soup.

* 1 cup black lentils, rinsed
* 2 stalks celery, sliced
* 1/2 cup hulled or pearled barley
* 1/2 tsp oregano
* 6 cups water or vegetable stock
* 1/2 tsp ground cumin
* 1 onion, chopped
* 1/4 tsp black pepper
* 2 garlic cloves, minced or crushed
* 1/8-1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
* 2 carrots, sliced
* 1/2 tsp salt (optional)
* 2-4 cups fresh spinach (optional)

Place all ingredients except salt into a large pot and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the lentils and barley are tender, about 1 hour. Add salt to taste and spinach, if desired. Cook briefly until spinach is wilted but still bright green.

Tips:

Pearl barley is the variety most commonly sold in supermarkets. Natural food stores offer hulled barley, which is slightly less refined and cooks in about the same amount of time.

This soup can also be prepared in a crockpot. If you start with boiling water it will cook in 1 to 2 hours; with cold water, 5 to 6 hours

To cook in a pressure cooker, put all ingredients except salt and spinach into cooker and bring it to high pressure. Cook at high pressure for 12 minutes; then bring pressure down with a quick-release method. Lentils should be cooked, but barley may not be completely tender. Cook until barley reaches the desired state of tenderness, about 15 minutes, adding water if a thinner consistency is needed. Then add salt and spinach, if desired. Cook briefly until spinach is wilted but still bright green.

Servings: 6

Nutrition info per serving: 78 calories, 4 g protein, 16 g carbohydrate, 0.2 g fat, 159 mg sodium

Adapted from NewCenturyNutrition.com

–=

Post 260: Nas Gadol on Yirmiyahu Street-Nachal Charedi Soldier Shot And Killed The Palestinian Terrorist: Yiddish words in Chanukah, Chanukah recipes updated for healthy soufganiot

HERO: The Soldier That Shot And Killed The Palestinian Terrorist On Yirmiyahu Street Is From Nachal Charedi [PHOTO]
(Sunday, December 6th, 2015 01:25 PM) Yeshivah World News

Stay Connected To The Jewish Culture Through YIDDISH!!

http://www.amazon.com/Yiddish-Lessons-Home-Study-Program/dp/1628471050

Some Yiddish Words For Chanukah
Yiddish
Phonetically English   Hebrew
menoyre        menorah  מנורה
חנוכיה
this week’s proverb
אַלעס פאַרלירט דער מענטש מיט די יאָרן; יוגענט, שיינהייט,געזונטהייט, ליבּע פאַר כּבוד; נאָר איין זאַך בּלײַבּט אים – זײַן נאַרישקייט

transliterated
a’les farlirt der mentsh mit di yorn; yugent, sheynheit, gezunt’heyt, li’be far koved; nor eyn zakh blaybt em – zayn narishkeyt

the proverb actually means
a person loses everything as he grows older; youth, beauty, health, esteem or self respect; only one thing remains with him – his stupidity

translated to Hebrew

עם ההתבגרות הבן אדם מאבד את

הכל; הצעירות, היופי, הבריאות,רדיפה אחרי

הכבוד; רק דבר אחד תמיד יישאר איתו – הטיפשות

It’s almost Chanukah – The soufganiot recipe of the past (Post #40), has been revised. The dough now has addition of sour dough. I started with a yield of 1.25 K of dough and out of that made 30 balls of 40 grams each soufganiot for the freezer.

Always on the look-out for something “new”, my soufganiot with have red bean paste filling.

Adapted from Epicrious

Red Bean Paste Filling

YIELD Makes 1 1/2 cups
INGREDIENTS

6 ounces small red beans hoong dul, about 1 cup
1/2 cup packed dark brown sugar/brown rice syrup
1 1/2 teaspoons vegetable oil
PREPARATION

Wash the beans, cover the cold water, and soak overnight. Drain beans and discard water.
I allow the beans to sprout over two days and pull off the skins.
They take less time to cook when they have sprouted.

Place beans in a 1 1/2-quart saucepan, add 3 cups cold water, and bring to a boil over high heat. Cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 1 hour, or until very soft. Monitor the pan to make sure water doesn’t dry up. Drain and discard the water.

You can also use a pressure cooker.
Place the beans in a food processor and process until smooth. Add brown sugar/brown rice syrup and process until just combined. In a medium saucepan, heat the vegetable oil over medium heat until hot but not smoking. Add the bean paste and cook, stirring 2 to 3 minutes, or until the mixture is dry. Remove from heat. Store in a covered container in the refrigerator until ready to use; it will keep for 1 week.
Reprinted with permission from The Wisdom of the Chinese Kitchen by Grace Young. © 1999 Simon & Schuster.

Sufganiyot (Israeli Jelly Doughnuts) Made these in past years with the help of my grand-daughter, when she was here for a gap year.

Sufganiyot (Israeli Jelly Doughnuts).

I doubled the recipe for a crowd.

1 package dry yeast-.25 oz
3 tablespoons sugar/agave/rice syrup
1/4 cup water
1/2 cup lukewarm milk/almond milk
3 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour, spelt, oat (about)
1 large egg
1 large egg yolk (in addition to the whole egg) you may omit and use an equivalent volume of flax seed meal.
1 cup powdered sugar or added powdered cinnamon.I leave this out.
Filling: equal parts, carob, cocoa, almond, tahina, chocolate bits or pieces of 100% chocolate bar with added oatmilk/rice milk, chocolate liquor, vanilla combined in food processor.

The second part of the soufganiot stuffing can be either frozen mango drained or plum or apple compote (drained) or defrosted frozen cherries or blueberries. No powdered sugar. No stuffing tool needed.
I can’t give amounts because I make the filling fresh with the defrosted batch of soufaniot dough. Check out Post 40 for more details of making the frozen soufganiot dough.

IMG_20151206_134723
Enter a captiazuki bean with beet broth before cooking in pressure cookeron

 

IMG_20151206_174916
Filling for adzuki bean soufganiot Enter a caption

 

IMG_20151204_094252
Endough before broken doen to 40 gram balls. ter a caption

Morrocan Carrot and Chickpea Salad
If you’re pinched for time, Diane suggests using pre-shredded carrots. I deployed my mandolin and made thin coins. I use some of the carrot tops as well, although there are mixed opinions about whether or not they’re edible (or edible for everyone) – you can read more here and here.

Dressing:
1 tablespoon cumin seeds
1/3 cup / 80 ml extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon honey
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more to taste
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

10 ounces carrots, shredded on a box grater or sliced whisper thin on a mandolin

2 cups cooked chickpeas (or one 15- ounce can, drained and rinsed)

2/3 cup / 100 g dried pluots, plums, or dates cut into chickpea-sized pieces

1/3 cup / 30 g fresh mint, torn

For serving: lots of toasted almond slices, dried or fresh rose petals – all optional (but great additions!)

To make the dressing, first toast the cumin seeds in a dry skillet until fragrant and lightly browned, a minute or two. Let cool, and grind to a powder with a mortar and pestle.

In a bowl or jar, whisk together the olive oil, lemon juice, honey, ground cumin, salt, and cayenne pepper. Set aside.

In a medium bowl, combine the carrots, chickpeas, dried pluots, mint, and almonds, and rose petals (if you’re including those as well.) Gently toss until everything is evenly coated. Serve immediately, or cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. (You can toss this salad, minus the almonds, hours in advance. Remove from the refrigerator 30 minutes before serving.)Pluots, apriums, apriplums, or plumcots, are some of the hybrids between different Prunus species that are also called interspecific plums. In the United States and Canada, these fruits are known by most regulatory agencies as interspecific plums. Wikipedia

Serves 6.

Adapted from Roots: The Definitive Compendium with more than 225 Recipes by Diane Morgan.
Prep time: 15 min

Post 246: Ein Yahav farmers began raising a new breed of Thai bean pods – They are extremely long and sweet taste. How does the Rambam define patience? What Rest at Tel Ha Shomir offers – Are we elligible for Betuach Leumi-National Insurance- Worldwide Tikkun HaKlali – November 22

Israeli farmers raising long beans! This is exciting. I am reminded of the vegetable stalls on Grand Street on the Lower East Side, overflowing with cabbages, bock joy, and all varieties of lettuce. When I had a studio at the Educational Alliance on East Broadway, in 2000-2002, I’d find legal parking and fill up the back seat of my car with the latest crop.

SPICY STIR-FRIED CHINESE LONG BEANS WITH PEANUTS

Pa-O Long Beans

Finding long beans is worth the effort — the high heat of the wok is just too much for green beans, which aren’t as hearty.

YIELD
Makes 4 servings
ACTIVE TIME
35 min
TOTAL TIME
45 min

INGREDIENTS

    • 1 1/2 lb Chinese long beans*
    • 1/2 cup unsalted dry-roasted peanuts (2 1/2 oz; not cocktail peanuts)
    • 2 teaspoons soy sauce or less
    • 2 to 3 small fresh Thai chiles** or spicy peppers (to taste), finely chopped
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt-can omit
    • 1 1/2 tablespoons peanut oil
    • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic
    • 1 large shallot, halved lengthwise, then very thinly sliced crosswise (1/2 cup)
    • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
    • Special equipment: a well-seasoned 14-inch flat-bottomed wok
    • Garnish: lime wedges

PREPARATION

    1. Cook untrimmed beans in a 6- to 8-quart pot of boiling salted water, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until just tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer with tongs to a large bowl of ice and cold water to stop cooking, then drain in a colander and pat dry with paper towels. Trim beans and cut crosswise into 3/4-inch pieces.
    2. Meanwhile, pulse peanuts in a food processor until about half of peanuts are finely ground and remainder are in very large pieces (do not grind to a paste).
    3. Stir together soy sauce, chiles, and salt in a small bowl.
    4. Heat wok over high heat until a bead of water dropped onto cooking surface evaporates immediately. Add oil, swirling to coat wok, then add garlic and stir-fry until garlic begins to turn pale golden, about 5 seconds. Add peanuts, and stir-fry until all of mixture is golden, about 30 seconds. Add beans, and stir-fry until hot and well coated, about 2 minutes. Remove wok from heat, then stir in soy sauce mixture and shallot, stirring until shallot has wilted. Drizzle in lime juice and season with salt, then transfer to a bowl. Serve warm or at room temperature.
    1. *Available at  Machana Yehuda market.
    2. **Also at  Local Markets
Cooks notes:
· Beans can be boiled, drained, and patted dry 3 hours ahead. · If you don’t have a wok, beans can be cooked in a 12-inch heavy skillet. (They will lack smoky flavor.)

By  the end of our stay at Hadassah Hospital Larry and I were chalishing for fresh vegetable. The second half of the post describes in detail the Heart Hospital at Tel Ha Shomer, where we chose not to park ourselves for five days.

  Ein Yahav farmers are offering to the public the freshest vegetables when fresh prevents the loss of nutritional value.

Ein Yahav farmers began raising a new breed of Thai bean pods that do not create gas in the digestive tract and thus solves one of the problems plaguing the enthusiasts of beans and their environment. Thai beans are very popular in Southeast Asia. The residents eat the pods with seeds in salads, steaming and cooking and also used for making desserts thanks to the natural sweetness. Thai beans grow by trailing to a large backpack/ support, whose length reaches 30 cm. The beans will mature to an attractive appearance without scuff marks and scars. Eating vegetables when fresh prevents the loss of nutritional value in the process of preservation or marinating so you can enjoy the content of proteins and vitamins. The new variety of beans became a hit among Thai workers Prairie, who can now enjoy their favorite foods from the land of origin . Even Ein Yahav farmer who tried the beans have reported a quiet night after dinner …

The Sheba Rehabilitation Hospital is Israel’s national center of rehabilitation. They offer long-term and life-long treatment and rehabilitation programs in areas such as orthopedics, neurology, respiratory, psychiatry, geriatric and trauma. They have the national responsibility for the long-term treatment and care of the most difficult and complex cases in Israel, such as injured soldiers and terror victims.
Pioneer and World leader in Rehabilitation Technologies
We are devoted to moving the rehabilitation field forward through research, education and the development of life-saving therapies and technologies. We are globally known for our specialized laboratories and centers where we develop innovative technologies in rehabilitation medicine, including Virtual Reality Training Facility, the Computerized Motion Analysis Laboratory, and the Isokinetic Laboratory.

They provide acute care, in-patient and outpatient rehabilitation. Our team of professionals works collegially with their patients, helping them to return to normal life as quickly as possible.

The Rehabilitation Hospital of the Sheba Medical Center has three divisions – Rehabilitation, Psychiatry, and Geriatrics. The Sheba Rehabilitation Hospital is also home to The National Multiple Sclerosis Center and the National Center for Spinal Cord Injuries.

Main treatment centers include:

• The Neurological Rehabilitation Department provides sub-specialized care for patients with head and spinal cord injuries, neurological diseases and, disorders.
• The “Steps” (“Tsa’adim”) Institute treats patients with mobility disabilities due to spinal cord or head injuries, stroke, peripheral nerve disorders or nerve damage, orthopedic injuries, amputations and more.
• The Head Trauma Rehabilitation Department treats people with an acquired brain injury (e.g. following accidents, stroke, trauma etc.), who require inpatient rehabilitation.
• The Orthopedic Rehabilitation Department uniquely provides surgical and rehabilitation services for a variety of conditions, including skeletal and bone injuries, amputations and diabetes-associated pain. They specialize in surgical limb amputation and prosthetic fitting of both upper and lower limbs.
• The Respiratory Rehabilitation Department provides a broad-spectrum of treatment options, aiming to successfully wean patients from mechanical ventilation as quickly as possible.
• The National Multiple Sclerosis Center is a multi-discipline holistic unit specializing in diagnosis, advanced treatment and rehabilitation of patients with MS and other neuro-immunologic diseases.
• The Eating Disorders Department is the only center of its kind in Israel. It offers outpatient services and hospitalization for adults (over 18) suffering from anorexia or bulimia.
• The Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Clinic treats people who have been sexually abused or physically assaulted, post traumatic IDF soldiers, and survivors of natural disasters, wars and terror attacks.

After much discussion, Larry and I decided to head for home.

Are You Patient – or Are You Procrastinating?

“Procrastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday.”

~ Don Marquis
Are You Patient – or Are You Procrastinating?
By Andrea Novakowski

Living in Israel has added to my life as a wife, former mathematics teacher,  grandmother, artist, designer, Hebrew and Arabic student, blogger and a Jewish text lover. And we are still in the best of times during Larry’s recovery.

How to  plan  my day is always tick, ticking in my head. Relax? I call jumping rope relaxing. Or a yoga class. Or developing a recipe.

Retired FOR THE PAST 14 years has meant that I can take advantage of any opportunities that comes my way, or I can turn  some or all of them down.

So what concerns do I have? The fact remains that I am not submissive and being a patient means being submissive, that the patient must wait for the therapist to arrive, is just a small part. As a well person, that would bother me. I need to remind myself that I have been OK with trusting Hashem to heal me of minor and major health issues.

However, my husband, who is recovering from surgery is A Ok with waiting. In fact, he is really A ok. We met his physical therapist today, Sivan. She offered us the 8 AM slot 2 x per week, when I requested mornings because Larry is energetic at that time. I answered yes for both of us.

What does the Rambam say about patience?

http://www.mishpacha.com/Browse/Article/4308/Steering-the-Middle-Course “The human psyche varies very much from one person to another, and one person’s character is far removed from another’s. I am one “Type”, moving, and my husband Larry is another “Type”, stable, stationary.

Some people are highly prone to anger; others are calm and perhaps get mildly angry once in many years. Some people are very arrogant; others are very meek. Some are dominated by strong cravings they are always seeking to satisfy; others are very pure of heart and do not crave even their physical necessities. Some are greedy and won’t be satisfied with all the wealth in the world; others deprive themselves; and still others squander all their wealth deliberately. And so it goes with all the other traits of character” (Hilchos Dei’os 1:1).
The Rambam is showing us a map of the human psyche, and it hasn’t changed a bit since his times. For better or worse, every one of us partakes of these traits in varying degrees and combinations. The Rambam then goes on to describe the proper way that a person is obligated to choose for himself:

“The proper path is the median measure in each trait; that is, the way that is equidistant from the two extremes. Accordingly, the early Sages directed that a person always aim for the middle way in order to attain perfection. How? He should not be an angry person whose temper is easily triggered, nor should he be like a dead man who feels nothing, but in the middle. He should not get angry except over an important matter that is worth getting angry about so that such a thing should not occur again…. Any person whose traits are at the midpoint is called wise.” (ibid. 2-4)
This middle way, in the Rambam’s view, is the “upright path” that Rebbi speaks of in Pirkei Avos, the way that is harmonious for the person himself and creates harmony with others. Others will surely admire his well-moderated conduct, based on inner balance between his various personality traits. Surely they will consider one who acts so wisely to be the perfect man.

Yes, the Torah is the one and only way for a person who wants to achieve perfection of character. But a person is given great freedom of action, and a broad field within which he must find his own personal Golden Mean. According to his own individual tendencies, he must strive for balance, always directing his conduct toward the middle, moderate way. Thus, in the Rambam’s view, our mishnah implies condemnation of extremism in personal and social behavior, while of course upholding the obligation to adhere to Torah principles.

So now we understand the theoretical peirush of the mishnah. A mode of conduct that strikes a moderate note is the wise and upright way that a person should strive for. But one problem has not yet been addressed, namely, how is a person to apply this principle of the Golden Mean in real life?
To illustrate the problem, let’s take one of the examples used by the Rambam himself. A person should not get angry, except in very rare instances. We all know that anger is a bad trait, including those of us who are subject to it. At the same time, however, the Rambam instructs us not to be like dead people, devoid of emotion.

So to a certain extent, one must use the trait of anger and become angry when the situation requires it, for instance, when one is in a parental role, or when one is a community leader who needs to restrain dangerous tendencies that are developing in society. The Rambam is saying, therefore, that no trait is to be beaten down completely, but rather each trait is to be used intelligently.
This is where the difficulty begins. How can a person know where to set the limits? We know how we operate. We’re on the road, and a driver passes us recklessly at a crossing. Angry words pop out of our mouth automatically, and we call him one of our favorite names. Is this the kind of situation the Rambam meant when he said that sometimes anger is the proper response? We don’t know.

All we know is that our defense mechanism will kick in to rationalize our outburst. (“Did you see what that idiot did? He almost caused a serious accident!”) We’re sure we’re right, of course, but is this the upright, middle way that Rabi Yehudah Hanasi teaches in Pirkei Avos?
Let’s be honest with ourselves. If we take a good look without distorting the truth, we’ll see how we justify whatever we do. It’s part of human nature. Anyone who is accused of any shortcoming has an answer. Whatever we do, we’re okay with it. This capacity for “being okay with it” comes from our ability to find justification for every act in the values accepted by society. And therefore, any path we feel like taking becomes the “upright way.” .

In other words procrastination is the flip side of stability. If the stable strong charachter is part of a persom’s midot, then this same persone may SEEM to procrastinate from a fixed position. For a person who seeks to be stationary, or that is his time to take action, but you’re not taking it.

How can you tell if you’re being patient or you’re just procrastinating? As I say, they often look the same from the outside. What’s taking place on the inside is a different story.

Patience Procrastination

 

What to do when you find yourself procrastinating. With patience, some part of your mind is still working on the task, even if you’re doing something else. With procrastination, your mind is avoiding the task, diverting your attention with unrelated activities like laundry and Facebook. You may not understand why you’re putting off your work. You just seem to be finding other things to do.

 

 

Below is information for National Insurance
Betuach Leumi JERUSALEM:
4 Ben Shatach
Fax: 02-6755691

SERVICES:

Payment & Bill Collection:
(for health insurance issues)

Sun, Tue, Thurs: 8:00-12:30
Mon: 15:00-17:00 only at 4 Ben shatach st.

Income Support:
Ben Sira Building Sun, Tue, Thurs: 8:00-12:30

Unemployment:
Ben Sira Building Sun, Tue, Thurs: 8:00-12:30

Pension:
Sun, Tue, Thurs: 8:00-12:30 only at 4 Ben shatach st.

Shim’on Ben Shatakh Street 4
Eligibility requirements for Bituach Leumi’s Long-Term Care Benefit
* Residing in the community – the benefit is intended only for elderly people living in their own home or in a retirement home (not in an institution).

* Income Test – eligibility for the benefit and its exact rate are determined through an Income Test. A person whose income is above the upper limit set by Bituach Leumi will receive only half the benefit, or none at all. In calculating the benefit, the spouse’s income is also taken into account (the long-term care benefit is not intended only for people in the low income range).

* The elderly person is not receiving the Sherutim Meyuchadim (special services) stipend from Bituach Leumi, or the Ezra L’azulat (helping others) stipend from the Ministry of Defense.

*The elderly person is found to be greatly dependent on others in performing daily living activities.

In cases where the individual’s functioning is temporarily impaired, the benefit will be provided for a limited period of time. Eligibility is determined by a “dependence evaluation”, conducted by an assessor from Bituach Leumi (usually a nurse or a physiotherapist) in a home visit.

The salary range for a job in this field could be from NIS 22 to 33.50 NIS per hour at an agency, plus benefits such as Bituach Leumi and pension. Privately, the range is 30-45 NIS, without those same benefits.

Matan Care
Matav.org.il
Goldman Agency
Urim
Dinah Care
Shvilhazav
Short term care from Bituach Leumi
People who need immediate short-term care (9.75 hours a week for up to 60 days) can request “short term care” from Bituach Leumi. This often occurs after a period of regular hospitalization (not rehabilitation), or hospitalization as a result of breaking an arm or leg or pneumonia with high fever. The applicant must submit the regular request form for Bituach Leumi’s long-term care benefit. A professional medical evaluation must be attached to the request form, and the claims clerk at Bituach Leumi will decide, according to the medical recommendation, whether the benefit will be given on a short-term basis. This form can be submitted through the hospital . Eligibility for the short term care benefit will be immediately effective upon returning home.

Benefit continued for 14 days during hospitalization
In the past, when an elderly person receiving the long-term care benefit was hospitalized, the benefit would be suspended until his release. However, a 1995 amendment to the Bituach Leumi Act specifies that an elderly person hospitalized in a hospital (excluding long-term care, rehabilitative and mental institutions) is entitled to the benefit during the first 14 days of his hospitalization. If he remains in hospital for more than 14 days, the benefit is suspended after this period of time, and renewed upon his release.

Degrees of Bituach Leumi’s Long-Term Care Benefit
The benefit is determined according to a score attained in Bituach Leumi’s dependence evaluation:

91%: 9.75 weekly hours for a person found to be dependent on others for most daily living activities, or needs supervision.

150%: 16 weekly hours for a person found to be dependent to a very large extent on the help of others for most daily living activities, most hours of the day.

168%: 18 weekly hours for a person who is completely dependent on others, to the maximum degree, and need aconstant supervision.

Addition of weekly hours for those eligible for the long-term care benefit who employ an Israeli caregiver

The National Insurance Institute has been providing extra care-giving hours to persons in the higher levels of dependence, eligible for the long-term care benefit , who employ an Israeli caregiver , and do not employ any foreign workers, according to the following criteria:

* A person dependent to a very large extent on the help of others for most daily living activities, most hours of the day, who currently receives 16 weekly care-giving hours will receive 3 extra care-giving hours a week.

* A person dependent to a very large extent on the help of others for most daily living activities, most hours of the day, who currently receives 8 weekly care-giving hours (because of his income) – will receive 1.5 extra care-giving hours a week.

* A person who is completely dependent on others for all daily living activities around the clock, or needs constant supervision, and currently receives 18 hours – will receive 4 additional care-giving hours a week.

* A person who is completely dependent on others for all daily living activities around the clock, or needs constant supervision, and currently receives 9 hours (because of his income) – will receive 2 additional care-giving hours a week.

Bituach Leumi has forwarded this information regarding additional hours to agencies that provide nursing services, and there is no need to officially request these extra hours.

Receiving the long term benefit in cash
aperson who is entitled to a long- term care benefit who employ a full- time caregiver (foreign or Israeli) for at least 12 hours a day for 6 days a week, under certain circumstances , can choose to receive their benefit in cash, and employ the caregiver privately. they can also choose to continue employing the caregiver with the manpower company.

In order to receive the long-term benefit in cash, the applicant must meet certain conditions: the caretaker must be over 18 years of age, and cannot be a relative of the recipient; the caretaker must be employed and paid wages, based on a written contract; the employer must have a permit to employ a foreign worker; and the worker must have a legal permit to stay in Israel.

A person who choose to receive the long term benefit in cash, can also recieve the other long term services such as- a presonal alarm unit, absorbent products, laundry services and visits to a day care center.

How to claim the long-term care benefit from Bituach Leumi
To receive the long-term care benefit from Bituach Leumi, you must fill out a claim for long-term care benefit form, and submit it to the claims clerk at the Bituach Leumi branch near your home. If you find it difficult to fill out the form you can get help from the claims clerk, the Counseling Service for the Elderly at the Bituach Leumi branch or a nursing care agency. The form must include a written medical opinion from the applicant’s physician. Proof of income documents must be attached.

It is a good idea to request, on the form, that the nurse’s home visit should be arranged with a member of the family.

The assessor visit to the home of the elderly person
It is very important that you or another family member who is aware of your elderly relative’s condition be present during the visit of the Bituach Leumi assessor.

When the assessor arrives, ask to see her Bituach Leumi worker’s identification.

It is essential to understand that Bituach Leumi’s long-term care benefit is given on the basis of the person’s level of functioning in daily living activities, rather than his overall health. It is therefore important to stress the difficulties experienced daily by your elderly relative.

The law defines eligibility for Bituach Leumi’s long-term care benefit based on the person’s independence at home only, and not outside. Thus mobility limitations outside the home are irrelevant. The dependence evaluation examines the person’s ability to dress, bathe, eat, use the bathroom and walk inside the home, as well as his need for supervision at home for his own safety (due to deteriorating memory or other psycho-geriatric conditions that endanger him or his environment).

Update – October 2014: A special committee of Bituach Leumi recommended that major changes be introduced into the dependency assessment of elderly individuals applying for a long-term care benefit. Based on these recommendations, the approach has been altered: the general identical evaluation process will be replaced by an individualized assessment for every applicant. In some cases, the person will not be required to demonstrate his abilities, and an interview will suffice. For instance, when a person confined to his bed or to a wheelchair reports that he/she is totally dependent on the assistance of others, and presents medical documents attesting to this condition, and the assessor arriving from Bituach Leumi receives the same impression, there will be no need for a physical test of functional capabilities.

According to the new approach, a demonstration will only be required when the degree of dependency cannot be construed from indirect observation of other activities. For instance: persons holding and presenting their medications will not be asked to demonstrate how they wash their hands with soap.

Deterioration
If the maximum long-term care benefit has not been granted by Bituach Leumi, and the elderly person’s condition deteriorates, you can contact Bituach Leumi and request a re-evaluation due to deterioration. This application must include the appropriate documents, confirming the deterioration in the person’s daily functioning.

Procedures for appeal when an application has been denied
1. Appeal – The appellant may appeal in writing , enclosing relevant documents, directly to one of three appeal committees operating in three main Bituach Leumi branches:

* The Haifa branch – for people residing in northern Israel

* The Ramla branch – for people residing in the central region

* The Beersheba branch – for people residing in the south of Israel

In this way one may appeal Bituach Leumi decisions regarding initial applications for long-term care benefits, as well as applications for increasing the allotted number of weekly home-care hours due to a deterioration in the elderly person’s condition. The appeal should be made as soon as possible after receiving the negative response from Bituach Leumi. (This is to prevent situations in which the committee decides that the applicant’s condition has worsened and requires him to submit a new application).

Please note: the three branches mentioned above receive appeals from many different places in their regions, and therefore the processing of appeals takes a long time. The Bituach Leumi does not place a time limit on the processing of appeals.

2. Repeated application – If an elderly person’s request for the long-term care benefit was turned down, and later his condition deteriorated, he may apply to Bituach Leumi for reavaluation. Medical documents attesting to this deterioration should be attached to the request. Social workers or nurses from the person’s Kupat Holim can be very helpful, and should be consulted.

3. Filing a complaint – complaints about the committee’s decision with regard to an elderly person’s entitement to the long-term care benefit may be submitted to the claims clerk in the local branch of Bituach Leumi, closest to his place of residence.

What services does the long-term care benefit include?
The following is a list of services available to recipients of the long-term care benefit l- as long as they can be provided in their home communities:

* The assistance of a home caregiver in daily living activities (dressing, bathing, eating, bathroom assistance, walking inside the home), managing the home, and needed supervision. The quota of hours can be exchanged for payment to a foreign worker who is legally employed to care for the person.

* One working hour of the caregiver = one weekly home care hour.

* Care in a Daycare Center for the Elderly: The person can visit a daycare center for up to 5 days a week. Optionally, the hours allowed by the benefit can be split between home care and days spent in the daycare center.

Services provided at the daycare center: bathing, supervision, recreational activities, hot meals and social interaction, as well as transportation to and from the daycare center.

* A day spent at the daycare center is equivalent to the following number of home care hours:

For a person entitled to 9.75 hours weekly: 2 home care hours = one day at the center.

For a person entitled to 16 or18 hours weekly: 2.75 home care hours = one day at the center.

There is also a small fee per day for meals, transportation etc.

* A supply of absorbency products such as adult diapers, absorbent pads, sheets, etc. These products are provided to the elderly person according to his needs, and delivered to his home once a month. The value of the products is determined individually for every person, vis-à-vis home care hours. Products may be ordered directly from companies listed by the Bituach Leumi. For further details press here.

* Laundry service: Laundry is taken from the person’s home and returned clean. Up to 5 kg is considered one laundry unit.

* Usually one laundry unit = about 1.25 home care hours.

* Emergency alarm button: The alarm button makes it possible for the elderly person to contact an emergency call center simply by pressing the button, 24 hours a day, even when away from home.

The call center can order the following for the subscriber: doctor, ambulance, fire department, home repairman, etc. Payment for these services is decided directly with the professional. The fee for an ambulance is the same as set by the health funds.

* The emergency alarm button = approximately ¼ of a weekly home-care hour.

The social worker in your local authority’s Social Services office determines, together with the elderly person and his relatives, which services they would like to use. In other words, the care program of your elderly relative is a joint decision. The social worker also establishes the contact between the elderly person and his family and the service providers.

Assistance before long-term care benefit is granted
This service makes it possible to have a caregiver at home right away, until assistance from Bituach Leumi is approved. The service is provided for a limited period of time, based on professional considerations. It is free of charge, at the expense of the home care agency. The agency can also assist you in applying to the Bituach Leumi.

http://www.familycare.co.il/index.aspx?id=3463&itemID=3293

On Mon, Nov 9, 2015 at 12:22 PM, Rachel Berger Rachel@nbn.org.il
[nefeshbnefesh] wrote:

We had a seminar two weeks ago on Aging in Israel, if you missed it live you can catch it online. I watched it and there was a great deal of information about prescriptions and interactions with over-counter medications.

Yehudit
judithepstein88@gmail.com
Alon Shvut

Worldwide Tikkun HaKlali – November 22 http://breslovcenter.blogspot.com/2015/11/worldwide-tikkun-haklali-november-22.html