Tag Archives: Persian New Year Noodle Soup Joan Nathan

Post 420: Did you know that the Smithsonian has Phyllis Diller’s 55,000 jokes collecting dust waiting to be transcribed. They are seeking volunteers to transcribe. https://seniorplanet.org/this-crowdsourcing-project-needs-your-sense-of-humor/?utm_source=Senior+Planet+Email+List&utm_campaign=9ad9ae45f4-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_02_13&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_7aaa498d1b-9ad9ae45f4-419030001&mc_cid=9ad9ae45f4&mc_eid=d35264408c – Take Time before Time Takes You (By Paul Carvel) with a Walking Tour of Nachlaot and making a SLOW cooking Persian New Year Noodle soup by Joan Nathan

Some unusual opportunities on line and in Jerusalem: Did you know that the Smithsonian has Phyllis Diller’s 55,000 jokes collecting dust waiting  to be transcribed? They are seeking volunteers to transcribe. Use the following link:

https://seniorplanet.org/this-crowdsourcing-project-needs-your-sense-of-humor/?utm_source=Senior+Planet+Email+List&utm_campaign=9ad9ae45f4-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_02_13&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_7aaa498d1b-9ad9ae45f4-419030001&mc_cid=9ad9ae45f4&mc_eid=d35264408c

Travel bloggers’ conference this week in Jerusalem

TBEX (Travel Blog Exchange), the largest conference and networking event for travel bloggers and online travel journalists, will this week assemble in Jerusalem for their first International Conference March 20-22, 2017, at the ICC Jerusalem International Convention Center.

The conference, which will bring together around 400 travel bloggers, writers, and industry professionals from around the world, is being held in partnership with the Jerusalem Conventions and Visitors Bureau (JCVB) under the direction of the Jerusalem Development Authority (JDA).

דער וואָס הערטפאַרגעסט, דער וואָס זעט – געדענקט, דער וואָס

טוט – פאַרשטייט

transliterated

der vo hert – fargest, der vos zet – gedenkt, der vos tut – farshteyt

the saying actually means

He that listens – forgets, he that sees – remembers, he that does – understands

Chaim Werdyger

You can know an area only by walking it. Do the Walking Tour of Nachlaot: Distance: almost 2 Km

 Time: 1¼-1½ hours-

Stopping to photograph will extend this tour, especially if you like to speak with passersby.

Difficulty: This is very easy walking on roads and alleys, and is suitable for wheelchairs and strollers. In fact, you will probably meet a lot of strollers on this walk!

Parking. There is a parking lot in the Clal Building on Kiah St (which means “All Ysrael Chaverim”) and also a parking lot opposite this on Kiah St.

Starting point: Start the walk at the junction of Agrippas St and King George, between the pizza store and falafel bar. The walk ends at the light rail station for Mahane Yehuda.

 Walk along Agrippas St, which is here a vehicle-free pedestrian walkway, and opposite the traffic circle turn right and enter Harav Haim Elboher Alley via the archway. Very soon you come to the sixth neighborhood built outside the Old City, Even Yisrael, constructed in the late 1870’s. Many of the houses here have a dilapidated look, as they have not undergone the renovations that typify much of Nachlaot. Nevertheless, few people know about this quarter and the square is a pleasant oasis of quiet just a short distance from bustling King George Street. Interesting photos with descriptions of some of the original inhabitants of Even Yisrael found on the right hand side of the tiled circle are worth viewing. 

 The grass courtyard. Standing in the far end is a building with a low blue door. This was the first Sephardic Orphanage founded in 1908.

 

  •  Exit the square by the alley on the far left (but not the exit to Jaffa St). Turn right onto Mashiya Baruchof St by the orphanage and peep down the first road on your left. The first door on the left is the non-used entrance to the synagogue Achdut Yisrael (the current entrance is round the back), which is the synagogue of former Lechi fighters of the underground movement. It is the only synagogue I know of that includes pictures of weapons as part of the interior decoration. It is not open during the week but is popular on Shabbat. Retrace your steps back along Mashiya Boruchof St and continue towards Agrippas St, passing by a row of restaurants.

  • Cross over the road and turn into Mishkanot St under the brick arch. (If there is a lot of traffic, it is safer to continue along Agrippas St and to use the pedestrian crossing at the intersection of Agripas St and Ki’ach St and then to turn back to Mishkanot St).

 On your right as you walk along Mishkanot St are the outer walls of houses of the Mishkenot Yisrael Quarter (Dwelling Places of Israel). This housing estate was erected in the 1870’s to 1880’s. You can peep into the courtyard of Mishkenot Yisrael from Berab Street, which is the first turning on your right.

 Continue along Mishkanot St and take the second turning on your right from Agripas St onto Rabbi Arye Street. At the end of this block you will come to the very modest home of Rabbi Aryeh Levin (1885-1969).

 Continue on Rabbi Arye St. past Shomron St. and you will see that you are walking past the outer walls of a second neighborhood, Mazkeret Moshe. Continue past the second-hand clothes store and turn right on Shirizli St.

 You are now in the courtyard of the Mazkeret Moshe Quarter, founded in 1882 by the Sir Moses Montefiore Testimonial Fund. The gallery, kindergarten and community center are later additions to the neighborhood and from an architectural perspective fit in rather poorly. Continue to the end of Shirizli St. and turn left onto Hakarmel St.

 Almost immediately you will see an archway and alley on your right that leads to Agrippas St. Turn down this alley and above the archway facing Agrippas St. you will see a memorial testimonial to Sir Moses Montefiore. Then turn back onto Hakarmel St.

 Continue on Hakarmel St. and pass the colorful face of the Hesed Verachamim Synagogue. This is fairly recent and shows the symbols of the 12 tribes, the lamp, the Torah, and words of the poem “A woman of valor who can find.” Continue past Mazqeret Moshe St. and head towards the courtyard of the third neighborhood, the Ohel Moshe Quarter. This was the Sephardi equivalent of the Ashkenazi Mazkeret Moshe Quarter. On the outer walls of the houses are photos and descriptions of families who who lived here. They are fascinating to read for a perspective on the people who lived here. At the edge of the courtyard, you can turn right onto Hahermon St. to look at another plaque to Sr Moses Montefiore on top of the archway facing Agrippas St.

 Now proceed in the other direction along Hahermon St., past the Beit Avraham and Ohel Sarah synagogues on your right and a serene garden on your left, and walk over the covered cisterns. There are more photos on the walls of the buildings, including one of the family of Yitzhak Navon who was President of the State of Israel from 1978 to 1983. He was a Sephardi who was born in this quarter, the fifth president of Israel, and the first president to be born in this country. Prior presidents were born in Russia.

At the end of Haherman St. turn left, and then first right onto Ohel Moshe St. One intersection before the end of the street, turn left onto Hagilboa St. and pass the Great Synagogue Ohel Moshe founded by Sir Moses Montefiore.

 Turn right on Mazqeret Mosheh St. and continue until the end of the road. In front of you is the Batei Broide Quarter which was established in 1903 for the poor. You might want to peep into the courtyard. The charter drawn up by Rabbi Brodie who spearheaded this project stipulated that the houses be used only by Torah scholars from the Perushim (anti-Hasidic) community.

 Now turn right on Hatavor St. At the end of Hatavor St, turn left onto Ezra Refael St. At the end of this street turn right onto Rama St., and then first left onto Shilo St.

 Turn into the first street on your right, which is Beer Sheva St. You are now in the beautiful Nahalat Zion Quarter. Immediately on the left is the famous Adas Synagogue of Aleppo. Walk through this beautiful neighborhood with its shrubs, trees and flowers in its central courtyard and surrounding houses.

 Continue to the very end of Beer Sheba St. and and follow the alley which curves to the right. Turn right opposite the Keter Torah Synagogue onto Givon St (which is not marked), and walk up the series of steps.

 Take the third street on the left – Ovadia Someach St. Look particularly for #11 in this very quaint street which is the Beit Yitzchak Synagogue. This is a Kurdish synagogue that was founded in 1894. If it is open for prayer services, it is worth taking a look inside. Otherwise look through the windows. Continue straight ahead to Agrippas St and turn right.

The famous Mahane Yehuda market (“the shuk”) is soon in front of you on the other side of the road. Cross Agrippas St. at the crossing just before Ezra Rafael St. After crossing this road, take the first left to a section of the covered market. You will pass a number of popular and reasonably priced restaurants. The Mahane Market synagogue is on the right just past the restaurants. This must be the only market in the world with a synagogue! The times of prayer are noted outside.

At the end of the street turn right and then turn left onto Etz Khayim St., the main thoroughfare of the covered part of the market. Yeshivah Etz Khayim began in 1908.

 Just before the end of this street, turn left into an alley between two vegetable/fruit stalls. You are now in the Georgian Market, so-called because the stalls are owned by people formerly from Georgia. There is a WC here. Follow the alley to the left and then take the first right and you will be on Machane Yehuda St. and the uncovered part of the market. Turn right and you will soon reach Jaffa St. The light rail stop for Mahane Yehuda is closeby on your left.

 More about walking tours; http://inandaroundjerusalem.com/

Now is a good time to start depleting your beans before Passover:

Persian New Year  Noodle soup https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/4988-persian-new-year-noodle-soup?action=click&module=Collection+Page+Recipe+Card&region=Recipes+for+Nowruz%2C+the+Persian+New+Year&pgType=collection&rank=21 by Joan Nathan

INGREDIENTS

FOR THE SOUP:

  • ¼ cup dried chickpeas

  • ¼ cup dried navy beans

  • ¼ cup dried red kidney beans

  • 14 cups cold water

  • 3 large onions, peeled and thinly sliced

  • 5 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed

  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil

  • 2 teaspoons salt

  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper

  • 1 teaspoon turmeric

  • ½ cup lentils

  • 2 cups beef broth/vegetable broth

  • ½ cup coarsely chopped chives or scallions

  • ½ cup chopped fresh dill

  • 1 cup coarsely chopped parsley

  • 6 cups fresh spinach, washed and chopped, or 3 cups frozen spinach, chopped

  • 1 fresh beet, peeled and diced in 1/2-inch pieces

  • ½ pound Persian noodles, available in Middle Eastern specialty food stores, or linguine, broken in half

  • 2 tablespoons wine vinegar or to taste

FOR THE GARNISH:

  • 1 onion, peeled and thinly sliced

  • 6 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

  • 1 teaspoon turmeric

  • ¼ teaspoon salt

  • ½ cup fresh mint, chopped

     PREPARATION
  1. Soak chickpeas, navy beans and kidney beans in 2 cups of water for 2 hours. Drain.

  2. In a large pot, brown the onions and garlic in the oil over medium heat. Add the salt, pepper, and turmeric, and saute for 1 minute more. Add the soaked beans and saute for 3 minutes, coating the beans with the oil and spices. Add the remaining 12 cups of water, and bring to a boil, skimming off the foam as it forms. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 45 minutes.

  3. Add lentils and beef broth, and simmer 50 minutes more.

  4. Add chopped chives or scallions, dill, parsley, spinach and the beet. Continue cooking, stirring occasionally, for 1 hour, or until beans are tender. Correct seasonings, and add more water if soup is too thick.

  5. Add noodles, and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

  6. Stir in the vinegar, and mix well.

  7. To prepare the mint garnish, brown the onions and the garlic in the oil in a small skillet. Remove from heat; add turmeric, salt and mint, and mix well.

  8. Ladle soup into the bowls, and top with the mint garnish.

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