Tag Archives: vegetarian

Post 438: Shavuot learning for women at Beit Avi Chai and the Rova Matnas,Trip with Women in Green Isru Chag Shavuot at Sinai Farm in Sussya- Leil Shavuot Shiur given by Rav Yaakov Moshe Poupko – Meeting for people who are Hard of Hearing- My raw food experiment- Almond paste spread

 

In Search of Truth Beit Avi Chai 11-4 AM 

Dr. Orit Avneryǀ Prof.

Elisheva Baumgarten

BilhaBen-Eliyahu

 
ǀ Prof.
YaaraBar-On
 
ǀ
Nir Baram
 
ǀ Dr.
Daniel Gordis
 
ǀ Rabbi
AmnonDokov
 
ǀ Prof.
Aviad Hacohen
 
ǀ Dr.
Aviva Zornberg
 
ǀ
Amichai Chasson
 
ǀ Prof.
Yoram Yovel
 
ǀ Prof.
Yerachmiel Cohen
 
ǀ
AmitSegal
 
ǀ
Nava Semel
 
ǀ Prof.
Avigdor Shinan
 
ǀ
Tzur Shezaf
and more…
 Free admission,subject toavailabilitySunday, June 4

Shavuot learning for women at the Rova Matnas on Misgav Ladach 20. In english. Midnight til 4am.
🌹 12-12:45am
Rabbi David Aaron. “Soul Torah: How to spiritually reboot.”
🌹 1am
Rabbi Gavriel Sassoon. “Kaballat HaTorah and mastering oneself.”
🌹 2-4am Rbzn Tziporah Heller.
2-3am Megillat Ruth
3-4am What you have to do to receive the Torah
Brought to you by the Ahavas Yisrael / Torah Tuesday Learning and Chesed Group.
🌹 We would appreciate volunteers to help set up and clean up. For info call 0547347926

Trip with Women in Green Isru Chag Shavuot at Sinai Farm in Sussya

On the day after Shavuot there will be an activity for the entire family at the Sinai Farm in Susiya, in South Hevron Hills. (See the attached Hebrew flyer)

Background on  Sinai Farm: In 1996, members of the family of Yair Har-Sinai, hy”d, and his wife Dalia Har Sinai and their nine children, decided to establish an agricultural farm on the outskirts of the community of Susiya, near Nahal Rahim. It is an agricultural farm that uses methods from the past and organic methods. A herd of sheep was established, as well as orchards, a vegetable garden and wheat fields. All of the hard work was conducted with the ideal of blending with nature, a modest, un- materialistic lifestyle and first and foremost, love for the Land of Israel.

For Jews to preserve the state’s lands was, in their eyes, a supreme  value and therefore they did the agricultural work and allocated more and more  plots of land to shepherding.

In 2008, Yair Har Sinai was murdered by Arabs from the area. His wife Dalia made the decision to continue their shared path, to continue developing and preserving the grazing areas and continuing the activities in the area of shepherding and producing cheese from their milk.

To the family tragedy of the father’s murder, was added the theft of 170 sheep from their pens in the middle of 2010, but even this did not break the vision of the family, which continues, together with friends, to work in the farm and develop it. On the day after Shavuot, as mentioned, an event will be held at the place for the entire family and it will be a good opportunity for the People of Israel to see with their own eyes, true love of the land and dedication. Details in the attached flyer. The main activities will be from 12 noon to 4:00pm. Entrance fee: 90 nis per family. 20 per person.

Yehudit Katsover 050-7161818  Nadia Matar 050-5500834

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#inbox/15c58d3b521c48cb?projector=1

Rav Yaakov Moshe Poupko’s lecture, “Yerushalayim:  From Conception to Resurrection ”, can be heard on Leil Shavuot, 1 AM, at the Mayanot Shul, 28 Narkis Street Nachlaot (close to Mircaz Ha”Ir).

Monday, June 5th

Support & Education for People who are HOH (Hard of Hearing) or Deaf and their families –Do you live with hearing loss? Have you felt isolated? Do you have trouble communicating with others- in person, or on the phone? You’re not alone! Facilitator:Ronnie Kaufman. 14:00 At AACI Glassman Family Center, 37 Pierre Koenig, Talpiot.

My recipe for almond spread is not like the smooth store bought one. Mine is not oily.

Almond paste/spread:

1 cup ground almonds + 4 brazil nuts

5 fresh chestnuts

1 tab Coconut oil-  mine had solidified.

1 Tab brown rice sypup

1 tab apple cider vinegar

1 tab poppy seeds

2 Tab of avocado

Instructions:

1-Put nuts into your food processor and run until pulverized.

2-Add the vinegar, brown rice syrup and coconut oil and continue blending.

3-Check on the consistency. It will start to hold together.

4-Add the poppy seeds Blend.

5-Add avocado. Mixture should now make a ball. 6-Refrigerate. Enjoy.

Roll:

( serve on the side: Red pepper, avocado, carrot,

פטרוזיליה סינית

 flakes mixed with brown brown rice syrup   Ingredients

1-spinach, kale, beet greens, additional herbs chopped fine, combined with orange sections and chilled in plastic bag. (my phone is not cooperating. Hence no photos)

2-rolled millet corn meal/ground almond, rolled between two sheets of baking paper chilled overnight.

Cut all vegetable for filling. save stalks of the beet greens and spinach for soup.

Roll out the chilled millet and corn almond meal.

Layer greens with orange section. Fold the sides together and pinch to close. Serve with mixed sesame seeds, Chinese parsley

פטרוזיליה סינית

flakes, brown rice syrup and orange juice sauce.

Serve also including almond spread inside the roll or on the side.

 

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Post 417:Hana Batista invites everyone to her Exhibition Opening Thursday March 9th, 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm Ginot Ha”Ir/Beit Yehudit see invitation below with further details. Come and support one of our artists! Pre-Purim Musical Event this Thursday! Three ingredient gluten free pie crust from bread! Traditional Gluten free pie crust for quiche

Hana Batista invites everyone to her Exhibition Opening Thursday March 9th, 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm Ginot Ha”Ir/Beit Yehudit see invitation below with further details.

Come and support one of our artists!

Leorah Parker – Jerusalem Artists Circle 🎨

To: Leorah Parker <lparkerartist@gmail.com>

I’ll be happy to see you all.
Hana – 02-672-7723
Obraz w treści 1

Pre-Purim Musical Event , today, Thursday!

Come join the community at Mirmor L’ David for an evening of ecstatic singing! We involve the audience in harmony and rhythm and create an awesome sound and feel with you together. Meaningful original songs with a folk-rock and funky feel and lyrics that reach out to the deepest and wild mysteries of Purim. Join us for a wonderful and unforgettable meaningful experience — with Levana ChajesAmalia SmallDjango ShankarKtoret ShalvaTohar Lauffer and Advah Lauffer.

Location:  Mizmor L’David  at the corner of Giladi and Efrata in the Mifal HaPayis building 

Date: Thursday March 9

Time:  8:30 pm

Suggested donation:  25 NIS

Yes, I have loads of gluten free flour and want to pass on some possible ways to use it:

If you have any Gluten Free Bread here’s an option:

3 Ingredient Gluten free Pie Crust:

3 INGREDIENT GLUTEN FREE PIE CRUST {DAIRY FREE}

A 3 ingredient gluten free pie crust recipe that’s easy to make with dairy free option. All you need are 3 healthy ingredients to mix the dough. A multipurpose gluten free pie crust that’s great for a quick meal, dessert, or baking dish. 

A 3 ingredient gluten free pie crust recipe that's easy to make and a dairy free. All you need are 3 healthy ingredients to mix the dough. A multipurpose gluten free pie crust that's great for a quick meal, dessert, or baking dish. This recipe has become a staple in our house for easy gluten free baking! Vegan Option

 

Be warned-I have not tried this one out. For me it’s a PURIM spoof.

A 3 ingredient gluten free pie crust recipe that's easy to make and a dairy free. All you need are 3 healthy ingredients to mix the dough. A multipurpose gluten free pie crust that's great for a quick meal, dessert, or baking dish. This recipe has become a staple in our house for easy gluten free baking! Vegan Option @udisglutenfree

First ingredient –> Coconut oil (softened) or Butter if you are not dairy free.

Second Ingredient –>  Whisked Egg.

Third and most IMPORTANT ingredient. The one that make this crust just plain AWESOME…drum roll please. —> Gluten Free Bread.

Optional and only if bread is too dry –> A few teaspoons of apple cider vinegar or juice (water works too if you must)

 

You see, this gluten free bread acts as the dough.

All you do is cut up the gluten free bread into cubes. The recipe calls for  about half a loaf of  Gluten Free White Bread.

Place it in a food processor. Blend, grind. Add in your whisked egg.

A 3 ingredient gluten free pie crust recipe that's easy to make and a dairy free. All you need are 3 healthy ingredients to mix the dough. A multipurpose gluten free pie crust that's great for a quick meal, dessert, or baking dish. This recipe has become a staple in our house for easy gluten free baking!

Add in your coconut oil (softened, not liquid). Blend again. Add a tiny bit of liquid ONLY if needed (Water, Juice, or Apple Cider Vinegar all work). Then press that little food processor button again to blend into a dough.

After you get the dough formed. Roll it up and place in the fridge. I think it works best once chilled.

Mmm k. Now you’re ready to roll. Literally. Just roll out the dough with a rolling pan. Place a sheet of plastic or parchment paper between the rolling pin and gluten free pie crust dough.

A 3 ingredient gluten free pie crust recipe that's easy to make and a dairy free. All you need are 3 healthy ingredients to mix the dough. A multipurpose gluten free pie crust that's great for a quick meal, dessert, or baking dish. This recipe has become a staple in our house for easy gluten free baking!

A TASTY GLUTEN FREE QUICHE.

A 3 ingredient gluten free pie crust recipe that's easy to make and a dairy free. All you need are 3 healthy ingredients to mix the dough. A multipurpose gluten free pie crust that's great for a quick meal, dessert, or baking dish. This recipe has become a staple in our house for easy gluten free baking! Gluten free quiche

A FRUIT HAND PIE.

A 3 ingredient gluten free pie crust recipe that's easy to make and a dairy free. All you need are 3 healthy ingredients to mix the dough. A multipurpose gluten free pie crust that's great for a quick meal, dessert, or baking dish. Like this gluten free hand pie!

AND GLUTEN FREE CURRIED LENTIL CHICKEN POT PIES.

Mini Gluten Free Chicken Pot Pies {Dairy Free}

 

Cotter Crunch

Serves 5-6

3 INGREDIENT GLUTEN FREE PIE CRUST {DAIRY FREE}

Super easy 3 Ingredient Gluten Free Pie Crust. A multipurpose Gluten free pie crust that’s great for a quick meal, dessert, or baking dish. Dairy free

Ingredients

    • 4 1/2 c cubed gluten free bread, gluten free sandwich bread. About Half a loaf. gluten free sandwich bread works best.
    • 1 whisked egg – 2 tab flax meal
    • 2 tbsp 1 tsp coconut oil (softened not melted) or butter sliced
    • 1/2 tbsp water or juice (acv) if needed Optional if bread is too dry when grinding
  1. Cut your bread into cubes.
  2. Place it in a food processor. Blend, grind, until more a bread meal texture is formed.
  3. Add in your whisked egg. Pulse a few times.
  4. Add in your coconut oil (softened, not liquid). Blend again. Add a tiny bit of liquid ONLY if needed (Water, Juice, or Apple Cider Vinegar all work). Then press that little food processor button again to blend into a dough.
  5. After you get the dough formed. Roll it up and place in the fridge. I think it works best once chilled for at least 2-3 hours.
  6. Just roll out the dough with a rolling pan. Place a sheet of plastic or parchment paper between the rolling pin and gluten free pie crust dough.
  7. Roll into 1/8th in to 1/4 in crust.
  8. This amount of crust will make enough for 6 hand pies and a pot pie.
  9. If you want to make a gluten free pie crust (9 inch), a little over half a loaf bread should work for the dough. But I would Make 2 batches and then combine dough in case you need extra patching up the pie crust. You can freeze the rest. There will be extra to hang over the pie plate to crinkle crust. Make sure to pierce the bottom with a fork.
  10. Gluten Free pie crust bakes at 350F for 30-40 minutes. Pre bake 10 minutes before filing it.
  11. Hand pies bake faster.
  12. Baking times depend on your oven type of bread, so check at 30 minutes

Gluten free using flour mixture-recipe for one crust

  • 184g King Arthur Gluten-Free Multi-Purpose Flour or 5 3/4 ounces brown rice flour blend* or your own mixture
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 teaspoons Instant ClearJel(optional; not packed in a gluten-free facility)or fish gel. available in Israel
  • 1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 85g cold butter
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice or vinegar
  • *See recipe for this blend below.

Instructions

  1. Lightly grease a 9″ pie pan.
  2. Whisk together the flour or flour blend, sugar, Instant ClearJel, flax meal/xanthan gum, and salt.
  3. Cut the cold butter into pats, then work the pats into the flour mixture until it’s crumbly, with some larger, pea-sized chunks of butter remaining.
  4. Whisk the egg and vinegar or lemon juice together until very foamy. Mix into the dry ingredients. Stir until the mixture holds together, adding 1 to 3 additional tablespoons cold water if necessary.
  5. Shape into a ball and chill for an hour, or up to overnight.
  6. Allow the dough to rest at room temperature for 10 to 15 minutes before rolling.
  7. Roll out on a piece of plastic wrap, on a silicone rolling mat, or in a pie bag that’s been heavily sprinkled with gluten-free flour or flour blend. Invert the crust into the prepared pie pan.
  8. Fill and bake as your pie recipe directs.
  9. *Make your own blend
    The following make-at-home blend, featuring stabilized brown rice flour, works pretty well when substituted; and it tastes better than a blend using regular brown

    1. rice flour.Whisk together 6 cups (28 1/2 ounces) King Arthur stabilized brown rice flour; 2 cups (10 3/4 ounces) potato starch; and 1 cup (4 ounces) tapioca flour or tapioca starch. Store airtight at room temperature. Note: You can substitute white rice flour for the brown rice flour if you like; it’ll make your baked goods grittier (unless you manage to find a finely ground version).

     

    TIPS FROM  BAKERS

    • The egg yolk makes this crust vulnerable to burned edges, so always shield the edges of the crust, with aluminum foil or a pie shield, to protect them while baking.
    • To pre-bake without filling, preheat the oven to 375°F. Line the bottom with pie weights, and bake for 25 minutes. Remove the weights, and bake for an additional 10 to 15 minutes, until the crust is a light golden brown.
    • Making fruit pie? Apply strong heat to the bottom crust at the beginning of the baking time to prevent sogginess. For best results, use a metal (aluminum preferred) pie pan. Bake at 425°F on the bottom rack of your oven for 20 minutes, then reduce the heat to 350°F, move your pie to the middle rack, and continue to bake until the crust is golden and the filling is bubbly.
    • If you’re baking a custard pie in this crust, we recommend pre-baking as directed above, then cooling the crust until you can touch it comfortably before pouring in the custard. Bake the custard-filled pie at the moderate heat such pies require; your recipe will indicate what that is. Don’t forget the pie shield for this second bake as well.
    • The top of a double-crust pie will brown OK; but brushing it with milk and sprinkling it with sugar will enhance its browning, and add sparkle and sweet crunch to your pie.
    • For an egg-free crust, substitute 4 tablespoons cold water for the egg and lemon juice (or vinegar). If necessary, stir in additional cold water, a teaspoon

Post 385: Remember Double Dutch? If I were in NYC I’d be at the Finals : http://www.nationaldoubledutchleague.com/ However, what causes hand swelling during exercise? This can be an occasional problem connected to exercise, endurance athletes develop hyponatremia (hi-poe-nuh-TREE-me-uh) — an abnormally low level of sodium concentration., Simple Pumpkin Soup with 7 ingredients

http://www.nationaldoubledutchleague.com/ DAVID A. WALKER, FOUNDER – LAUREN WALKER, PRESIDENT NDDL 25th Annual David A. Walker Double Dutch Holiday Classic, Sunday December 4th, 2016 –

In NYC this Sunday-the show will be a blast. Skipping rope is my sport.

With fewer New Yorkers practicing double dutch jump rope, an annual tournament at the Apollo Theater in Harlem will draw teams from France and Japan.

Perhaps you’ve experienced the following: Hand swelling during exercise?

Question: People have complained while  walking several times a week, that their fingers get puffy to the point that they can’t remove rings.

Answers from Edward R. Laskowski, M.D.

Hand swelling during exercise is a fairly common problem. The cause isn’t completely clear, but hand swelling appears to be a result of the way your body and blood vessels respond to the increased energy demands of your muscles during exercise.

Exercise increases blood flow to your heart and lungs, as well as to the muscles you’re working. This can reduce blood flow to your hands, making them cooler. In turn, the blood vessels in your hands may react by opening wider — which could lead to hand swelling.

As you continue to exercise, your muscles generate heat that makes your system push blood to the vessels closest to the surface of your body, to dissipate heat. This response triggers perspiration and may also contribute to hand swelling.

Sometimes, endurance athletes develop hyponatremia (hi-poe-nuh-TREE-me-uh) — an abnormally low level of sodium concentration. Swollen fingers and hands may be a sign of hyponatremia, but other signs, such as confusion and vomiting, are more prominent than is swelling. Drinking too much water, particularly during a marathon or similar long, strenuous event, may cause your body’s sodium to become so diluted that you become hyponatremic. Hyponatremia requires immediate medical attention.

There’s no proven way to prevent or reduce most exercise-related hand swelling, but these tips may help ease discomfort:

  • Remove your rings and loosen your watchband before exercise.

  • Perform occasional forward and backward arm circles during exercise.

  • Stretch your fingers wide and then make fists several times during exercise.

With

Edward R. Laskowski, M.D.

SIMPLE PUMPKIN SOUP

SIMPLE Pumpkin Soup with Sesame Kale Topping #vegan #glutenfree

It’s almost that time of year when I start wearing a scarf inside (yes, I said it – inside), drinking more hot tea than water, and cozying up to soups in the evening. For such occasions, I have the perfect simple, fall-appropriate recipe for you:

7 ingredient Pumpkin Soup made completely from scratch!

How to Roast Sugar Pumpkins!

It all starts with sugar pumpkins.

How to Roast a Pumpkin!Do it Yourself Pumpkin Puree! So simple and SO delicious

Roasting the pumpkin is the only part of this recipe that takes any length of time. And once it’s done, this soup comes together fast! Plus, it requires just 7 ingredients you probably have on hand:

Pumpkin
Coconut milk
Maple syrup
Salt, black pepper, cinnamon + nutmeg
Veggie stock
Shallot
Garlic

The kale-sesame topping it also easy, requiring just 5 ingredients. It adds a nutritious, colorful touch to this soup along with a little extra staying power. Your friends will be so impressed.

7 Ingredient Savory Pumpkin Soup! #vegan #glutenfreeHEALTHY 7 Ingredient Pumpkin Soup! #vegan #glutenfree

You guys are going to love this soup. It’s

 

It’s also customizable! If you don’t have the ingredients for a kale-sesame topping, sub garlic croutons or vegan parmesan. This soup makes a delicious light lunch or dinner, and would be perfect served alongside hummus and toast or a hearty salad.

Kale Sesame Saute!SIMPLE Pumpkin Soup with Sesame Kale Topping #vegan

@minimalistbaker on Twitter, or #minimalistbaker on Instagram. We absolutely love seeing what you guys cook up. Cheers!

AMAZING 7 Ingredient Pumpkin Soup #vegan #pumpkin #glutenfreeSIMPLE Pumpkin Soup with Sesame Kale Topping #vegan #glutenfree #pumpkinSIMPLE 7 Ingredient Savory Pumpkin Soup #vegan #glutenfree

 
SIMPLE PUMPKIN SOUP
Prep time
15 mins
Cook time
1 hour
Total time
1 hour 15 mins
A simple, 7 ingredient pumpkin soup that’s savory and made completely from scratch! Healthy, satisfying, and perfect for chillier weather.
Author: Minimalist Baker
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Vegan, Gluten Free
Serves: 3-4
Ingredients
SOUP
  • 2 sugar pumpkins (~2 1/4 cups (450 g) pumpkin puree)
  • 2 shallots, diced (~1/4 cup or 40 g)
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced (1 1/2 Tbsp or 9 g)
  • 2 cups (480 ml) vegetable broth
  • 1 cup (240 ml) light coconut milk (or sub other non-dairy milk with varied results) such as creamy soy milk.-I add  as I heat the smooth mixture
  • 2 Tbsp (30 ml) maple syrup or agave nectar (or honey if not vegan)- not needed
  • 1/4 tsp each sea salt, black pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg
GARLIC KALE SESAME TOPPING (optional)
  • 1 cup (67 g) roughly chopped kale
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 2 Tbsp (18 g) raw sesame seeds
  • 1 Tbsp (15 ml) olive oil
  • pinch salt
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (176 C) and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Using a sharp knife, cut off the tops of two sugar pumpkins and then halve them. Use a sharp spoon to scrape out all of the seeds and strings (see notes for a link to roasting seeds).
  3. Brush the flesh with oil and place face down on the baking sheet. Bake for 45-50 minutes or until a fork easily pierces the skin. Remove from the oven, let cool for 10 minutes, then peel away skin and set pumpkin aside.
  4. To a large saucepan over medium heat add 1 Tbsp olive oil, shallot and garlic. Cook for 2-3 minutes, or until slightly browned and translucent. Turn down heat if cooking too quickly.
  5. Add remaining ingredients, including the pumpkin, and bring to a simmer.
  6. Transfer soup mixture to a blender or use an emulsion blender to puree the soup. If using a blender, place a towel over the top of the lid before mixing to avoid any accidents. Pour mixture back into pot.
  7. Continue cooking over medium-low heat for 5-10 minutes and taste and adjust seasonings as needed. Serve as is or with Kale-Sesame topping.
  8. For the Kale-Sesame topping: In a small skillet over medium heat, dry toast sesame seeds for 2-3 minutes, stirring frequently until slightly golden brown. Be careful as they can burn quickly. Remove from pan and set aside.
  9. To the still hot pan, add olive oil and garlic and sauté until golden brown – about 2 minutes. Add kale and toss, then add a pinch of salt and cover to steam. Cook for another few minutes until kale is wilted and then add sesame seeds back in. Toss to coat and set aside for topping soup.

Post 383: Chanuka experience to visit tombs of the Macabees and their father Mathysahy , Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake to celebrate

Join  a unique Chanuka experience following  in the footsteps of the Macabees in the Modiin region. 

The tour begins with a 360 degree panoramic lookout from Nebi Samuel (Shmuel Hanavi) from where Yehuda HaMacabee launched his heroic battle for the freedom of Jerusalem.

 

The group will continue to modern Modiin to explore recent archaeological sites and their possible connection to ancient Modiin. 

After  break for lunch  enjoy a visit to the tomb of the Macabees and their father Matityahu.

 

A Chanuka journey can’t be complete without “olive oil” and  a stop by the olive oil factory at B’nei Darom.  

I don’t know the Kashrit level of the Olive Oil. 

Where: depart and return to the Inbal Hotel.  The bus will depart from the side street to the right of the hotel when standing in front facing the lobby.

When:  Monday26 December – 26 Kislev – 9:30 – 16:00

Please note: Departure will be on time!

Cost: 165 NIS per participant of any age – all entry fees included.

Payment is due in cash only – 20 minutes prior to boarding.

Please bring the exact amount.

Reservations:  

hillel.leib@gmail.com

Don’t delay in booking your seats.

We are generally sold out, B”H.

 

What to bring/wear? 

Lunch, snacks, water.  Bring your favorite salad or sandwich and more.

Tissues are often helpful when traveling around Israel for bathrooms that might not have. Good walking shoes.

 

Tour is geared for adults including seniors or teens ages 12 and up.

 

Notes:  departure and arrival times are approximate and depend upon several factors including holiday traffic; itinerary, guide and speakers subject to adjustment without prior notice; your reservation is a firm commitment and cannot be cancelled within 48 hours of departure; security will be provided.

Chag Chanukah Sameach!  

Ufaratzta:  Exploring & Celebrating the Kedusha of Eretz Israel   

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake Can Really Taste Great!

20161122_074123.jpg

The version above was my first at scratch attempt at Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake. I eliminated the cream toping.

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

 

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

 

I used tapioka flour, rice flour and potato starch to make the cake, but there are so many flours and starches you can use. It’s okay if you use white or whole wheat flour or other gluten flour. If you’re a celiac or follow a gluten free diet and you prefer to use other flours, you should  consult beflow A guide to  gluten free flours to know what flours you can use instead. If you use other flours and the batter is too thick, add more liquid and if it’s too liquid, add more flour. 

The first was the case with the [ackage mix that I bought.

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

If you can’t find the chocolate hearts, don’t worry, there are so many things you can use instead, like chocolate chips, candy, fruit, chocolate syrup, nuts, seeds, or your favorite foods.

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

Many people avoid extra virgin olive oil to make sweet recipes because it has an intense flavor, but I love it,  although there are many oils you can use. Avoid refined oils please, they’re so unhealthy.

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

 

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

I’ve been using carob powder combined with cocoa powder and it tastes so good and is also healthier, but I prefer cocoa powder, I LOVE its flavor, although carob powder is a great choice and is caffeine-free.

To replace the eggs you can use mashed bananas as I did or applesauce, chia or flax seeds, pumpkin puree, tofu or any other egg replacer.

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

 

Vegan Gluten Free Chocolate Cake

This vegan gluten free chocolate cake is great for birthdays or any special occasion, although it’s so delicious you don’t need any reason to make it.
Author: Simple Vegan Blog
Recipe type: Dessert
Cuisine: Vegan, Gluten Free
Serves: 8

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup rice flour (140 g)  or
  • 1 cup tapioka flour-which I used
  • ½ cup one kind of potato  stach (100 g)
  • ½ cup another kind of potato starch (110 g)
  • ½ cup carob or unsweetened cocoa powder (50 g)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 2 bananas
  • 1 cup orange juice (250 ml)
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil (125 ml)
  • ¼ cup agave syrup (85 g)
  • dried or frozen blueberries
  • ½ cup coconut sugar (70 g)
  • Vegan whipped cream omitted
  • Chocolate hearts omitted

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat the oven at 180 ºC or 355 ºF. Grease the sides of a cake pan with oil. Place a sheet of parchment paper on the bottom of the cake pan (I use a cake pan with removable bottom, but it’s not necessary).
  2. Combine the dry ingredients in a bowl (teff flour, rice flour, potato starch, carob powder, baking soda and baking powder). Mix well.
  3. Place the rest of the ingredients in a blender (bananas, orange juice, oil, agave syrup and coconut sugar). Blend until smooth.
  4. Combine the dry and wet ingredients and pour the mixture into the cake pan.
  5. Bake for 25 or 30 minutes. Let cool the cake before un molding.
  6.  Frost the cake with the whipped cream and decorate with the chocolate hearts.

    GLUTEN FREE FLOURS AND HOW TO USE THEM I hate to break it to you: Gluten free flours aren’t like gluten.

    Now that we have that out of the way, here’s why they aren’t like gluten:

    1. When using gluten free flours, you have to use at least two different flours. When you used to cook with gluten, you could just dump in some of your whole wheat flour and call it good. Gluten free flours are a bit more temperamental. They don’t do well by themselves. I usually use about 1 cup of starch for every two cups of rice flour, but this depends upon the recipe.
    2. Besides using a few different flours, you’re going to have to use some sort of “gum” or gum substitute to hold everything together. I usually use either xanthan gum or guar gum. The proportions vary, but I tend to use about 1 teaspoon for every 2 cups of flour.or an egg substitute. I used flax meal and the result was satisfactory.

    Below is a chart on gluten-free flours and their consistencies. These certainly aren’t all of the flours out there, but they are the ones I use most often.

    Flour: About: Texture: Substitutes:
    Rice Flour Rice flour is the flour I use most in gluten free baking. Rice flour can sometimes have a rather gritty taste, however, so it has to be mixed with starches. I generally use brown rice flour but if you insist on white rice flour I’m not complaining. Brands we use are: Lundberg, Bob’s Red Mill. Gritty Can usually be exchanged with sorghum flour and oat flour.
    Corn flour I do not use this flour very often, yet it can sometimes substitute for rice flour if I don’t have any at the time. You can also use it in corn breads. gritty Can be exchanged with any of the ‘gritty’ flours.
    Cornmeal This is not really flour. I use it for corn breads and for the surface pans sometimes (Cornmeal on the surface of the pan will cook into the dough and give it a nice crunchy crust). Gluten-Free cornmeal can usually be found at the local grocery store; just be sure to check the label. very gritty. Cannot be exchanged.
    Oat flour Oat flour is one of my favorite flours. It has a nice consistency and makes very good baked goods. I have lately been using oat flour quite a lot because it seems to work better than most other gluten-free flours. Since gf oat flour is expensive, I grind oats in a coffee grinder instead. If you use that method, don’t use the oat flour in cakes or other delicate baked goods.Finely ground oat flour works really well, so if you can get your hands on some of that for a reasonable price, do so.

    Some celiacs are sensitive to oats, so this might not be the best flour for you. You can replace rice flour for oat flour in pretty much every one of my recipes though.

    gritty Can be exchanged with millet flour, rice flour, or sorghum flour.
    Buckwheat flour I don’t use this flour very often because of its coloring, yet it has a good taste and could replace rice flour. Again, be careful about the gluten, and be sure to thoroughly check the label. gritty Cannot be exchanged
    Cornstarch I use cornstarch the most of all the starches, simply because it can be found easily at the local grocery store. Be sure to check the label for gluten-free. Though commonly used as a thickener, cornstarch is a surprisingly good gluten-free flour. It has a nice, fluffy consistency. You do have to use rice flour or some other gritty flour with the cornstarch in order to balance it. Used alone, the results are usually dry and tough and flavorless with an unpleasant mouth feel. starchy and fluffy. Can be exchanged with tapioca or potato starch in gluten-free baking unless stated otherwise in the recipe, but it cannot be replaced in sauces and in some pies. Tapioca and potato starch will form gummy lumps, whereas cornstarch will only thicken a sauce.
    Potato starch Potato starch can create a rather gummy consistency if it is used alone in a recipe. However, mixed with rice flour or some grainy flour it adds pleasant fluff. Note: Do not confuse potato starch with potato flour. They are very different things, believe me. I never use potato flour because it tastes bad and doesn’t work very well. Starchy, (difficult to distinguish between cornstarch and tapioca.) Can be exchanged with cornstarch or tapioca starch except in sauces and sometimes pies.
    Tapioca starch Tapioca starch is commonly used with potato starch in my recipes. It, like cornstarch and potato starch, can’t be used alone in a recipe—it needs rice flour, oat flour, or another gritty flour to balance it out. starchy Can be exchanged with potato starch or cornstarch except in sauces and sometimes pies.
    Sorghum flour Sorghum has a good flavor, and can replace several of the other gritty flours. It tastes good in breads. I wouldn’t use it alone with nothing but starches though. Probably a combo of sorghum with rice, oat, or millet flour. gritty Can be replaced with rice flour, oat flour, or millet flour.
    Millet flour Has good flavor, and a consistency rather like corn flour. It could replace several of the other gritty flours, especially if you want to produce a more “whole grain” flavor in the baked good. gritty Can be replaced with sorghum flour, corn flour, or rice flour.
    Teff flour Teff flour should only be used in small quantity because of its color and the fact that too much of it just plain tastes bad. It has a nice taste when used in moderation and gives a multigrain flavor to most breads. gritty This flour can be replaced by rice flour. When replaced, rise and consistency of the baked good will not be changed. The taste and color, however, will be slightly changed, though not usually in a bad way.
     Almond flour/Almond Meal To avoid confusion right off, the difference between almond meal and almond flour is that in almond flour, the almonds are ground without the skin, whereas almond meal is ground with the skin. This small difference doesn’t seem to affect the baked goods though.This flour is still in the testing stage for me. It’s used a lot in paleo baked goods, and I’ve used it by itself before. The results are always a little gritty and sometimes a bit too moist (to the point of being heavy and gummy), since almond flour contains a lot of moisture. I have used it in cakes in small quantity with rice flour and starch with good results.  Gritty but adds moisture to baked goods.  Can’t be exchanged.

    Obviously, they don’t contain that “stretchy” quality that gluten can produce in your dough. The most noticeable difference between gf flours and gluten can be seen in bread dough. If you try to make bread the gluten way, you’re going to fail and cry and probably need counseling before you can be happy again

     

    Second cake:

    GLUTEN-FREE CHOCOLATE ZUCCHINI CAKE OR CUPCAKES-Have not tried this one yet!

    This is a great way to use up all those overgrown garden zucchinis. Who knew that mashed up green vegetables could taste so good?

    CHOCOLATE ZUCCHINI CAKE/PUMPKIN

    Serves: 10

    Time: 30 minutes active, 45 minutes cooking.

    Cream Together- I will be doubling the quantities

    and weighed out as well  the zucchini and pumpkin  

    1 stick (½ cup) butter, soft but still cold or 1/4 cup commercial soy milk + l/4 cup olive oil

    1 2/3 white granulated sugar or less by 1/3 = 5/3X1/3=5/9 : 5/3=15/9-5/9 = 10/9 = 11/9 cup sugar or slightly more that 1 cup sugar

    Add and beat well:

    2 large eggs or 1 egg and 1/2 cup of flax meal

    Add and beat in:

    3/4 cup rice flour

    1/4 cup almond flour/ walnut flour

    ½ cup cornstarch (check label for gluten-free)

    1 cup pureed fresh zucchini (I use our electric mixer)

    ½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder (try dutch cocoa for extra-dark chocolate yumminess!)

    ¾ teaspoon xanthan gum-omitted

    ¼ teaspoon salt

    1 teaspoon baking powder

    Beat until well-blended and smooth. You can use a greased 8×8” square baking pan, a 9” round one, or a 12 cupcake pan with waxed paper cupcake holders. Bake at 350 degrees F for 40-45 minutes.

    Makes 1 cake or 12 cupcakes. I doubled he recipe and make 12 – 75 gram cupcakes with an additional 1/8 cup of vegetables mixed in. Also added blueberries and chocolate bits. Since I double the recipe, my cupcakes are larger and made 14.

    I want to make a batch of pumpkin and another of zucchini, I prepared 4 cups of the dry ingredients.

  7. .

Post 348: Developments in Mircaz Ha”Ir and 10 claimed health benefits of bottle gourd or lauki

 

Where do you park your car? In an underground mall in oily crud on the ground? Only in Jerusalem would you have the privilege  of parking in an olive grove in the center of the city.

20160908_064742.jpg These are very old olive trees. My guess is that they were brought to Gan Ha Atzmaot and incorporated into the landscape or they were part of the area before the park was developed.

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These immense planters were developed by Muslala. They are a group of urban “gorillas” out to transform the corner of Kikar Davidka and Rechove Yaffa into an artist’s work space. 20160905_085540.jpg   

This tree stump was found in the remains of the Russian Compund during construction. Muslala turned it into a drinking faucet. Actually, the separate pieces were constructed on the of Binyan Klal, the building that has become Muslala’s space. 

Come join in Yoga 50+ at the mirpeset in Binyan clal! This is a gentle yoga class, with a lot of movement synchronized with breath, breathing exercises, postures and deep relaxation. You don’t have to be 50+ to participate, the class is suitable to anyone wanting gentle yet effective yoga. The class is on Sundays at 4:30 pm. During September, the first class has a special introductory price of 20 NIS.

The Mirpeset is a new, fantastic space created by the Muslala group, as part of their efforts to revitalize Binyan clal. There is a lot of activity there, and definitely worth checking it out. Studio Prizma there offers a wide variety of movement classes.

Ruthi Soudack, the instructor, has been practicing yoga for over 30 years, and teaching since 1993. She combines a number of approaches to yoga in her classes. Ruthi also offers private yoga lessons and therapeutic sessions, as well as group classes at her magical home in Ein Karem.

The Terrace: A Roof For New Urbanism

The Terrace – called the Mirpeset in Hebrew – is situated in the Clal building at the top of the spiral stairs. The goal of the Terrace is to develop the space for public use on the topics of art, sustainability and community, and to breathe life into the Clal Building and the surrounding areas.

As the new home of Muslala, the Terrace has a multi-purpose central space designed for leisure, gatherings and events. Surrounding the central space are six other spaces, each with its own purpose:

  • Adamahi – for sculpting and building with earth
  • Gag-Eden – all about urban agriculture, renewable energy and sustainable thinking
  • Propolis – learn about the biodynamic approach to urban beekeeping
  • Prizma – the space for movement, body and meaning
  • Mirpeset Gallery – for public art exhibitions
  • Library and study space

A variety of courses, workshops and lectures led by the Muslala community members take places in the different Terrace spaces.

How to find the Terrace: In the Clal Building at 97 Yaffo St. go to the top of the spiral stairs, or to floor E by elevator.

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10 claimed health benefits of bottle gourd or lauki :

from conscious health net.

I peeled this vegetable and removed the seeds. There was very little left after that. I added it to a pressure cooker with butternut squash, sweet potatoes, sliced onion, vegetable broth, powdered mustard, roasted garlic, sriracha sauce, cayenne pepper, grated ginger and steamed briefly. Afterward the pot cooled I peeled the other vegetables  and blended the soup in my food processor.

 

conscious health.net recommended using thermogenic spices like ginger, cayenne or drink the lauki or bottle gourd juice for weight loss.

About bottle gourd/lau/lauki:

This South Asian squash is indeed bottle shaped, light green and long. The flesh inside is spongy and you can also cut it into small pieces and make a curry out of it. Bottle gourd or lauki is over 90% water therefore it is easy to digest.

Asserted Ayurvedic health benefits of bottle gourd/lau/ lauki: These points are not mine but recommendations fom the site concsious health.net

  1.  recommends cooked lauki or bottle gourd for better digestion. It is cooling, calming, diuretic and anti-bilious.
  2. Like cranberries, bottle gourd or lauki supports the urinary system of our body by reducing burning sensation from high acidic urination. It also reduces the chances of urinary infection because it is alkalizing and has a diuretic effect.
  3. It contains many vitamins and minerals, such as, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, Vitamin A, C and folate.
  4. It is extremely popular for weight loss. Especially the bottle gourd or lauki juice.
  5. Bottle gourd is extremely popular for reducing high blood pressure and keeping your heart healthy/
  6. Lauki or bottle gourd is known to combat excessive thirst in diabetic patients.
  7. The fiber and the minerals in the bottle gourd or lauki supports healthy digestion and combats flatulence and combats constipation.
  8. In Ayurveda it is also know to prevent premature greying.
  9. Lauki or bottle gourd juice with a pinch of sea salt maintains the electrolyte balance in the body. This is also a great remedy for people who has diarrhea.
  10. Bottle gourd is recommended by Ayurvedic doctors for reducing liver inflammation.

Post 343: August 25,2016 Thursday,8 to 9 p.m Speaker for Ladies and Girls no fee Great topic: Loving living in Israel and security issues and challenges in Shomron and Yehuda Speaker is the dynamic Natalie Sopinksy mother wife of five children life guard in Susya the regional pool for Yehuda region, lawyer and director in community matters for One Israel Fund – Listen to the details about families loving their excellent schools and loving Jewish neighbors learn about the terrorism and be a sympathetic Jew hearing about Jews all around Israel Be There! Where: Hakablan 41/18, Har Nof, Hostess: Chana Tova Sokol, call to say you can come so we can have enough refreshments. “Outrage” By Arlene Kushner, Outstanding Grocery list to help you buy produce, fresh, dried frozen in the United States – list of VEGAN BROCCOLI BURGERS Macrobiotic Recipes for the Sukkah Kenes for your delight

August 25, 2016, Thursday, 8 to 9 p.m.

Speaker for Ladies and Girls, no fee

Great topic: Loving living in Israel and security

issues and challenges in Shomron and Yehuda

Speaker is the dynamic Natalie Sopinksy, mother, wife of five children, life guard in Susya, the regional pool

for Yehuda region, lawyer and director in community matters for One Israel Fun Listen to the details about families loving their excellent schools and loving Jewish neighbors,

learn about the terrorism and be a sympathetic Jew hearing about Jews all around Israel

Be There! Where: Hakablan 41/18, Har Nof, Hostess: Chana Tova Sokol,  call to say you can come so we can have enough refreshments

Observant Jews are scrupulous about carrying out the mitzvot. Many of the laws relate to living in the “Land”. Looking over my shoulder, the theme of this blog post appears to be our connection to the laws, including but not limited to place and food.

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one  page for kashrut labels seen in Israel.

The second group are seen on products often imported to Israel. I have a photo of the group on my phone. When I come across an unfamiliar hechshir I look it up on my flicker account.

I appreciate  Rabbi Rasskamm of Denver Colorado for his list of All food items –  for people who still cook.

He arranged the foods in a convenient order.

Aside from family and friends and of-course all the infinite number of distractions of NYC, I miss the many Korean fruit stalls in Flushing with the five varieties of cabbage.

Last time that I visited Silver Spring Maryland, the Chinese  tofu and  pasta, had  reliable Hechshirim on the packaging, so I guess, now 4 years later the trend has taken off with more variety available. That being the case in any community with Orthodox Jews and Orientals will have lots of choices.

We are a nation governed by laws. Hebron is our place, the greatest symbol of that relationship to law was established by our father Abraham’s purchase of plain and the cave and the burial of Sarah, Abraham and Jacob there (Gen.23 and elsewhere). Needless to say Jewish presence in Hebron, no matter how small, has  been a thorn in the side of the Arabs.

“Outrage”

By Arlene Kushner

I’m talking about steam-coming-out-of-my-ears outrage.

The subject is the allegedly ancient Arab village of Susiya.  The issue is Israel’s rights as a sovereign state operating under rules of law.

The background, briefly:

In the Hebron Hills of Judea there are the remains of an ancient Jewish city known as Susiya, which flourished in the Talmudic era. It is estimated that about 3,000 people – all Jews, observing a religious life – lived there at its height.  Archeological remains, including a synagogue, that have been excavated can be visited today.

Credit: Susiya Tourist Center
Still retained within the synagogue is an ancient mosaic floor:

Credit: mfa

Not far from this archeological site, there is a modern Jewish town of Susiya.

But within the area of the archeological remains there is also an Arab squatters’ village. It consists today of some 60+ constructions of concrete, tin and canvas.  They call this village Susiya as well.  And those squatting on the land claim that their village has been there for a very long time.

The facts tell a very different story:

There is no evidence of an old Arab village there.  Aerial photos indicate that with the exception of four building constructed in the 90s, there was nothing on the site until after 2000.  In fact, when the surveys conducted by the British mandatory powers in 1945 – which mention all of the villages in the area – are examined, no mention of a village named Susiya is found.

The site had been used seasonally by Bedouin shepherds, who found shelter in the caves in the region.  But in 1986, 277 dunams (about 68 acres) of land in the area, including this location, were declared to be an archeological site, at which time the caves were no longer available to the Bedouin.

Most of the buildings went up between 2011 and 2013 in defiance of a court order forbidding the building.

Now here it gets really interesting:

When the population registry of the Civil Administration was examined, it was found that most of the people claiming to live in Susiya had homes in the nearby town of Yatta (which is in Area A under PA jurisdiction).

How about that!  They move between their real homes in Yatta and the hovels in Susiya as it serves their political purpose – they come out when an entourage of left wing activists or a cadre of journalists (also most likely left wing) is due to visit.  When I was there, on a Regavim tour, the place was empty.

What we are in fact seeing here is a land grab by the Palestinian ArabNawajah family of Yatta, which has built illegally and in blatant violation of Israeli court orders.

Two facts must be emphasized.  One is that this matter has been thoroughly adjudicated.  That is, the courts – with due process and over a period of time – fully and fairly considered the issues.  The courts determined that the claims of the squatters were without basis, that they had been operating in contempt of court, and that the buildings that had been erected must be demolished.  This was not a determination arrived at lightly: the buildings had to come down.

And then, even though these were squatters without legal rights to the land, an offer was made to them regarding an allocation of land, in area C beyond the archeological site, near Yatta, to which they might move. But they refused and applied for legalization of their current site – which was rejected by the Court.  Aside from everything else, a village was not about to be legalized in a designated archeological area, which requires protection.

Further details can be seen here: http://regavim.org/susiya_facts/After multiple delays, the time now draws near for the demolition of many of the structures in illegal Arab Susiya.  It was last month that the Court ruled on this yet again.

But nothing is ever simple here in Israel, where the Western world seems to think it has a right to a say about everything we do.  This is the outrage: that others think they can tell a sovereign state that operates according to the rule of law what to do.  The interference is breathtakingly offensive.  We are forced to wonder if they would imagine interfering in the internal affairs of any other state in this fashion.

The eminent demolition of buildings in Arab Susiya has become a cause célèbre in left wing circles.  “Susiya 4ever!” they say, as if this is some noble cause.

Even a Senator – Dianne Feinstein – imagined she had a right to say something about what Israel was doing. And several NGOs have been involved.

Rabbis for Human Rights:  were they to recommend that the demolition be shelved, the Court would likely accept this – there would be no reason not to.Word is that Lieberman will tell the Court we must go ahead.

With all of the hullabaloo, the worst that has happened in recent days is that the State Department has weighed in. On July 16th, State Department spokesman John Kirby let it be known that the US was “closely following developments.”

We need them to monitor what we are doing?  There is a warning implicit in this.

At a press briefing he said (emphasis added):

We strongly urge the Israeli authorities to refrain from carrying out any demolitions in the village. Demolition of this Palestinian village or of parts of it, and evictions of Palestinians from their homes, would be harmful and provocative…”

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/198267

Provocative?? 

Elsewhere it has been reported that the US is putting great pressure on Israel with regard to this matter, and has indicated that if the demolition proceeds “the US response would be extremely severe.”

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/216223

I hope and trust that steam is now coming out of your ears as well.

It is imperative that the Israeli government stand strong in the face of this.  Otherwise our legal system is degraded and our state is demeaned. If the US finds it can push us around here, what comes next?<>And so I ask each of you to voice support to our leaders.

Long emails are counter-productive.  Our leaders and their aides are extremely busy. They do not need lectures or history lessons or legal instruction.  They don’t need to see your credentials or learn of your experiences. When they see this it is a turn-off and they probably don’t even read the message through.  What counts here is that they see a large number of brief supportive messages. A maximum of four sentences.

Tell them that you are furious about the pressure being applied by the US government with regard to the demolition of illegal buildings in Arab Susiya.  Tell them you are with them. Urge them to stand strong no matter what.

The most important person to reach is Defense Minister Lieberman.  The way to do this is via his aide, who will carry your message, here:ozer_sar@mod.gov.il (underscore between ozer and sar)  In the subject line: “A message for Minister Lieberman” or something similar.  If you just write to him, it would be great.

But then, if you wish, write as well to Prime Minister Netanyahu, delivering the same message. Use all of these addresses, which are all to the prime minister’s office:

davidkeyes@pmo.gov.il

Memshala@pmo.gov.il

pm_eng2@it.pmo.gov.il (underscore after pm)

If you want to send email messages, it should be done today.

VEGAN BROCCOLI BURGERS

Author: Lindsay Rey

Recipe type: sandwich

Cuisine: American

Serves: 4

INGREDIENTS

  • 1½ cups cooked/steamed broccoli (thoroughly drained and lightly packed into measuring cup)

  • 1 cup walnuts

  • 1 cup cooked brown rice

  • ¼ cup vital wheat gluten

  • 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast flakes

  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce

  • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder

  • Salt to taste

  • 2-3 tablespoons water (only if needed)

  • 2-4 tablespoons oil of your choice (for pan-frying patties)

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Steam/cook broccoli (fresh or frozen) in a saucepan on medium heat until broccoli is fork-tender.

  2. In a blender of food processor, pulse walnut pieces until they resemble a course meal, but have not yet become walnut butter. Place walnut pieces in a large mixing bowl.

  3. In a blender or food processor, pulse cooked/drained broccoli until it is crumbled into very tiny pieces, but not yet a puree.

  4. Please broccoli and remaining ingredients in mixing bowl with walnuts and rice. If your mixture seems dry and crumbly, go ahead and add a tablespoon of water. This stuff can turn into soggy goop pretty quickly, so you’ll want to be very careful to add only a scant tablespoon og water at a time to your burger mixture.

  5. Stir burger mix well, then shape into 4 equal burgers.

  6. Pour a tablespoon or 2 of oil (just enough to coat the pan) in a skillet and place on medium to medium-high heat.

  7. Gently pan-fry your burgers, allowing a few minutes for cooking on each side.

  8. You’ll know they are done when the burger surface has a nice dark brown crispness.

  9. Serve burgers warm on vegan buns with veggies and condiments of your choice (I chose a mix of Just Mayo, pickle relish, and ketchup.)

The product list below is extremely lengthy. Orthodox Jewish families, and kosher institutions have migrated to middle America and elsewhere in the world. Kosher processed food has followed them.

I remember the first Kosher Food festival was held in the Javitt’s Center. The number of purveyors required a larger space.

I feel that this list would be helpful for the “wise” consumer. If one lives close to a “Kosher” supermarket, there is a trade-off. One will pay more for equivalent quality items than perhaps is available cheaper for a “Box” store or chain supermarket  label or with national brands. Hence this list is for one living or traveling outside of Israel and would like to save money: However, on the other hand, one may choose to pay more to support companies that have their own Hashgagah arrangements. Company’s pay to develop consumer confidence and that cost is inevitably passed on to the consumer. 

List with some of my changes and additions from Rabbi Ysrael Rosskamm

Vaad Ha Kashrut, Denver, Colorado follows:

Products not requiring a Kosher Hechshir:

DISPOSABLE UTENSILS & FOOD WRAPS
Aluminum Foil – Does not require certification.
Aluminum Foil Pans – Does not require certification.
Foam Containers & Plates – Does not require certification.
Freezer Paper – Does not require certification.
Paper Plates – Does not require certification.
Parchment Paper – Quilon treated, requires reliable certification; silicon treated, does not require certification.
Plastic Flatware & Plates – Does not require certification.
Plastic Wrap & Bags – Does not require certification.
Waxed Paper – Does not require certification.

EGGS
Eggbeaters – Require reliable certification.
Eggs, non-processed – does not require certification. They should be checked to ensure that they do not contain blood spots.

Fresh Fish – Whole fish and fish steaks should, preferably, be purchased from a store which has reliable rabbinical supervision. This is because non-kosher stores in America that sell fish commonly use one knife to cut different species, kosher and non-kosher alike. Therefore, residue from the slicing of non-kosher fish may remain on the blade of the knife and, subsequently, be rubbed onto the cutting site of the kosher fish.
However, one may buy whole fish or fish steaks, even if it is gutted, from any store, provided the following conditions are met:
1. One did not actually see the kosher fish soaking amidst non-kosher fish.
2. Some scales are still on the fish.
3. Prior to cooking the fish, one should take a straight edged knife and, using only minimal pressure, scrape off the area where the store knife would have cut. This would wipe off any residue from the blade that cut the non-kosher fish. After this, thoroughly wash the fish.
Gefilte Fish – Requires reliable certification.
Ground Fish – Requires reliable certification.
Imitation Crabmeat – Requires reliable certification.
Lox – Requires reliable certification.
Smoked Fish – Requires reliable certification.
The following is a partial list of kosher and non-kosher species of fish: Note: In order to verify that a fish is kosher, one MUST see that it has removable scales, you can not rely on the fact its name is listed on the kosher list.
Kosher Fish
Albacore
Bass
Buffalo Fish
Carp
Char Cod
Flounder
Goldfish
Grouper
Haddock
Halibut
Herring
Mackerel
Mahi Mahi
Blue Marlin
Orange
Roughee
Perch
Pike
Pollock
Salmon
Sardines
Snapper
Sole
Suckers
Trout
Tuna
Walleye
Whitefish
Whiting
Non Kosher Fish
CATFISH
EELS
GRAYFISH
SHARK
SNAKE MACKERELS
PUFFER
STURGEONS
SWORDFISH

FRUIT: Applies outside of Israel. Any fruit vegetable and grain grown in Israel, dried fresh or canned requires proper Israeli Hechshir.
Canned or plastic cups (non aseptic)

Canned fruits not from China and Israel do not require kosher certification if they only contain one or more of the following ingredients: Ascorbic acid, citric acid, corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup, salt, sugar, water. Note: Other ingredients may require kosher certification.
Applesauce, pure – Without questionable ingredients.
Berries – Raspberries and blackberries are not recommended; other varieties, without questionable ingredients.
Cherries – Pitted or sweet, without questionable ingredients; maraschino cherries, require reliable certification.
Figs – Without questionable ingredients.
Fruit Cocktail – Without questionable ingredients, provided that you remove the cherries.
Guava – Does not require certification.
Mandarin Oranges (not from China) – Without questionable ingredients.
Mango – Does not require certification.
Peaches – Without questionable ingredients.
Pears – Without questionable ingredients.
Pineapples – Without questionable ingredients.
Plums – Without questionable ingredients.
Dried Fruit
Dried fruit, except for dried bananas, does not require certification. Freeze-dried, requires reliable certification.
Dried bananas – Require reliable certification.
Dried prunes – Do not require certification.

Fresh Only grown outside of Israel. Methods of checking are the same.
Fresh fruits do not require certification. Again All fresh fruits in Israel require certification. However, some varieties require a thorough inspection prior to cooking and eating to ensure that they are free of insects. All varieties should be inspected to ensure that they do not have a worm hole, which may indicate the presence of a worm inside. A guide for preparing fruits and vegetables is available at http://scrollk.org/PrepFrtVeg.html.
Berries – Blackberries and red raspberries are not recommended, due to infestation, unless they are pureed; blueberries may be used after being soaked in soapy water for a few minutes and rinsed; strawberries may be used after cutting the top off, soak the strawberries in soapy water for 5 minutes and agitate the strawberries in the soapy water before rinsing THOROUGHLY under running water.
Nuts – Oil roasted, require reliable certification; raw and dry roasted do not require certification.
Raisins – Domestic without oil, does not require certification.
Frozen
Frozen insect-free varieties, without additives, are acceptable without certification.

HEALTH FOODS-List pertains to outside of Israel-checking methods required in all cases described. In Israel ALL below require Certification. If processed in America certification by a reputable Kashrut Authority required with the exception of Agar Agar and others on the list.

I’ve only seen Agar Agar with a circke K symbol on it in Israel.

Every form of loose health food item grown in Israel must have certification in Israel. Don’t be confused as the list is for American consumers.

Continue reading Post 343: August 25,2016 Thursday,8 to 9 p.m Speaker for Ladies and Girls no fee Great topic: Loving living in Israel and security issues and challenges in Shomron and Yehuda Speaker is the dynamic Natalie Sopinksy mother wife of five children life guard in Susya the regional pool for Yehuda region, lawyer and director in community matters for One Israel Fund – Listen to the details about families loving their excellent schools and loving Jewish neighbors learn about the terrorism and be a sympathetic Jew hearing about Jews all around Israel Be There! Where: Hakablan 41/18, Har Nof, Hostess: Chana Tova Sokol, call to say you can come so we can have enough refreshments. “Outrage” By Arlene Kushner, Outstanding Grocery list to help you buy produce, fresh, dried frozen in the United States – list of VEGAN BROCCOLI BURGERS Macrobiotic Recipes for the Sukkah Kenes for your delight

Post 321; 13th Annual English – Women’s Speakers Getaway 2016! Macrobiotic bulgher salad with recipe for almond cheese

Tue Jun 14, 2016 12:46 am (PDT) . Posted by:

“B. Weiss”

BS’D

*Join Bassya and Adina on the 13th Annual English-Speaking
Women’s Getaway!!!*

Tuesday June 28, 2016 – Thursday June 30, 2016
22-24 Sivan 5776

*Kinar Hotel, Galil*
2 nights full board (Eidah Chareidis, Shmitah l’Chumra) in a luxury hotel
(pool with female lifeguard), women’s beach open all day long in walking
distance, live entertainment, inspiring guest speakers, fun workshops,
unbeatable price. I joined this group for thir first escapade. Lot’s of fun.

*Book your place NOW!! Rooms are going fast! *
For details call Bassya 02 585 2297 or email Adina at
englishgetaway@gmail.com

Pereg, the famous spice seller in the shuk has a very interesting site for recipes in English, https://www.pereg-spices.com.

I tried to access the Hebrew one, and next time that I am at the shuk I’ll ask for help in the store. The salad recipe below is inspired by the English site.

https://www.pereg-spices.com/Blogs/Post/Greek-Couscous-Salad/15/

Modifications: Since I try not use salty cheese you are encouraged to soak and use natural almonds as indicated in an earlier post and repeated here.

Greek Couscous/bulgher Salad

Greek Couscous/bulgher  Salad

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Serves: 8, 1/2-cup servings

 

Ingredients:

·      1 ½ cups water

·      1 cup  Couscous or bulgher 

·      1/2 teaspoon salt plus 1/8 teaspoon, divided or omit

·      3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil plus 1 teaspoon, divided

·      1 cup cherry tomatoes, quartered cubed

·      1 cup cucumber (1 small), deseeded and small diced

·      ½ cup halved pitted kalamata olives, minced or omit- use Israel salt substitute

·      ¼ cup red onions, diced or red onions

·      2 tablespoons lemon juice

·      Crushed black pepper

·      Toasted pine nuts

·      1 tablespoon fresh mint, minced

·      2 tablespoons crumbled feta cheese, or almond cheese substitute.

·      1 tablespoon toasted pine nuts (optional)

Directions:

1.     In a large saucepan, bring water to a boil, add 1/8 teaspoon salt and 1 teaspoon extra olive oil. Then add couscous and stir. Cover with a lid and remove from heat. Let couscous steam for five minutes.

2.     Fluff with a fork and let cool.

3.     In large bowl, combine tomatoes, cucumber, olives/ or omit, red onions and then stir in couscous.

4.     In small bowl, whisk together lemon juice, remaining oil and salt, black pepper until well blended. Toss with couscous mixture and chill in the refrigerator until ready to serve. I generally stir in the lemon with the boiling water. I like the grain very dry. Garnish with fresh mint, feta and pine nuts right before serving. I also hold the oil until the end and adjust the quantity.

Almond Cheese: Most recipes for homemade almond cheese call for soaking the blanched almonds in cold water for 24 hours before making the cheese. I have made this cheese with almonds that I soaked and with almonds that were un-soaked and noticed very little difference in the final product. The cheese made with soaked almonds was perhaps slightly creamier. And the almonds start to sprout rendering them larger. So why bother soaking the almonds?

It is thought that soaking almonds ( and soaking other nuts and seeds) makes them easier to digest and makes it easier to absorb their nutrients. If you choose to soak the almonds before making this recipe, begin the night before. Place the almonds in a glass bowl or jar and cover completely with water. Cover the bowl or jar and refrigerate for 24 hours. Drain and rinse the almonds well.

Making the Lactose Free Almond Cheese

Put the almonds in a food processor or high-powered blender with the lemon juice, olive oil, salt and water. Blend until very smooth. This will take awhile, about 5 minutes.

Scrape the mixture into double-layered cheesecloth lining a colander. Gather the cheesecloth tightly around the almond mixture and secure into a bundle by using a rubber band or string to tie the top. Give the bundle a few gentle squeezes to remove liquid.

Leave the bundle in the colander and place in the refrigerator overnight over a bowl or rimmed plate to catch any liquid that might drain. You can also use a french white heart shaped porcelain bain-marie, by Apilco. This use allows you to soak, drain and pat dry. img_20160615_145151.jpg

Refrigerate for at least 12 hours. This helps the texture of the cheese become firmer. The holes in the bottom permit you to keep adding fresh water to cover . The the bath in another glass baking dish.

Discard any liquid that drains out. Carefully peel the cheesecloth off of the almond “cheese”. The “cheese” will have a consistency similar to cookie dough.

At this point, the almond cheese can be eaten as a spread or it can be gently shaped into a round about 3/4-inch thick and baked at 300 F for 30-40 minutes. After baking, the top will be dry and slightly firm. The inside will still be creamy.

Flavoring the Cheese

The cheese can be flavored by adding seasonings such as fresh garlic, fresh herbs and spices. Some recipes flavor the cheese with nutritional yeast. You can add these ingredients at the beginning when you are blending ingredients. Now the block is prepared for your bulgher salad

 

Post 302:Observations from my window, walkways in my neighborhood, simple band exercises, delicious pink dip

IMG_20160412_074521
Looking down from my window. A moment before,an Arab Istraeli street sanitation worker used the shomer’s  (the guard’s hut to change from street clothes to his uniform. Now that’s co-existence

 

IMG_20160413_122815
The Fifth floor pussy cat is taking in some sun-shine and watching the street action.

The pussy cat is in my line of sight below as I exercise (do hitamlut) on the wood platform of a restaurant called ha MaAlot. Of-course I perform these moves wearing a skirt!

The Routine for using stretch bands:

Move 1: Lunge With Biceps Curl

Move 2: Hug-the-World Plié

Move 3: Squat With Overhead Press

Move 4: Crunch With Lat Pull-Down

Move 5: Side Lunge With Side Raise

http://www.realsimple.com/health/fitness-exercise/workouts/resistance-band-exercises/view-all

Recipe Pretty Pink Dip

1 cooked, peeled beetroot (roughly chopped)
1 can all natural chickpeas (drained and rinsed)
1/4 cup organic tahini 
juice of one lemon 
2 tsp crushed garlic (2 cloves)
salt and pepper 

*gluten-free
*dairy-free
*egg-free
*vegan

Post 281: Useful numbers in Israel spaghetti squash and anything soup-recipes that will help you empty your pantry of chometz before Purim and Pesach.

 

These numbers might be helpful; (when you have guests or need to contact Embassies.

Useful numbers in Israel

[ Emergency Services | Hospitals | Pharmacies | Ambulances | Embassies & Consulates ][ Municipalities | 24-hour Help Lines | Public Information | Travel | Tourist Information ][ Foreign Currency Exchange | Airlines | Taxis | Internet Cafes | Car Rentals ]
Emergency Services

Police: 100;

Magen David Adom (First Aid): 101;

Fire: 102
Hospitals

Jerusalem

Sha’arei Zedek: (02) 655-5111;

Hadassah Ein Kerem: (02) 677-7111;

Hadassah Mt. Scopus: (02) 584-4111;

Bikur Holim: (02) 646-4111;

Misgav Ladach: (02) 563-7684
Tel Aviv

Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center (Ichilov) (except pediatrics): (03) 697-4444;

Dana Pediatrics Hospital: (03) 697-4504; Assuta, Jabotinsky 62: (03) 520-1515
Haifa

Rambam: (04) 854-3111; Bnei Tzion (Rothschild) Medical Center: (04) 835-9359
Ashkelon

Barzilai Medical Center: (08) 674-5555

Be’er Sheva

Soroka Hospital: (08) 640-0111
Eilat

Yoseph Tal: (08) 635-8011
Herzliya

Herzliya Medical Center: (09) 959-2555

Kfar Sava

Meir Hospital (Sapir Medical Center): (09) 747-2555
Netanya

Laniado, Tel: (09) 860-4666; Medic Media Corp: (09) 860-5151

Petah Tikva

Rabin Medical Center (Beilinson): (03) 937-7377;

Schneider Pediatrics Hospital: (03) 925-3666
Ramat Gan Tel Hashomer: (03) 530-3030

Ramle/LodAssaf

Harofeh: (08) 977-9999

Rehovot

Kaplan Medical Center: (08) 944-1211
Pharmacies

Tel Aviv

Superpharm Dizengoff Center, 50 Dizengoff: (03) 620-0975 Superpharm Gimmel, 1 Ahimeir, Ramat Aviv Gimmel: (03) 641-7171Superpharm London Ministore, 4 Shaul Hamelech: (03) 696-0106 Superpharm, 40 Einstein: (03) 641-3730 Superpharm, 72 Pinkhas Rosen: (03) 644-0114 Briut, 28 King George: (03) 528-3731 Clal Pharm Gan Ha’ir, 71 Ibn Gvirol: (03) 527-9317
Jerusalem Superpharm, 3 Hahistadrut: (02) 624-6244 Superpharm, Malkha Shopping Mall: (02) 679-3260Superpharm, 5 Burla, Nayot: (02) 646-7555Superpharm Gilo, Gilo Commercial Center: (02) 676-1873 Center Pharm, 18 Yad Kharutsim: (02) 673-1475 Center Pharm, Har Hahotzvim, 1 Hamarpeh: (02) 586-9744
Haifa Superpharm, 15 Horev: (04) 824-6167 Superpharm, 2 Khouri: 051-582-021 Superpharm, 53 Hahistadrut: 051-582-021 Superpharm, Migdal Hanevi’im: 051-582-021 Superpharm, 54 Trumpeldor: (04) 823-2569 Superpharm, 6 Ha’aroshet: (04) 842-0540 Hanassi, 33 Hanassi: (04) 833-3312 Newpharm, 40 Hanita: 052-331-013
Ashkelon Superpharm, Giron Mall: (07) 671-1431 Rom, 97 Hanassi: (07) 673-5542
Bat Yam Ganei Bat Yam, 3 Hanevi’im: (03) 551-5671 Mazor, 20 Haviva Reich: (03) 658-3360 Mor, 9 Balfour: (03) 658-3042 Vita, 62 Ha’atzmaot St: (03) 506-2919
Be’er ShevaSuperpharm, 70 Hameshachrerim: (07) 642-4313 Superpharm, Hanegev Mall: (07) 628-1371 Hanegev, 94 KKL: (07) 627-7016 Kupat Holim Clalit, Szold: (07) 623-7712
Eilat Superpharm, Beit Hadekel, Canyon Shar Ha’ir: (07) 637-6870
HerzliyaSuperpharm, 25 Sokolov: (09) 950-0011
Hod HasharonSuperpharm, Margalit Mall: (09) 740-8681 Magdiel, 54 Magdiel: (09) 741-5567 Margalit Shopping Mall, 3 Jabotinsky: (09) 740-8681
HolonSuperpharm, Holon Shopping Mall, 7 Golda Meir: (03) 505-6720 Aharon, 52 Hofein: (03) 651-9153
Kfar SavaSuperpharm, 3 Ostshinksi: (09) 765-8889 Narkiss, 8 Hativat Golani: (09) 761-8248 Avner Gilad, 34 Weizmann: (09) 762-6826
NetanyaCenter Pharm, 1 David Hamelech: (09) 884-1531 Hasharon Shopping Mall, 36 Herzl: (09) 882-3639 Hadarim Shopping Mall, 2 Hakadar, Industrial Zone: (09) 862-8436 Newpharm, 60 Binyamin: (09) 883-8091
Petah TikvaSuperhparm “Heychal,” 26 Hahistadrut: (03) 904-6730 Superpharm, 43 Shapira: (03) 930-9030 Superhparm, 13 Hovevei Zion: (03) 930-3191 HyperPharm, Basel: (03) 921-1106 Assuta, 23 Baron Hirsch: (03) 931-1710
Ra’ananaSuperpharm, 277 Ahuza: (09) 774-1616 Golan Center, 198 Ahuza: (09) 744-9702 Hyper-Pharm, 8 Haroshet, Industrial Zone: (09) 748-3537
Ramat GanSuperpharm, 10 Bialik: (03) 670-1235 Superpharm, 7 Tirza: (03) 574-9770 Aliya, 2 Krinitsky: (03) 672-2840 Maccabi, 71 Jabotinsky: (03) 751-6272 Pharma Plus D-Mall, 1A Jabotinsky: (03) 575-9891
Ramat HasharonSuperpharm, Rav Mecher Tzomet Glilot: (03) 699-4313 S.R.M., 5 Ussishkin: (03) 540-2454
Rishon LetzionSuperpharm, 21 Sacharov David: (03) 961-6156 Ramat Eliyahu, 10 Zeitlin: (03) 961-0495

Ambulances

Tel Aviv Magen David Adom: (03) 546-0111 Natali: (03) 653-5511 Zvika: (03) 561-7879 E.E.S.: (03) 687-1842 Zuri Ambulance: (03) 537-6277
Jerusalem A.A.A. Abit Private Ambulance, Yaacov Levi: (02) 622-2111 Ambulance Habira: (02) 535-7336 Ben Yishai David: (02) 678-2398
Haifa A.A. Ehud Ambulance founded by Blue Magen David: (04) 866-3366 Ambulance Hatzafon: (04) 877-3377 “Ambulente” Ambulance Services: (04) 851-5888
Ashkelon Hadarom Ambulance: (07) 672-2627 Ner David Avi Association: (07) 672-3216
Eilat

Eilat Ambulance: 050-553-100
Be’er Sheva Gaz Ambulance: (07) 649-7955 Levi Yishai Ambulance: (07) 643-5021 Ivgy Yoram: (07) 658-5317
Herzliya Yizhar Ambulances: (09) 956-7088
Holon

Egged Ambulance: (03) 550-9156
Kfar SavaRon Ambulance: (09) 767-0838
Netanya Derech Hachaim: (09) 833-7031 Tal Raz: (09) 861-4417
Petah Tikva Ambulance Sami and Jacob: (03) 535-1129 Tal Ambulance: (03) 930-1924
Ra’ananaShahal Medical Services: (09) 760-4455
Ramat Gan Ambulance A.B.: (03) 676-5717 Ambulance Noam: (03) 574-3339 Magen David Adom: (03) 579-3589
Rehovot Ambulance Dor-2000: 935-4177 Shlomo Ambulance: (08) 941-8004
Rishon Letzion Shahal: (03) 831-4333 E.R.N. Ambulance: (03) 945-1828

Embassies & Consulates(In Tel Aviv, unless otherwise noted) The Consulate of Armenia, 5 Sheikh Jarrah, Jerusalem: (02) 581-7162
The Embassy of Argentina, 3 Jabotinsky, Ramat Gan: (03) 575-9173
The Embassy of Australian, 37 Shaul Hamelech, Europe House: (03) 693-5000
The Embassy of Austria, 12 Hahilazon, Ramat Gan: (03) 612-0924
The Embassy of Belarus, 2 Koifman: (03) 510-2236
The Embassy of Belgium, 12 Hahilazon, Ramat Gan: (03) 6138130
The Consulate of Britain, 1 Ben Yehuda: (03) 510-0166
The Embassy of Britain, 192 Hayarkon: (03) 725-1222
The Embassy of Bulgaria, 124 Ibn Gvirol: (03) 524-1751
The Embassy of Cameroon, 10 Koifman: (03) 519-0011
The Embassy of Canada, 3 Nirim Beit Hasapanut: (03) 636-3300
The Embassy of Chile, 7 Havakuk: (03) 602-0130
The Embassy of China, 222 Ben Yehuda: (03) 546-7277
The Embassy of Colombia, 52 Pinkas: (03) 546-1717
The Embassy of the Republic of Congo, 1 Rachel: (03) 524-8306
The Embassy of Costa Rica, 13 Diskin, Jerusalem: (02) 566-6197
The Embassy of Croatia, Canyon Ramat Aviv: (03) 643-8654
The Embassy of Cyprus, 50 Dizengoff: (03) 525-0212
The Embassy of the Czech Republic, 23 Zeitlin: (03) 691-8282
The Embassy of Denmark, 23 Bnei Moshe: (03) 544-2144
The Consulate General of the Dominican Republic, 13 Yona Hanavi: (03) 516-2020
The Embassy of the Dominican Republic, 19 Soutine: (03) 527-7073
The Embassy of Ecuador, Asia House, 4 Weizmann: (03) 695-8764
The Consulate of Ecuador, 12 Harav Friedman: (03) 604-6856
The Embassy of Egypt, 54 Basel: (03) 546-4151
The Embassy of El Salvador, 4 Avigayil, Jerusalem: (02) 672-8411
The Embassy of Ethiopia, 48 Petah Tikva: (03) 639-7831
The Embassy of Finland, 40 Einstein: (03) 744-0303
The Consulate of France, 1 Ben Yehuda: (03) 510-1415
The Embassy of France, 112 Herbert Samuel: (03) 524-5371
The Embassy of Germany, 3 Daniel Frisch: (03) 693-1313
The Embassy of Ghana, 15 Abba Hillel: (03) 752-0834
The Embassy of Greece Embassy, 47 Bodenheimer: (03) 603-3461
The Embassy of Guatemala, Beit Ackerstein, Herzliya Pituah: (09) 956-8707
The Embassy of Hungary, 18 Pinkas: (03) 546-6991
The Consulate General of Iceland, 5 Tuval: (03) 623-5013
The Embassy of India, 4 Kaufman: (03) 510-1431
The Embassy of Ireland, 3 Daniel Frisch: (03) 696-4166
The Embassy of Italy, 25 Hamered: (03) 510-4004
The Embassy of the Ivory Coast, 25 Bezalel, South Africa Building: (03) 612-6677
The Embassy of Japan, Asia House, 4 Weizmann: (03) 695-7292
The Embassy of Jordan, 14 Abba Hillel, Ramat Gan: (03) 751-7722
The Embassy of Kenya, 15 Abba Hillel, Ramat Gan: (03) 575-4633
The Embassy of Korea, 38 Chen: (03) 696-3244
The Embassy of Latvia, 2 Weizman: (03) 03-727-5800
The Embassy of Liberia, 74 Menachem Begin: (03) 561-1068
The Embassy of Lithuania, 8 Shaul Hamelech: (03) 695-8685
The Embassy of Mexico, 25 Hamered: (03) 516-3938
The Embassy of Moldova, 7 Havakuk: (03) 604-0014
The Consulate General of Monaco, 51 Hamelech David: (03) 522-3053
The Embassy of the Netherlands, 14 Abba Hillel, Ramat Gan: (03) 752-3150
The Embassy of Nigeria, 34 Gordon: (03) 522-2144
The Embassy of Norway, 40 Einstein: (03) 744-1490
The Representative of Oman, 79 Yehuda Hamaccabi: (03) 546-7860
The Consulate General of Paraguay, 1/4 Rehov Carmel, Mevasseret Zion: (03) 561-5268
The Embassy of Panamana, 10 Hei Be’lyar: (03) 695-6711
The Consulate of Papua New Guinea, P.O. Box 31081, Jerusalem: (02) 534-1721
The Embassy of Paraguay, 1 Carmel St., Mevasseret Zion: (02) 533-4830
The Embassy of Peru, 60 Medinat Hayelmedim, Herzliya Petuach: (03) 957-8835
The Embassy of the Phillipines, 2 Koifman: (03) 517-0653
The Embassy of Poland, 16 Soutine Street: (03) 524-0186
The Embassy of Portugal, 3 Daniel Frisch: (03) 695-6373
The Embassy of Romania, 24 Adam Hacohen: (03) 524-2482
The Consulate of Russia, 1 Ben Yehuda: (03) 510-1020
The Embassy of Russia, 120 Hayarkon: (03) 522-6736
The Embassy of Rwanda, 30 Hei Be’lyar: (03) 691-2319
The Embassy of Slovakia, 37 Jabotinsky: (03) 544-9119
The Embassy of Slovenia, 50 Dizengoff: (03) 524-2482
The Embassy of South Africa, 50 Dizengoff: (03) 525-2566
The Embassy of Sweden, Asia House, 4 Weizmann: (03) 695-8111
The Embassy of Switzerland, 228 Hayarkon: (03) 546-4455
The Embassy of Spain, 3 Daniel Frisch: (03) 696-5218
The Economic and Cultural Office Taipei, Azrieli Center: (03) 695-4688
The Embassy of Thailand, 21 Shaul Hamelech: (03) 695-8980
The Commercial Section of Thailand, 57 Pinsker: (03) 528-0870
The Embassy of Turkey, 202 Hayarkon: (03) 524-1101
The Consulate of Uganda, 21 Yunitzman: (03) 690-2743
The Embassy of the Ukraine, 12 Stricker: (03) 604-0242
The Consulate of the Ukraine, 1 Ben Yehuda: (03) 517-8784
The Embassy of the United States, 71 Hayarkon: (03) 519-7575
The Embassy of Uruguay, 73 Nordau, Herzliya: (09) 956-9612
The Consulate of Uzbekistan, 4 Mateh Aharon, Ramat Gan: (03) 579-6026
The Embassy of the Vatican, 1 Netiv Hamazalot, Old Jaffa: (03) 683-5658
The Embassy of Venezuela, 2 Koifman: (03) 517-6287
The Embassy of Yugoslavia, 10 Bodenheimer: (03) 604-5535
The Embassy of Zaire, 1/2 Rachel: (03) 524-8306

Municipalities

Tel Aviv-Jaffa: (03) 521-8438
Jerusalem: (02) 629-7777
Haifa: (04) 835-6356
Ashkelon: (07) 677-0111
Bat Yam: (03) 555-8555
Be’er Sheva: (07) 646-3666
Herzliya: (09) 959-1515
Hod Hasharon: (09) 742-4121
Holon: (03) 502-7222
Kfar Sava: (09) 764-9111
Netanya: (09) 860-3131
Petah Tikva: (03) 905-2222
Ra’anana: (09) 761-0610
Ramat Gan: (03) 675-3555
Rehovot: (08) 939-2222
Rishon Letzion: (03) 968-5666
Tiberias: (04) 673-9555

24-hour Help Lines

Eran Emotional First Aid: 1201
Dental Clinic 18 Reines St., Tel Aviv: (03) 523-9241; 2 Moriah Street, Jerusalem: (02) 537-3691
WIZO Hot line for battered women: (03) 546-1133, (08) 855-0506, (02) 651-4111
Rape Crisis Center Tel: 1202 or Tel Aviv: (03) 517-6176, Jerusalem: (02) 625-5558, Haifa: (04) 853-0533, southern Israel: (07) 633-1977
National Poison Control Center: (04) 852-9205
Child Abuse Hotline: (04) 855-6611
Crisis Counseling Hotline in English: 1-800-654-1111 or (02) 654-1111
Teletmicha Israel Cancer Association hotline for patients and their families: (02) 624-7676
Yad Sarah Medical (rehab equipment, oxygen supplies): (02) 644-4444
Public Information Telephone Repair and Maintenance: 166
Electric Corporation: 103
Information (Bezeq): 144
TravelFlight Information: (03) 972-3333 (Hebrew), (03) 972-3344 (English)
Bus Schedules: (03) 694-8888
Train Schedules: (03) 693-7515
Airport Bus: (Tel Aviv – Ben Gurion): (03) 607-0000
Tourist Information OfficesAcre: (04) 991-1764
Arad: (07) 995-4409
Ben Gurion Airport: (03) 971-1485
Eilat: (07) 637-2111
Haifa: (04) 853-5606
Jerusalem (Safra Sq.): (02) 625-8844
Jerusalem (Jaffa Gate): (02) 628-0382
Nazareth: (06) 657-0555
Netanya: (09) 882-7286
Safed: (06) 692-7485
Tel Aviv (Central Bus Station): (03) 639-5660
Tel Aviv (City Hall): (03) 521-8500
Tiberias: (06) 672-5666
Foreign Currency Exchange OfficesTel Aviv Area:Change Spot, 140 Dizengoff, Tel Aviv: (03) 524-3393
Quick Change, 22 Ben Yehuda, Tel Aviv: (03) 629-9299
Quick Change Phone-Li, Azrieli Center, Tel Aviv: (03) 609-5020
Change, 2 Nehemia, Bnei Brak: (03) 578-8419
Change Bar, 94 Hayarkon, Tel Aviv: (03) 527-9050
Change Spot, 1 Ben Yehuda, Tel Aviv: (03) 510-3301
Change Spot, Opera Tower, Tel Aviv: (03) 510-6035
Change Spot, 35 Sokolow, Holon: (03) 503-8079
Jerusalem: Calothy Jaleb, 4 Salah A-Din: (02) 628-2915
Change Point, 2 Ben Yehuda: (02) 624-0011
Change Spot, Malka Kanyon: (02) 679-5401
Levi Yithak, Talpiot Kanyon: (02) 672-2070
Moneynet Ltd., 8 Ben Hillel: (02) 622-2318
Haifa: Change Spot, 5 Nordau, Haifa, (04) 864-4111
Eilat: Change Express, 137 Shalom Center: (07) 632-6842
Interchange, Mall Hayam: (07) 634-0049
Moneynet Ltd., North Beach: (07) 632-6696
Sinai Change, King Solomon Promenade: (07) 631-8450
NazarethChange Spot, Jumbo Center, 1st Floor: (06) 657-7288
NetanyaChange Spot, 5 Herzl: (09) 832-2112
Tiberias Maninet Ltd., 3 Habanim Midrehov 2nd Floor: (04) 672-4048
Airlines:Aero Mexico, 23 Ben Yehuda, Tel Aviv: (03) 795-1333
Air Canada, 1 Ben Yehuda, Tel Aviv: (03) 511-8686
Air France, 1 Ben Yehuda, Tel Aviv: (03) 511-0000
Alitalia, Ben Gurion Airport: (03) 971-1047
American Airlines, 29 Ben Yehuda, Tel Aviv: (03) 795-2122
Arkia International Ltd., 11 Frishman, Tel Aviv: (03) 523-3285
Austrian Airlines, 1 Ben Yehuda, Tel Aviv: (03) 511-5110
British Airways, Azrieli Center, 20th Floor, Round Building, Tel Aviv: (03) 608-1800
Continental Airlines, 25 Hamered, Tel Aviv: (03) 511-6700
Delta Airlines, 29 Allenby, Tel Aviv: (03) 620-1101
El Al Israel Airlines, 32 Ben Yehuda, Tel Aviv: (03) 526-1222
Japan Airlines, 23 Ben Yehuda, Tel Aviv: (03) 795-1333
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, Ben Gurion Airport: (03) 971-1138
Lufthansa German Airlines, 1 Ben Yehuda, Tel Aviv: (03) 514-2350
S.A.S. Scandinavian Airlines, 1 Ben Yehuda, Tel Aviv: (03) 510-1177
Sabena Belgian World Airlines, 1 Ben Yehuda, Tel Aviv: (03) 511-6610
South African Airways Israel Building, 5 Shalom Aleichem, Tel Aviv: (03) 795-1344
Swissair Swiss Airlines, 1 Ben Yehuda, Tel Aviv: (03) 511-6666
Turkish Airlines, 78 Hayarkon, Tel Aviv: (03) 517-2333
T.W.A. Trans World Airlines Inc., 76 Hayarkon, Tel Aviv: (03) 795-5355
Taxis:Tel Aviv:Hashekem: (03) 527-0404
Kastel: (03) 699-3322
New York: (03) 523-7722
Nordau: (03) 546-6222
JerusalemGilo: (02) 676-5888
Hapalmach: (02) 679-3333
King David: (02) 625-2510
HaifaBalfour: (04) 866-8383
Carmel: (04) 838-2626
EilatHamelech Shlomo: (07) 633-3338
Taba: (07) 633-3339

Internet Cafes
Tel AvivBambili, 22 Peretz: (03) 688-8031
Private Link, 78 Ben Yehuda: (03) 529-9889
Webstop, 28 Bograshov: (03) 620-2682
JerusalemAlami Net i.Cafe, 2 Mount of Olives: (02) 627-7891
The Netcafe, 9 Heleni Hamalka: (02) 624-6327
The Site, 12 Rivlin: (02) 625-9888

Strudel Internet Cafe and Wine Bar, 11 Monbaz Street: (02) 623-2101
HaifaNorEm Internet Cafe, 29 Nordau: (04) 866-5656
EilatBJ’s Books, New Tourist Center: (07) 634-0905
Private Link, Central Bus Station: (07) 634-4331
Car RentalsTel AvivAvis, 113 Hayarkon: (03) 527-1752 Eldan, 20 Hahaskala Boulevard: (03) 565-4545
Jerusalem Avis, 22 King David: (02) 624-9001 Eldan, 24 King David: (02) 625-2151/9
Haifa Avis, 7 Ben Gurion Boulevard: (04) 851-3050
EilatAvis, Tourist Info Center: (07) 637-3164 Eldan, 143 Merkaz Shalom: (07) 637-4027
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read more: http://www.haaretz.com/news/useful-numbers-in-israel-1.63269

Sloopy Soup-use what you have before Purim and Pesach

Why did we call it Sloopy Soup? Well, we can’t quite remember, to tell you the truth! But it’s been hanging around as a favorite in our home for years. Because it turns out different every single time we make it. Every single time! In other words, you’ll never get bored with Sloopy Soup. And If you begin now you can empty out those grains and legumes!

I thought you might enjoy learning how to make it too.

This isn’t an exact recipe, because I don’t use a recipe when I make it. But you’ll get the gist.

The main point of the soup is to stuff it with whole foods. You can use any combination of beans/legumes/lentils, vegetables, and whole grains. These whole foods form the base of the vegan diet and their slow-burning carbs will keep you filled up for hours.

Sloopy Soup!

Start with about 2 cups of any combination of uncooked dried beans, lentils, split peas, or other legume. I recommend pre-soaking them in triple the fresh water for at least 8 hours, although 24 hours is best.

You’ll also need about 1 cup of your favorite grain, uncooked. Again, pre-soaking your grain is best.

Next, chop any vegetables you’d like such as broccoli, carrots, celery, cabbage, beets, organic corn, potatoes, etc. You’ll want to end up with about 6 cups’ worth of chopped veggies.

Finally, chop up any dark leafy green such as kale or collards or Swiss chard, etc. When you’re done coarsely chopping them they should measure about 4 cups’ worth of dark greens.

Now, let’s put your soup together.

Boil about 8 cups of water (more or less, depending on how thin/thick you like your soup) in a large pot that has a lid—you can also use unsalted vegetable broth. Add your (drained) pre-soaked beans/legumes, your (drained) pre-soaked grains, and all of the vegetables—don’t forget the greens, even lettuce!

At this point you can also add 1/2 cup nuts (any kind will do) and even 1/2 cup of raisins which add a fun “pop” to a mouthful of soup because they plump up as the soup cooks.

Bring your soup to a boil, then lower the heat to the lowest flame and simmer for 45 minutes to 1 1/2 hours or until the beans/legumes can be smushed between the roof of your mouth and your tongue and the grains are tender.

During the last 10 minutes of cooking, if you used plain water earlier go ahead and add 4 vegetable bouillon cubes now. (We add these last if they’re the salted variety so the salt doesn’t interfere with the cooking of the beans.) At this time you’ll also add any combination of herbs and spices you like such as basil, oregano, marjoram, celery seeds, salt, pepper, red chili pepper flakes, etc.

Turn off the heat and let your soup sit for 10 minutes. Stir. Serve.

This “recipe” serves about 8 but it can be halved if you’d like. Leftovers store beautifully in the fridge and even in a tightly-sealed container in the freezer.

Sloopy Soup…

…is a meal everyone in your family will love, especially because you can tailor it to your favorite whole food ingredients. Give it a go. Enjoy!

Thanks for being a subscriber. We appreciate you!

Cheers!

Jeff Knutson

Sloopy Soup Master 🙂

and lastly:

Stuffed Spaghetti Squash

 
Stuffed Spaghetti Squash - Jen Hoy
Stuffed Spaghetti Squash.  Jen Hoy

Updated February 12, 2016.

I love spaghetti squash, and have stuffed it on many occasions to make a wonderful vegetarian entree that presents well and is super tasty. I typically choose smaller squashes because I like to serve a half squash rather than navigate cutting the larger ones into portions, but either works fine. (The recipe is based on a smaller squash serving two people; if you go for the bigger one, just double the stuffing ingredients. See the tutorial on “How to Cook Spaghetti Squash” and we will proceed from there. The stuffing is an adventure and can go far beyond the simple version listed here: Pan Seared Wild Mushrooms make a great addition to the stuffing; so does topping the squash with homemade Summer Tomato Sauce or, for meat eaters, a ladle of Best Turkey Bolognese sauce. In other words, be adventurous and play around with this recipe. You won’t be disappointed.

  • 1 cooked spaghetti squash, about 7-8″ long and 1-1 1/2 pounds
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 4 cups spinach, baby kale, or chopped broccolini or broccoli rabe
  • Sea salt and pepper
  • Pinch of herbs de provence (optional)
  • 1 cup store bought or homemade tomato sauce or two tomato sauce (with sun dried tomatoes)
  • 1/2 cup grated manchego or parmesan cheese

PREPARATION

Preheat the oven to 400’F

Scoop out all of the insides of the spaghetti squash into a mixing bowl and set aside, reserving the shells of the squash.

Heat the olive oil over medium high flame and add the garlic, stirring for one minute.

Add the spinach (or kale or broccolini)and stir the greens until they are just wilted.

Season with salt and pepper, and add a pinch of herbs if desired.

Mix the greens and the spaghetti squash together, and adjust seasoning if needed.

Divide the mixture between the halves of squash.

Top the squash with tomato sauce and a generous sprinkling of cheese.

Place the squash in a baking dish and bake in the middle of the oven until the stuffing is heated through and the cheese has melted, about 15 minutes.

Serve immediately.

Variations: Use chopped broccoli instead of the greens, or add sautéed wild mushrooms along with the spinach. Top with goat cheese (or vegan cheese for a vegan entree). Serves 2

Copyright 2016 by Jen Hoy

 

Post 279: SPECIAL TRIP TO THE NEGEV – Tuesday, March 15 8:00 am – 8:00 pm approx 150 nis, entrance fees included For more info: 02-640-1401 klita.harnof@gmail.com Middle Eastern Inspired Carrot & Fennel Soup from BramCookware.com

SPECIAL TRIP

TO THE NEGEV

The Big Crater Obersavtion

Ein Ovdat

in Har Abnon

 Sade Boker

Tuesday, March 15

8:00 am – 8:00 pm approx

150 nis, entrance fees included

For more info: 02-640-1401

klita.harnof@gmail.com

Middle Eastern Inspired Carrot & Fennel Soup

Bram Middle Eastern Inspired Carrot & Fennel Soup

This great winter warmer will remind you of a sunny summer’s day gone by. Making this pretty soup is an ideal way to use the abundance of carrots while they’re available at their best. The taste is especially stellar if you can find small Thumbelina carrots which are rich in flavor. The chili oil drizzle at the end is highly recommended. Serve as a first course starter or with flat breads and assorted Middle Eastern mezzé or condiments to make it a light healthy meal.

Ingredients

Spice Blend
1½ tsp. whole coriander seeds
1½ tsp. whole cumin seeds
½ tsp. whole fennel seeds
½ tsp. ground turmeric
1 tsp. ground ginger

Soup Base
3 tsp. olive oil
1 medium onion, chopped
1 fennel bulb, chopped into rough dice
2 garlic cloves, diced
2 bunches (roughly 2 lbs.) carrots, peeled, chopped into medium size coins
3 medium potatoes, chopped into rough dice
1 tsp. sugar
6 cups warm water or chicken stock
1 lemon
Salt to taste

Garnish
1 tbsp. chopped coriander
Whole milk yogurt or Greek-style yogurt

Chili Oil (Optional)
½ tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
¼ cup olive oil-

Preparation

FOR SPICE BLEND: Grind whole seeds together with mortar and pestle or in spice grinder. Place into bowl and stir in ground turmeric and ginger. Yields approximately 4 teaspoons. Set aside 2½ teaspoons.

FOR CHILI OIL: Heat crushed red pepper flakes in olive oil until warm. Set aside to infuse for 20 minutes before using.

FOR SOUP: Place  soup pot on diffuser and add olive oil. Turn heat to medium low and let pot heat until oil starts to sizzle. Add onion and fennel and sauté for about 5 minutes. Sprinkle with salt. Place lid on pot and let sweat for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. When onion is translucent and begins to turn golden around edges, add garlic and 2½ teaspoons of spice blend, and stir. Continue sweating for another minute or until garlic and spices are very fragrant. Add carrots, potatoes, sugar, and stir again to blend. Replace lid and let sweat for a few more minutes. Add enough warm water or stock to cover, reserving one cup. Bring to boil and reduce heat to low and simmer. Cook for 20 to 30 minutes or until potatoes and carrots are soft. Cool slightly. Working in batches, puree soup in blender until smooth. Return to pot. (For a coarser texture,  puree with a handheld immersion blender.) Salt to taste and add squeeze of lemon to taste. Thin with reserved water or stock if desired.

Ladle soup into bowls. Top each serving with spoonful of yogurt and sprinkle with coriander. Drizzle with chili oil if desired.

Here are some recommendations:

Hummus
Olives
Roasted peppers in olive oil
Baba ghanoush