Post 57: Senior’s Suspenders-Tuesday and from Bento.com making fermented soybeans-tempeh

The following describes offers for seniors:

http://www.jpost.com/Health-and-Science/Orbachs-Suspenders-Tuesdays-to-offer-seniors-discounts-on-shopping-movies-361224

Very comprehensive article about the 10 sheckel price admission for seniors at the Cinema Cities Theaters throughout Israel. There is also a a weekly schedule available at the box office. Clearly, it’s possible to plan a visit to town and include a restaurant luncheon to offset the absence of tourists. This week’s edition included 6 films for children, and 36 for adults, including 13 in English with Hebrew subtitles. Only 16 are offered at any one time at a particular theater. The films are shared between the movie complexes in several cities. On second thought, that figure may not be correct. I counted 16 theaters but not all were open for a Tuesday show. But if more of US seniors show up-then it will make it worthwhile for management to open more theaters in the movie complex.

from Bento.com

Making Fermented soybeans-tempeh

used tempeh in dish
used tempeh in dish

Directions

Note: Please read the entire recipe first and make a note of the ingredients and utensils that will be needed. The starter culture must be obtained from store-bought natto or tempeh, unless you have other sources such as rice straw.

1. Soak two cups of dried soybeans overnight in ten cups of water. I also kept changing the water over several day until the beans sprouted. Cook in a pressure cooker for 30 minutes, first reaching pressure. Turn down the flame so that the hissing is at its minimum level. This lowering of temperature is accomplished by placing a reflector underneath, the pot, cooking an additional 15 minutes and allowing  to cool. DO NOT OPEN the pressure cooker yet. Allow the pressure cooker and its contents to cool down. If waiting is not your style, place the pressure cooker in the sink filled with cold water. (The soy beans are considered to have cooled down as long as its temperature is below 140 degrees F.) Remove some liquid and hold in a jar in the fridge.

2. Make sure that the kitchen counter and its surrounding area are absolutely clean. Sterilize a tablespoon with boiling water.

3. Wash your hands and arms – long-sleeved shirts not recommended.

4. Have a package of commercial natto/tempeh  ready.

5. Open the lid of the pressure cooker, and using the tablespoon, quickly mix in about two spoonfuls of natto/tempeh starter with the beans. Replace the cloth cover.

6. Place thie combination into a sterile food processor and mix for a minute.

7. Place contents back into pressure cooker.

8. Close the pressure cooker lid with its air relief hole uncovered.

9. Place the cooker in the oven with the light from the convection up to 3.  The tempeh will be partially ready in between 24 and 48 hours, depending on the temperature of the heating . As an alternate heat source, a 7.5-watt lightbulb may be used. If you don’t have a pressure cooker, a regular pot may be used. In this case, the cooking time will need to be increased to about two hours, and the amount of cooking water to about six cups.

10.My batch was not ready in the recommended  time. I placed the batch into a glass baking dish and mixed up to half of the tempeh remaining in the package and set it on the counter. I mixed half of this into the batch.  Then covered the baking dish to keep the moisture inside.

11. Repeated step 7. Checked after 24 hours to be sure that the dish wasn’t drying out. Repeated dousing the dish with the liquid mixed with tempeh the next 48 hours.

12. The result was not  the conventional tempeh. It was soft and only clinging together at the areas within an inch from the edge of the glass baking dish. Perhaps another 48 hours? Don’t know.  I mixed the “hamburger” like mixture with flax seed meal, cumin and tumeric. and made soy burgers, stuffed cabbage and grape leaves with it. My guests enjoyed the dish.

 

 

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